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  1. #1
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    Daughters first 26er

    Just a quick thank you for the great info and inspirational builds that are up on this site. It was a big help through the minefield of trying to build up a quality mtb for your kids.
    Like most on here, it took a while to find a frame and come to a decision on cranks but in general it came together really well and more importantly she loves riding it.
    Rigid carbon forks for now, she's tall but only 28kg so it's fine with low pressures for the moment while I work on a lightweight fork option.
    Mixture of new and second hand parts and some hand me downs from my old bike I recently replaced. Cost was around $7/750
    Still need to replace the rear tyre but it's got a bit more life in it yet.

    Generic coke can XS frame
    On one carbon forks
    37mm stem
    Carbon flat bars
    LX trigger
    XT 9 speed RD
    XT 11-36 cassette
    Dur ace chain
    Driveline 155mm cranks
    Race Face narrow wide 30t chainring
    Deore brakes
    Mavic 223 wheel set
    Specialized carbon seatpost
    Selle Italia ladies saddle
    10kg-22lbs

    Daughters first 26er-image.jpgDaughters first 26er-image.jpgDaughters first 26er-image.jpg

  2. #2
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    Looks nice! How does she like it so far?
    --------------

    [WTB] 1987 Cannondale SM800, 20", Pink with airbrushed graphics.

  3. #3
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    Loves it
    Coming from a bmx race bike, I thought it may take a bit of getting used to but she was off and running as soon as I put her on it. I just had the rear brake on at first since it was what she was used too, and let her get used to changing gears. Front brake went on a few weeks later, so far no accidents and the 1/9 set up seems to be perfect with no dropped chain issues, eems to be mixed opinions on whether you really need a clutch.
    Seems to have no problem with the trigger shifter either.
    Has done a lot for her riding confidence and as is getting braver with each ride surprising us both at what she's capable of.
    I'm confident it's all down to the quality and fit and really glad I made the effort.

  4. #4
    Hardtail Steel Forever
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    I doubt you'll have much trouble with dropped chains with that chainring and a properly adjusted rear derailleur. I think most issues are when people go 1x using a normal ramped chainring or poorly tuned rear derailleur.

    I think you had the right idea with the shifters as well. I can see the theoretical benefit, but my experience with kids and grip shifters isn't good. Most kids bikes seem to come with grip shifters as well and I'm not sure the manufacturers ever actually did a direct study on it.

    99/2000 SID is probably the lightest and cheapest option that's easy to find and easy to service. You'll have to run virtually zero pressure, but should work great.

  5. #5
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    Yep I ran my bike without a clutch for a short while before I moved back to XT from X7 & had no issues with the chain at all, so figured it will be fine.
    I debated the grip v trigger shift thing for a while and it just boiled down to the fact I had the trigger, so gave it a try and she hasn't really had any issues at all.
    In fact her only issue is a tendency to stand and grind up the hill rather than shift, not such a bad thing anyway and she'll get it in the end.
    Thanks for the tip on the fork.
    I have a Mars elite from around the same time and similar weight in the shed, I'll have a look at that first but I seem to remember it needed new bushings as well as seals and their getting hard to come by these days so the Sid might be a sensible option.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jestep View Post
    99/2000 SID is probably the lightest and cheapest option that's easy to find and easy to service. You'll have to run virtually zero pressure, but should work great.
    Definitely go for an older SID fork. 100mm travel will be fine, and as you will want 26" wheeled version and a straight steerer tube they can be had fairly cheaply. I run stupidly low air pressure on my kids ones (50-60lbs) but they get full travel and the fork works over small bumps with their light weight pushing on it.

  7. #7
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    Dad of the year!

  8. #8
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    Any particular model Sids I should keep my eye out for or avoid?
    I'm obviously wanting the lightest one I can find but is there model that may even be a more practical choice for performances or longevity as she gets older, heavier and braver.

  9. #9
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    Don't go too old -- avoid any SID forks that have dual cantilever/disk brake mounts. Go for disk brake only versions. You won't be able to go too new either, as they start to come with tapered steerer tubes and I expect your frame is a straight.

    If you see a Blackbox version grab it, as they are much better over the small stuff, which is ideal for light weight riders. But any SID will be great.

  10. #10
    Hardtail Steel Forever
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    I run older v / canti SID's on 3 bikes I own and haven't ever had a problem with any of them. 1 is a 98 and doesn't even have disc tabs, the others have both disc and v tabs. 2 even have the original seals on them still as well. The new ones are better but for this sort of usage as long as they don't leak, I can't imagine there being much difference.

  11. #11
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    Budget will probably steer me towards an older model but I reckon I've got 6 mths before I probably need to change. For now she's learning to read the trail better without just bombing though it. While her experience and courage grows I'll keep an eye out to see what turns up, thanks for the info guys.

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