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  1. #1
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    I'm afraid I goofed up....

    I was anxious to get my boy on a bike. So Santa brought him a Strider right after his 1st Birthday. He loved it from the minute he set his eyes on it. I sat him on it and pushed him all around the house. He had not mastered the skill of walking yet so he really wasn't ready to put wheels under him. To save my back I adapted a bar to the handlebars so I could steer & keep him upright.
    I recently started thinking this bar is kind of like training wheels. It's not teaching him how to ride. It's only giving him the ability to sit on a bike. So I figured I need to take it off. He is now almost 21 months old and he has been using it all summer pretty frequently. Once I took that bar off I knew I made a mistake. He can't keep the bike upright because he's relying on me to keep his balance. He now doesn't want anything to do with it. Where before he practically begged to ride it.
    I'm sure over time he will get over it and be fine but I think I goofed in getting excited about putting him on a bike. Should have waited a while longer to put him on a bike without the added bar.

    My point in this thread is to warn others that attaching a bar or anything like that to a bike to keep it balanced is NOT a good idea. If your going to do that you might as well put your kid on a bike with "training" wheels....UGH!
    uʍop əpıs ɹəqqnɹ əɥʇ dəəʞ ɹəqɯəɯəɹ pəɥsɐɹɔ əʌɐɥ ʇɥƃıɯ noʎ sıɥʇ pɐəɹ uɐɔ noʎ ɟı

  2. #2
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    Transition to holding his collar/shoulders with your hands to keep him upright and very gradually back off from the amount of assist you give him.

  3. #3
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    Just give him some time... he'll get there. But I feel your pain.

    Is he big enough that he can comfortable put his feet down flat on the ground? If so, then he just needs to get his confidence back. My girls started by walking over the bike, not even sitting down.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrayJay View Post
    Transition to holding his collar/shoulders with your hands to keep him upright and very gradually back off from the amount of assist you give him.
    That's the plan. Like evandy said I just need to give him time. I'm sure he will be fine and doubt it will take long as eager as he is towards that bike.

    Quote Originally Posted by evandy View Post
    Just give him some time... he'll get there. But I feel your pain.

    Is he big enough that he can comfortable put his feet down flat on the ground? If so, then he just needs to get his confidence back. My girls started by walking over the bike, not even sitting down.
    He can easily put both feet flat on the ground. I had the saddle up a little higher when I was pushing him but figured without my assistance he needs more clearance between him and the saddle.
    uʍop əpıs ɹəqqnɹ əɥʇ dəəʞ ɹəqɯəɯəɹ pəɥsɐɹɔ əʌɐɥ ʇɥƃıɯ noʎ sıɥʇ pɐəɹ uɐɔ noʎ ɟı

  5. #5
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    Get the seat set for his stand over then loop an old tube around the seat post like a leash. Saves your back and allows you to provide stability to assist him while not being too intrusive in his mastery of balance. At first you can keep the tube tight providing lots of assist. As he gets better give him some slack so that he can feel it lean before the stretch of the tube intervenes. You can also use this to reel him in at intersections, downhills or when you have other safety concerns.

    I used this with my 2nd child and 2 other neighborhood kids.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by wvmtb View Post
    He can easily put both feet flat on the ground. I had the saddle up a little higher when I was pushing him but figured without my assistance he needs more clearance between him and the saddle.
    Remember that there are no pedals on a balance bike; proper position on one is with the feet flat on the ground, knees slightly bent. But the comfort of the child is even more important. Setting it too low isn't a problem; setting it too high /is/ since there's nothing to keep them from falling over.

  7. #7
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    I prefer a good amount of bend at the knee, doing so allows the kiddo to really run- you'll see a good placing after watching them on it. Too high and they can't get a good push with the leg.
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  8. #8
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    My experience isn't as a parent, but I did a lot of bike sales at different shops and spent a lot of time talking to parents.

    Something you or other parents might consider is something like this:
    Name:  AmazonBikeTrainerHandle.jpg
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    It allows you to control the bike, but the child doesn't see it. Probably wouldn't work on a Strider but on larger bikes it can be very helpful. And it only costs $25.

    Like others said, I'm sure he'll get used to it. At his age he's already ahead of a lot of kids. If he really likes riding, at some point he'll see Dad riding and that will motivate him to give it a shot.

    With all the running bikes available, I don't much reason for training wheels anymore. Most kids that started on run bikes seem to be able to adapt to pedal bikes w/o training wheels, since they already have the balance skills. For older children getting started later, I have even removed the crankset/chain from bikes with larger wheels (12", 16", 20"), effectively making them into a balance bike. Pretty cool.

  9. #9
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    I think my next step is to let him learn to keep it upright on his own. Of course with some assistance from me. But I'm over attaching anything to the bike and I feel it's almost as bad as putting training wheels on.
    I've seen different versions of that bar and it will not work on the strider as his saddle was slammed almost all the way down and there was only a fraction of an inch between it and the tire. That's why I adapted the bar to his handle bar. IMO it was better because I could also control his steering
    uʍop əpıs ɹəqqnɹ əɥʇ dəəʞ ɹəqɯəɯəɹ pəɥsɐɹɔ əʌɐɥ ʇɥƃıɯ noʎ sıɥʇ pɐəɹ uɐɔ noʎ ɟı

  10. #10
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    My daughter used her bike on and off as a chair for awhile. She was a little scared to ride it, but sometimes she just sat on it with her feet on the floor watching TV. Or she would ride it the 8 ft. from the family room to the kitchen. Once she realized she could control it, she was fine, but it took a little while - and NO help from me.

    -F
    It's never easier - you just go faster.

  11. #11
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    Don't discount the possibility that a ton of enjoyment your kid got out of 'riding' his bike was the fact that he had total attention and physical involvement with you. Taking away the bar and letting him ride on his own reduces that.

    I haven't had this issue with my kids on bikes, but have in other areas. They avoid progression as it means less attention/involvement from mom & dad - ex - you can't waste time on your phone if you've got both hands holding Jr. up on his bike.

    This becomes less of a problem as they get a bit older and start to really enjoy independence.

  12. #12
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    Don't discount the bar right away. He may need a little more time to get used to steering input and handling the bike. I had my 3 yr old riding solo on two wheels by using the buddy bar. It took about a week of me working with him. He had observed his 5 yr old brother learning the same way and decided not to be outdone. His brother then tackled him on the lawn as a form of congratulations. They had both used training wheels early on until I decided that was enough of that.

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    At two years old, I'd say you are overthinking things. None of this will matter at all a couple years from now, (unless you're some kind of tiger dad dead set on having your kid to win BMX nationals by the age of 3 or something). At your kid's age, I would do whatever it is that is the most fun for him.

    FWIW, my kid started out on the dreaded training wheels. He asked to take them off right around his 4th birthday. He turned 9 earlier this year; his time on training wheels didn't seem to have any long-term negative effects on his riding abilities or the amount of fun he has on a bike, and he'd be more than happy to jump over you to prove it.

    I'm afraid I goofed up....-e.jpg

  14. #14
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    +1 for not worrying. I got a balance bar for my youngest's strider and once he mastered walking and I stopped using the bar, it took him a few months to really get going onthe strider. But now he is on it constantly trying to keep up with his older brother.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by wvmtb View Post
    I think my next step is to let him learn to keep it upright on his own. Of course with some assistance from me. But I'm over attaching anything to the bike and I feel it's almost as bad as putting training wheels on.
    I've seen different versions of that bar and it will not work on the strider as his saddle was slammed almost all the way down and there was only a fraction of an inch between it and the tire. That's why I adapted the bar to his handle bar. IMO it was better because I could also control his steering
    If you want him to ride it bring over a kid who's 4 or 5 let them fool around with it.. He'll see them having fun and want it back for himself.
    When you've seen someone rupture their scrotum on a bike you won't take the standards for top tube clearance lightly!

  16. #16
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    My youngest always wears a backpack with a lead when he is on his bikes LittleLife - For Life's Little Adventures | Toddler Daysacks | Kids Daysacks | Child Carriers | Travel Cots | Childrens Safety Harness. It provides a handy place to grab, and the lead can be used if you need to keep then close, or slow them down on a big downhill.

    It might help your son if you could hold onto his backpack to help him get the hang of balancing.

  17. #17
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    Also he loves to watch videos of kids on bikes on youtube. At your son's age he loved Lenny On His Puky Balance Bike 2 years Old 2011 - YouTube

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