Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 35
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    89

    2 Fat Bike Questions.

    1. Do fat tire bikes handle fat riders better?
    2. Can fat tire bikes be used as your only bike (realistically)

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DavidJohn's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    223
    My answer is yes and yes.

    DJ

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    89
    Thanks, I am considering selling my bikes to build a fat tire and being a fatty myself I am thinking it might be a better fit

  4. #4
    MaverickMotoMedia.com
    Reputation: Gigantic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,407
    Yes.

  5. #5
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    7,059
    Quote Originally Posted by motorider View Post
    1. Do fat tire bikes handle fat riders better?
    2. Can fat tire bikes be used as your only bike (realistically)

    Thanks.
    1. Not necessarily. Depends on lots of other factors.
    2. Oh good god no.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    11
    I bought a Surly Pug in November. I can't really comment on question 1, I'm about 160 right now. As far as 2 goes, don't get me wrong, it's a fun ride, and one hell of a good workout, but if it were my ONLY bike I wouldn't be a happy camper. It's too much of a niche ride for that -- great for what it is and what it does, but it doesn't have the versatility, IMHO, to be a sole bike. YMMV, of course. To my mind, it's just too slow, with too much rolling resistance except on slick surfaces, to make a great primary bike. I have a 2013 Specialized Crosstrail Pro Disc as my primary bike, and the difference in the rides between that and the Pug are like the difference between a luxury car and a heavy duty utility pickup. Both have their place, but I couldn't get by with just the Pug.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    89
    Makes sense, thanks for the info

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: drofluf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    367
    Can't really comment on 1. But could it be my only bike? To be honest I'm not sure, but I recognise that I'm in a fortunate position and can afford several bikes. My Pugs is great fun to ride, will go anywhere and is great in the snow and mud but it's, compared to my 29er, relatively heavy and sluggish and sometimes I'll grab the 29er if I fancy a quick blast in the woods.

    At the end of the day I guess it depends on what sort of riding you plan doing
    If you need me I'll be at the bar

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nvphatty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    5,488
    yes & hell yes!

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kat71's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    126
    I ride my Fat Back year round and have for the past 4 years. I kept the Endomorph tire on the back but switched the front to a Nate. It makes riding on pavement much easier. I have a hard tail and I ride it from time to time.... but I always end up back on the fattie. It's a smoother ride and all you have to do is adjust the tire pressure for the terrain. It is slower but always more fun.... and you can ride it through anything... snow, sand, marshes, 4-wheeler trails, shale, etc....

  11. #11
    Nice try
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Posts
    62
    Go for it! You can mod/build it to suit your size and where you live and what you ride. I know
    that when I air up and ride on hard surfaces they roll just fine. And the ride is sweet. We all got to this forum by embracing something others thought and still do think is different so get on out there and be the trendsetter in your 'hood!! Enjoy!

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    164
    A Pugsley could easily be my only mountain bike, tons of fun on dry technical terrain. The only place I feel slower is on extended climbs but even then it's marginal. I have a Cannondale 1FG and Trek Stache 8 that have been collecting dust ever since the Pugsley showed up at my door.

  13. #13
    will rant for food
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,965
    1) I know a large guy who very often rides his Fatback.
    2) He is constantly losing weight on account of riding that and his other bikes.

    2a) I had a go at a fatty being my only bike when the Black Floyd tires became available. There are inconveniences that convinced me to abandon this thinking and keep at least two bikes.

    I have a Pugsley style bike and a 135mm dropout cross bike, those two bikes handle 95% of what I like to do.
    Latitude: 44.93 N

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: vikb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    6,207
    Quote Originally Posted by motorider View Post
    1. Do fat tire bikes handle fat riders better?
    2. Can fat tire bikes be used as your only bike (realistically)

    Thanks.
    1. No - I can't see why they would as the parts are not specifically designed for heavy riders.

    2. Only if you would be happy with a rigid mountain bike as your only bike. That wouldn't work for me.
    Safe riding,

    Vik
    www.vikapproved.com

  15. #15
    MaverickMotoMedia.com
    Reputation: Gigantic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,407
    I'm not fat, but at 6'8" & 250#'s, I qualify as exceptionally large... my pugsley handles much better than my Specialized 29er and perhaps counter-intuitively, it feels more stable, as well. It is, however, slightly more work to pedal than my 29er, partly due to the rolling resistance of the wider tires and larger contact patch, but also due to the lower tire pressures used. That said, since I took delivery of the pugsley, I have not ridden the 29er at all. I've mounted CX tires on it, with the thought of using it as a road bike, but I've been enjoying the Surly so much that I'm riding it everywhere- singletrack, around town, etc. I used to think that the guys I knew who rode their fatbikes everywhere were either mental or posers, but in fact, they're just having more fun. I guarantee if you have a fatbike as your only bicycle, (and ride it) you will not remain fat.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tbutter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    62
    I second ^^this comment as a fat dude myself 6.0ft 280lbs, you will become smaller riding a fatbike.
    Well everywhere but your legs, after while you should be able to push your foot through the floorboards of your car!!!

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    45
    My pug is providing me with a lot of fun on trail rides. Single track with short climbs/descents, lots of flow and lots of rock gardens, roots, log piles etc. Pug is just FUN and I am not in a hurry.

    Now for a long day in the mountains with lots of fire roads, smaller amount of single track, long bumpy down hills, long climbs my 29er mountain bike with suspension will probably be my choice. I will miss the fun of the pug on the single track but the 29er with suspension has edge in getting me through the downhills, the lighter weight for the long climbs and the lower rolling resistance for the miles of easy fire road.

    If I was to spend a lot of money on one fat bike with suspension, light and strong parts I could see 1 bike for all. Expect that price tag is 3-4 grand or more.

    Expect this year will be 75% pug on local trails and 25% on those twice monthly mountain rides.

    Also want to add I am over 50, have 2 artificial hips and plenty of bulk on my frame. The fat bike tire stability is what drew me to try a fat bike. Took 1 ride and I said "yeah this is just what I need to keep me riding".

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Jaredbe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    255
    I am not fat but rather far too short for my weight at 6 foot 265 lbs. For most of my rides a Fat bike is way better for me at this size than even my ridged Salsa 29r. The weight of the bike and wheels matters much less to larger riders. I have also been a 155 lb road racer kind of guy and may not have the same opinion at that weight. My fat bike is also my most versatile bike, the one I grab for most often and the one I would keep if I could have only one bike. If you remember that the air pressure in the tires needs to be adjusted to match the surface you are riding you can get a lot of different bikes out of this one ride.
    laotzucycles.blogspot.com

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Saul Lumikko's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    1,273
    Quote Originally Posted by Gigantic View Post
    due to the rolling resistance of the wider tires and larger contact patch, but also due to the lower tire pressures used.
    Lower pressure is the primary cause of increased rolling resistance. Tire tread and construction is also a factor, but there are better and worse tires for fat bikes and conventional ones.

    A wider tire at a certain pressure doesn't have a larger contact patch compared to a narrower tire, but the contact patch is wider and shorter, effectively retaining the same size. That's how pressure works, pounds per square inch.

    A shorter contact patch means less rolling resistance, so all else being equal, wider tires roll better.

    On the topic, I think tire width doesn't make a real difference as to how they handle load. Conventional bikes can be built and setup to handle a heavy rider with ease. A fat bike does offer an increased level of comfort, but so does a full sus - and you get rebound damping with those.

    It really depends on the intended use and person if you'd be happy with a fat bike as your only one. If I had to cut my stall to just one bike, I'd regret having to sell my Moonlander, but I would. (The keeper would be a 29er.)

  20. #20
    Perpetual n00b
    Reputation: dgw2jr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,194
    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    1) I know a large guy who very often rides his Fatback.
    2) He is constantly losing weight on account of riding that and his other bikes.

    2a) I had a go at a fatty being my only bike when the Black Floyd tires became available. There are inconveniences that convinced me to abandon this thinking and keep at least two bikes.

    I have a Pugsley style bike and a 135mm dropout cross bike, those two bikes handle 95% of what I like to do.
    Could you elaborate on the inconveniences you experienced?
    When the chicks at school see how gay we are, they're gonna be all over us.

  21. #21
    will rant for food
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    2,965
    Quote Originally Posted by dgw2jr View Post
    Could you elaborate on the inconveniences you experienced?
    Mostly using it for urban purposes, and bike convenience features that never had any concept of tires wider than 2 inches. Light rail. Locking it up. Putting it on someone else's bike rack.

    Additionally, less practical, more emotional reasons... Situations where I will sacrifice some ride cushion for the sake of being completely inconspicuous. Light rail (again), grocery shopping, work commute, etc. First world problem.

    Lastly, easing my own paranoia in high crime areas, which is infrequent, but if my **** gets stolen I'd rather it not be my luxury bike.
    Latitude: 44.93 N

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Nakedbabytoes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    858
    I am not a large rider, soi can't comment on that aspect.

    On #2, it really depends on your riding needs and preferences. My fattie Necro is my only MTB and it does perfectly fine riding singletrack, snow, sand, water, and with more psi...paved trails and roads. I don't find it a ton different than my old steel KHS or even my aluminum VooDoo(both 26ers). If anything, I can be lazy and not watch where I am going, those tires roll over everything like a monster truck.
    But does it replace my carbon fiber racing triathlon road bike with aero bars??? Heck no. I certainly wouldn't use the fattie to do triathlons unless they were the "tough mudder" kind(that would rock!) and I worry too much about it getting stolen if I lock it up as an errand bike, so I use my converted fixed gear 1970s road bike for that. Any my mountain unicycle, well that is just plain an awesomely good time!
    So would I have a fattie as my only bike? Maybe if I didn't need a fast aero bike to race on. Maybe if I was fine with locking up a nearly $2000 bike outside of a sports bar & grill for a few hours.
    But it does ride and do everything I need an MTB to do, so for that, yes it could be my only bike.
    But why choose??

  23. #23
    Puro Vida!
    Reputation: Nelson34's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,289
    I'm rather fluffy and just recently had a Pivot 5.7C built up with all the bling-even carbon rims. Bought a used Pug in September. The Pug sees way more dirt! I have to also say that right now I'm a weekend warrior with little spare time and maybe ride 1x a week.

    The Pug definitely is more of a workout, but it's more fun to ride-for me. The sound of the tires, looks people give you all just add to the fun. I compare my Pug like a big, old comfy caddy while my Pivot is like a race car.

    I just recently got a Mendon Lefty so this should further enhance my Pug love. So a lot of it just depends on what type of rider you are and the type of riding you do. You can always put Rabbit Holes on a Pug and switch up the ride?

  24. #24
    Perpetual n00b
    Reputation: dgw2jr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,194
    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    Mostly using it for urban purposes, and bike convenience features that never had any concept of tires wider than 2 inches. Light rail. Locking it up. Putting it on someone else's bike rack.

    Additionally, less practical, more emotional reasons... Situations where I will sacrifice some ride cushion for the sake of being completely inconspicuous. Light rail (again), grocery shopping, work commute, etc. First world problem.

    Lastly, easing my own paranoia in high crime areas, which is infrequent, but if my **** gets stolen I'd rather it not be my luxury bike.
    Thanks! Between my wife and I we had 2 fat bikes. Travelling with them was a pain. On Memorial Day weekend 2012 we went up to Chequamegon in Wisconsin. On the trip up every little bump in the road caused the bikes to bounce around violently. I was so paranoid of losing them to a bump or the wind. Gas mileage sucked!

    We rode the Drummond cluster for half an hour and finally bailed due to mosquitoes. Trying to mount those bikes back on to the rack while being swarmed with skeeters was a living hell. Every inch of exposed skin was covered in blood. When we got back to the main road I had to check the bikes to make sure they were secure since I had mounted them in a panic.

    Back in Hayward, the 2 bike shops did not have any fat bike specific stuff available. I had 2 spare fat tubes but I didn't think that was enough if we wanted to be riding 20 miles from the trail head. So we only ventured about 5 miles from each trail head we visited. Not really a big deal but we did drive 8 hours and we wanted to make the most of the trip.

    It seemed like every road trip with the fat bikes was plagued with paranoia. The bikes had to come into the motel with us so they wouldn't get stolen, and they take up so much space once indoors. After 6 months of fat bike ownership, the wallet and my sanity couldn't take it anymore. As much as I loved the bikes, they just were not practical for our uses. I emphasize because it's important to understand what the intended applications will be for those considering a fat bike as their only bike.

    In the end, both fat bikes sold 1.2 seconds after they were listed, and the funds covered 3 months of mortgage payments and 2 brand new hardtail 29ers. After that our road trips became much more enjoyable. We made the Chequamegon trip again in July with the 29ers and I was actually able to enjoy myself that time around.
    When the chicks at school see how gay we are, they're gonna be all over us.

  25. #25
    MaverickMotoMedia.com
    Reputation: Gigantic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    1,407
    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Diller View Post
    Mostly using it for urban purposes, and bike convenience features that never had any concept of tires wider than 2 inches. Light rail. Locking it up. Putting it on someone else's bike rack.

    Additionally, less practical, more emotional reasons... Situations where I will sacrifice some ride cushion for the sake of being completely inconspicuous. Light rail (again), grocery shopping, work commute, etc. First world problem.

    Lastly, easing my own paranoia in high crime areas, which is infrequent, but if my **** gets stolen I'd rather it not be my luxury bike.
    I haven't had any issues with mine & light rail, it takes up the same amount of space as my 29er, give or take a few inches. I also live in a high crime neighborhood; I carry 3 locks for a reason, no matter what I ride. damn right I have it insured, though...

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •