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  1. #76
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    I've decided to buy a Burley d'lite for my twins. I'm trying to decide between a 2009 that's been used less than 5 times for $200, a new 2012 close-out for $400, or a new 2013 model. I don't know much about the 2009 model, but it's practically brand new. I'm not crazy about the 2013 price, but I'm drawn to the new features below. Any advice on which year/model to choose? Is it worth the extra money for the features below? Would the 2009 be just as good? Or would you go the middle of the road?

    - Easy fold frame latches
    - Wheel Activated Suspension
    - Seat clips for easy removal of the seat
    - Adjustable active suspension
    - Retractable sunshade

  2. #77
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    In my indecision, the 2009 sold. So I'm down to the 2012 close-out or a 2013 model.

  3. #78
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    I'm in the same boat as you, just as unsure and wish the new one didn't cost so much!

  4. #79
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    Hi chidoc,
    Since my twins are so young, I have absolutely NO time to drive all over the place looking at used bike trailers. Also most are selling w/in a couple of hours on Craigslist...in MN...in Feb (middle of winter here!). So I opted for the Burley d'lite 2012 close-out model on Amazon for $400. We'll be using it for 4-5 years and will sell on CL when our kids have outgrown it.

  5. #80
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    I just purchased a Burley Bee but my bike has a 142+x12mm thru-axle and the mount is not compatible with my bike. Have any of you with a Burley encounter this problem?

  6. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by ApertureF1 View Post
    I just purchased a Burley Bee but my bike has a 142+x12mm thru-axle and the mount is not compatible with my bike. Have any of you with a Burley encounter this problem?
    I have the same thru-axle setup with a burley trailer. Let me know if you come up with anything.

  7. #82
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    Bike trailer

    I have a GT series 1 bike and all the reviews I keep reading about trailers say that they are hard to fit with trailers. Any info would be great on the best trailer for my bike. Thanks.

  8. #83
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    Trailers: Chariot/Burley vs everything else-canon-camera-369.jpgWe bought a instep about six years ago and it has been great for us.. We carried two kids in it on many trips. One thing I love is the wheels come off and it folds flat for easy storage/transport. Nothing has ever broken, the only sign of wear is on the nylon and that is because I left it exposed while whipping down the highway. Best part I paid about $25 for it new!

  9. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burley Trailers View Post
    Hi Jonz. Saw your post. Here's a quick piece of info on what separates Burley from the others - ****************GE6hrl If you have any questions, we'd love to help!
    Props to you guys for being reps on the site!!!

    Now question for you....We bought a Burley years ago. But we later replaced it after 2 years.and have been wondering a few things. It color faded really fast due to not being vinyl and not polyester and eventually tore all over. And the thing stuck out on the left side. I always felt strange. Has either of these issues for us been addressed? W still have te Burley....I use it as a utility trailer!

  10. #85
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    We use a Croozer 737 for our daughter. Croozer and Chariot are from the same place. A little heavy but very stable especially when taking long bendy high speed sweeps. If you keep these high-end trailers away from the sun's uv rays, it will keep it's color. The amazing thing about these trailers are their second-hand value. Picture of my set up:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Trailers: Chariot/Burley vs everything else-cannondale-croozer-737.jpg  

    Trailers: Chariot/Burley vs everything else-croozer-737-geinea-rear-lights-full-flight.jpg  

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  11. #86
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    I went with the chariot cougar 1, and a cougar 2(for sale if interested) we loved them, my son can now ride on his own at 4.5 so we don't need the double anymore.

  12. #87
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    I rented a Burely a few times and liked it. I ended up buying a Chariot Cheetah 2 for cheap on Ebay because of all the attachments you could get for it. My son absolutely loves it! I don't think you can go wrong either way, both are really well built.

    Trailers: Chariot/Burley vs everything else-2013-10-03-17.24.51.jpg
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  13. #88
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    Chariot cx1

    We go everywhere with our little girl in the Chariot! She loves it. Trailers: Chariot/Burley vs everything else-image.jpg

  14. #89
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    We love our Chariot Cougar!! Its the single one, but I'd get another double if I had two kids.
    FirstBike Balance bikes in Canada http://www.scampergear.com

  15. #90
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    I have a 3.5 year old and a 1.5 year old. My brother has a 2 year old. We both have Surly Big Dummies and love them.

    Thanksgiving 2013 - Hazel, Thomas, and Callum on the big dummies. from adam roberts on Vimeo.



    The only real downside of the cargo bike is when it gets really cold. When it is below about -5C, we put them in our chariot cougar2. (Which has a ski attachment to tow behind the fat bikes too!)

  16. #91
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    Sorry if this is too late. For 2 wheeled trailers, I won't recommend anything but a Cycletote. I was initially hesitant to buy one I found at a craigslist garage sale because it looked so plain that I thought it was cheap. I was wrong and it was a steal at the $50 or $60 we negotiated to. The mounting system is just awesome, as is the build quality and versatility. New, they aren't cheap but they aren't outrageous either.

    I'm not sure how easy they are to get as they are built in Fort Collins, CO as a smaller company. (I live there when I bought mine.) I am sure a Google search would answer that question - it is worth the time.

    Just a note that there is stroller conversion kit, while it functionally works it isn't that great in use. We bought a double BoB instead for the kiddos.

  17. #92
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    Surly

    Cool video! I think the dummy is our next adventure bike.


    Quote Originally Posted by carbontubulars View Post
    I have a 3.5 year old and a 1.5 year old. My brother has a 2 year old. We both have Surly Big Dummies and love them.

    Thanksgiving 2013 - Hazel, Thomas, and Callum on the big dummies. from adam roberts on Vimeo.


    The only real downside of the cargo bike is when it gets really cold. When it is below about -5C, we put them in our chariot cougar2. (Which has a ski attachment to tow behind the fat bikes too!)

  18. #93
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    Good thread.

    I was looking for a trailer for my now 4 month old (to be used next summer).

    Friends recommended the Chariot brand but I got sticker shock.

    Discovered that Mountain Equipment Co-Op (MEC) in Canada sells rebadged Croozer's (737 and 535).

    MEC Child Trailer Double - Mountain Equipment Co-op. Free Shipping Available

    MEC Child Trailer Single - Mountain Equipment Co-op. Free Shipping Available

    Cheaper than the Croozer price and readily available.

    I then checked Kijiji/Craigslist and am picking up a barely used one for less than 50% of the original cost.

    I will probably be able to use it for a few years and sell it for what I paid.
    Last edited by Swerny; 10-06-2014 at 11:26 AM.
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  19. #94
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    What are the off-road capabilities of these various trailers like? From what I can gather, only the Chariots have any form of suspension which would seem to indicate the rest are not suited to anything rougher than gravel trails. Any feedback would be awesome!

  20. #95
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    Burley:

    Quote Originally Posted by Trusty Steed View Post
    What are the off-road capabilities of these various trailers like? From what I can gather, only the Chariots have any form of suspension which would seem to indicate the rest are not suited to anything rougher than gravel trails. Any feedback would be awesome!
    I've taken my Burley on asphalt, gravel, cinder, and dirt over various farm/forest roads and MUT doubletrack. But the surface needs to be hardpacked and smooth.
    Where you have to be careful is with abrupt obstacles and transitions: roots, sticks/logs, potholes, uneven road-to-bridge transitions, etc. You have to REALLY slow down for these or it will rattle the hell out of the trailer.

    One other thing so keep in mind is dust. My kids hate having the plastic rainfly down. I always just have the insect screen down. If you're off road and the trails are really dry, the kids are going to be choking down dust regardless of how good the trailer suspension is.

  21. #96
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    Trailers: Chariot/Burley vs everything else

    Last summer on a group outing over forest service roads that included some rough sections, a friend (Friend 1) rode behind my Chariot CX setup and another friend's (Friend 2) Burley setup. Friend 1 commented that the difference in suspension and bounce effect on kiddos was dramatic when observed from behind. The Burley kids got bounced all over the place. (Think covered wagon vs Humvee). That experience cemented her decision to get a Chariot for her own kiddos.

    One of the things I like about the Chariot leaf spring suspension (same principle as used on cars) is that it is easily adjustable, without tools, for optimum cush for different weight ranges or different surface conditions (smooth road vs bumpy dirt). Just as my wife and I need different suspension settings on our FS bikes (she is tiny and I'm...medium), so does a trailer with two 40 lb kids vs one 20 lb kiddo. Easy cheesy.
    "I thought you'd never love me without my Mojo." -Austin Powers

  22. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trusty Steed View Post
    What are the off-road capabilities of these various trailers like? From what I can gather, only the Chariots have any form of suspension which would seem to indicate the rest are not suited to anything rougher than gravel trails. Any feedback would be awesome!
    IMO these two-wheeled trailers are meant for gravel smoother paths with occasional roots and ruts only. Best be mindful of the child's head and neck any rougher than that. For rougher terrain we should consider a trailer with baby-seat cushioning and head support. Cabin protection is quite ordinary for Croozer and Chariots alike. The child will get thrown a little regardless of the harness.

    If you really want to go singletrack riding etc with a trailer then Tout Terrain or Cavery Cab is the best way to go. At least the single-wheel is taking the same line as your bike. This should minimize having the trailer's wheel caught in roots, ruts and whatever else. Wouldn't want the trailer to anchor on something.
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  23. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbRevolution View Post
    IMO these two-wheeled trailers are meant for gravel smoother paths with occasional roots and ruts only. Best be mindful of the child's head and neck any rougher than that. For rougher terrain we should consider a trailer with baby-seat cushioning and head support. Cabin protection is quite ordinary for Croozer and Chariots alike. The child will get thrown a little regardless of the harness.

    If you really want to go singletrack riding etc with a trailer then Tout Terrain or Cavery Cab is the best way to go. At least the single-wheel is taking the same line as your bike. This should minimize having the trailer's wheel caught in roots, ruts and whatever else. Wouldn't want the trailer to anchor on something.
    Thanks for the thoughts.

    I have been somewhat underwhelmed by the design of most of these trailers, as most would appear incapable of properly handling anything more than gravel paths as you have suggested.

    Although the single-wheel trailers seem to offer some advantages, the main problem is that the Tout Terrain and Cavery Cab only seem capable of carrying one child. I already have a child seat for our first child, and the reason why I am looking at trailers is so that I can transport both children.

    Do you think the two-wheel trailers are inherently limited by their width or could they be suited to off-road use with a better suspension setup?

  24. #99
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    Yes, a two wheeled trailer, even if it had superduper top-of-the-line offroad suspension, is going to be limited by width to at least double track and you'd still want the trail a bit wider so you could pick a line. You might be able to get away with singletrack if the ground is clear and relatively level on either side of the trail. That would require being familiar with the trail beforehand (which always a good idea when biking with kids anyway). And your kid is still going to be eating dust, regardless of the suspension.

    The suspension on the Chariot seems to work best on roads - like a car suspension (as already mentioned). It does fine on dirt roads and fire trails too. I tried it on singletrack once. The kids got quite bounced around, but had a good time anyway. They were little sugar cookies back there, all covered in a fine layer of dirt. We don't do that too often. However, the trailer itself held up just fine. Its very sturdy.
    Surly Cross Check: fat tire roadie
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  25. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by bolandjd View Post
    Yes, a two wheeled trailer, even if it had superduper top-of-the-line offroad suspension, is going to be limited by width to at least double track and you'd still want the trail a bit wider so you could pick a line. You might be able to get away with singletrack if the ground is clear and relatively level on either side of the trail. That would require being familiar with the trail beforehand (which always a good idea when biking with kids anyway). And your kid is still going to be eating dust, regardless of the suspension.

    The suspension on the Chariot seems to work best on roads - like a car suspension (as already mentioned). It does fine on dirt roads and fire trails too. I tried it on singletrack once. The kids got quite bounced around, but had a good time anyway. They were little sugar cookies back there, all covered in a fine layer of dirt. We don't do that too often. However, the trailer itself held up just fine. Its very sturdy.
    Really appreciate the feedback! I'd agree the width is always going to be an issue, regardless of suspension for the two-wheel trailers. However I would be interested to know how the single-wheel options go on singletrack with the increased turning circle? Granted the two-wheel trailers will have this problem too. Perhaps singletrack simply isn't feasible with a trailer and I will need to stick with wider paths

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