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  1. #1
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    Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review

    It's about that time.

  2. #2
    wretch
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    Mine looks great in pieces. Waiting on wheels and Reverb. But have not been this excited to hop on a new bike in a long time. Coming off an Enduro 29 and RIP RDO.

    ----
    Fox Float 36 -110
    Push Eleven Six
    Reverb
    XTR 1x w/ XT Cassette
    Deity DC31 Bar + grips
    Deity 35mm Stem
    Enve M70 HV + King hubs
    WTB Rubber + Saddle

  3. #3
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    Truckee Trash - What size frame did you end up on, and what size E29 were you riding? Height & inseem? Trying to decide between M and L on the Wreckoning. The Enduro 29 is one bike I can actually compare against.

  4. #4
    wretch
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    I went XL - I was on a Large Enduro and should have been on an XL - i've spent too many years sizing down! 6'3" w/ atleast 34" inseam. My old RIP RDO was the first XL i've had and it felt great to finally be riding "in" the bike vs. on top of it. I should have it built up Wednesday or Thursday of this week!

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    Hi Truckee Trash, as soon you try the bike, please upload a comparison against the E29.

    Im waiting to see the Enduro 29 and decide between the E29 and the Evil.

  6. #6
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    Sub'd. Report after dialing and more riding.
    Big Wheels and Fat Skis keep me young.

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    Gonna be on 18Rd. in Fruita this weekend getting mine dialed in. I'll post some feedback Monday, maybe Sunday night.


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  8. #8
    wretch
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    Will do - waiting on a replacement front brake - it's killing me!

  9. #9
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    Wreckoning Ride Report (posted this in an earlier thread a week or so ago)

    Background

    I own a Following and I consider it one of the best bikes I have ridden in my 20 years of mashing pedals. The Following is definitely in my top 5 of all time (in no order: following, uprising, SC V10-26in, Knolly Endorphin-26in and Chromag Surface)

    Stats

    I'm 6'3/6'4 and 180lbs. I like my bikes on the smaller side so instead of XL's I usually ride L's. Just my preference and works with my riding style. I also ride 2-3 times a week in SoCal (dusty, rocky). My Following is a L with 170mm cranks, 50mm stem and 800mm bars (same thing with the Wreckoning)

    Why the Wreckoning?

    Even though the Following is more than capable of crushing most trails there have been times I had wished for more travel. With bike park season getting close I figured the Wreckoning would be a good addition to the quiver. I took it out and thrashed it around and here are my thoughts. Hopefully it can help some of you with making a decision to get one or not.

    It's burly

    First looking at it you realize how over built the Wreckoning is compared to the Following and it's clear why team dudes are winning DH races aboard this whip. Oversized tubes and thick junctions are confidence inspiring and that's just based on the looks. My Wreckoning has the Vivid shock and Boost Lyrik Dual position.

    Going up

    The bike is noticeably heavier than the Following but the Wreckoning still can climb with the best or at least bikes in the same class. Definitely not the fastest up the hill and not as fast as the Following going up but if you buy this bike you obviously aren't buying it to crush those fire road climbs. Rest assured you can still crank up the hill and enjoy the ride down.

    Flats and "playfulness"

    The first thing you notice is that this bike only comes to life when things start getting fast. At slower to moderate speeds the bike felt like a tank and doesn't have that willingness to slash and pop around the trail like the Following. However once I got up to speed the bike came to life and would crush bermed corners and eat any chunder or trail obstacles. Again, I wasn't able to bounce off objects or manual as easy but that would change once I got cooking.

    Point it down and hold on

    Now this is what this bike was meant to do. It's almost scary how dominating this rig is. It floats over the harsh terrain with ease and makes the steep technical gnar feel easy. Even when moments where I thought I was entering sections too fast the bike maintained composure and rolled through with ease. I was hooting and hollering down sections I'm normally quiet with laser like focus. It's the first "all mountain" rig I've ridden that reminded me of what it feels like riding a DH bike. Flat out ripper and confidence inspiring.

    The bike handled slow tech really well which surprised me. I thought the 160mm fork, slacked front end and 29in wheel would make it clumsy but that wasn't the case. The bike definitely wants to be ridden fast though and even when I didn't pick the right line it didn't phase the bikes course of travel.

    Should I get one?

    I'm sure if you are still reading this you are trying to answer that question. It really comes down to the type of riding you do (or want to do). The Following is a super capable rig and has surprised me on numerous trails from bike parks to gnarly tech trails. The Following does get out of its comfort zone on trails that might normally be reserved for DH or "Freeride" style rigs but it will still get you down, it's just a bit more nerve racking. The Wreckoning (in my opinion) is aimed at the person who wants to tackle seriously treacherous terrain at speed. This bike is probably the closest to a DH bike I've ridden in the AM/Trail category. If you are looking for some thing with more travel for comfort or peace of mind this bike will satisfy that need as well. It won't win any hill climb races (unless it's technical / think truck-rock-crawler). You can't go wrong with either bike because both are super fun.

    For you A.D.D types

    -crushes downhills / closest to a DH bike but can go up hill
    -best when going fast
    -not as playful at slow to medium speeds compared to the Following
    -confidence inspiring
    -bad chain clearance with 32x10 but not a deal breaker
    -heavy compared to the Following but not a deal breaker
    -one of the most fun bikes I've ridden

    See you out there.

  10. #10
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    Does anyone have any experience riding their Wreck in extra-low vs low setting? Have only ridden in low setting so far.

  11. #11
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    30% Switch?

    Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review-switch.jpg

    Anyone know what flipping this switch forward to cover the 30% text vs flipping it to the opposite side of the track does to the bike? I didn't get any documentation with frame, leaves me thinking hmmmmmm....BTW the photo is rotated, this is actually non-drive side of bike, bottom left corner is actually the high side of the downtube.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnctzn View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Anyone know what flipping this switch forward to cover the 30% text vs flipping it to the opposite side of the track does to the bike? I didn't get any documentation with frame, leaves me thinking hmmmmmm....BTW the photo is rotated, this is actually non-drive side of bike, bottom left corner is actually the high side of the downtube.
    DO NOT FLIP THAT SWITCH, the shock linkage will fall apart!

    Kidding, that's the built-in sag meter. Push the switch to cover the "30%", sit on the bike and see where it sits. The top edge should be at the line just below the "30%" text; you thereby know you're sagged in.

    Note that this is not super-accurate; measuring via the O-ring on the shock is a better way to go.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnctzn View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Anyone know what flipping this switch forward to cover the 30% text vs flipping it to the opposite side of the track does to the bike? I didn't get any documentation with frame, leaves me thinking hmmmmmm....BTW the photo is rotated, this is actually non-drive side of bike, bottom left corner is actually the high side of the downtube.
    Tells you how bad ass your last ride was. Post back when it says 90%

  14. #14
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    Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review-push11-6.jpg

    Ok not badass yet, that was finger-net adjustment! Thanks for tuneup guys, using Push shock on new frame for first time, this will help me get a measure of how much travel I'm using.

    Push shock is a really interesting experience so far. On my old ride (Rocky Altitude with Fox non-Evol can) the suspension was slightly mushy off the top in comparison, and really wallowed mid-stroke. Simplest way I can describe the Push so far is like it's not even really there, the bike just 'feels' like a short travel XC bike but you're getting a ton more travel. I think this is because the travel is just so dialed in, it feels supremely linear and supportive across the travel. It doesn't feel plush, nor does it feel harsh, it just feels solid and consistent. More as I get a better feel for it.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnctzn View Post
    Does anyone have any experience riding their Wreck in extra-low vs low setting? Have only ridden in low setting so far.
    Just ran X-low today. I also went down to a 50mm stem (had a 60) and until the mountains open up for some "steep", I think that I prefer the low and 60mm. I've got long-ass arms, and the combo of X-low and shorter stem left me feeling a little cramped. Maybe just go back to low for now.

    Also, I noticed that I buzzed the seat tube (LB 38's/Minion SS)and smuged the sticker up a little....time for a new bike.

    I said that I was going to post a reveiw last night, but..............life. Until I get some more time on the bike, and in different configurations, I'll keep it brief for now, with just some general thoughts and observations.

    I'm 6'3"+ with 36+ inseam
    55 years old
    Aggressive rider; Cat1 XC, Cat2 CX, Open Veteran Enduro...done well in all.

    I'm glad I listened to Chip, and got the XL. It really dosen't feel like too big(long) of a bike, and is so stable at speed. On the local trails, it's almost as quick as my Following (actually quicker on some). Once this thing gets on the steep and gnar this Summer, I can't think of a better bike for me.....no sh!t G.I.

    It's very quick side to side, changes lines on command, handles tight switchbacks amassingly well for a long bike, and is just plan fun to ride. I thought that it would be way too much bike for the trails that are open this time of year around here. Well....... it is, but somehow, it's still fun as hell to ride.

    I've heard that some guys are selling their Following, but to me, there is enough seperation that I will be keeping mine. I built my Wreckoning pretty solid, and don't fancy doing all day epic's on it.

    I've also seen where some have said that it dosen't come alive until you get it to "speed". That has not been my experience. FWIW, I feel the bike is comfortable/playful/agile, at just about any speed. This suprised me......in a good way YMMV.

    The only issues I'm working on are airtime, and lifting the front end. The first is operator error, and most of the jumps around here have short, steep lips. Short tranny/lip - long bike...I dunno.....I'll get back to you when I get more dialed. The second is because it's got a long-assed front end, and I suck at manuals.

    All for now.

  16. #16
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    Quick ride update, I'll post more later. Currently at camp. 4 laps on 18rd in Fruita. Prime Cut up, down on Kessel, Joe's Ridge, Mojos, twice on PBR. Surprisingly playful and snappy out of corners. Short rear end is noticeable for sure. Really impressive pedaling platform. Predictable when jumping. I didn't get to test it on anything steep or tech yet, but it's impressed the hell out of me so far. No negatives. 6'2" on an XL, 35mm stem, perfect fit. Monarch Plus shock.


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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by evenflo View Post

    'SNIP'

    It's very quick side to side, changes lines on command, handles tight switchbacks amassingly well for a long bike, and is just plan fun to ride. I thought that it would be way too much bike for the trails that are open this time of year around here. Well....... it is, but somehow, it's still fun as hell to ride.

    I've heard that some guys are selling their Following, but to me, there is enough seperation that I will be keeping mine. I built my Wreckoning pretty solid, and don't fancy doing all day epic's on it.

    I've also seen where some have said that it dosen't come alive until you get it to "speed". That has not been my experience. FWIW, I feel the bike is comfortable/playful/agile, at just about any speed. This suprised me......in a good way YMMV.

    The only issues I'm working on are airtime, and lifting the front end. The first is operator error, and most of the jumps around here have short, steep lips. Short tranny/lip - long bike...I dunno.....I'll get back to you when I get more dialed. The second is because it's got a long-assed front end, and I suck at manuals.

    All for now.
    Great Update. Couldn't agree more. Still dialing in. With every ride bringing something new its hard to summarize and compare. I do find, as you said, it's not necessarily speed that brings it to life but active aggressive riding. A willingness to pump and push and direct the bike pays off at any speed. Just pedaling, the bike is so efficient that it's easy to forget how much bike is there… until needed, then it never fails to deliver.

    Finding some more Wreck-worthy terrain to stretch it out a bit:
    Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review-wahab.jpg
    Wreckoning looking for the White Whale.

    Also, out of enlightened self-interest, wondering what tuning you found to work to help settle the rear-end down?
    Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review-17.jpg
    The next variable.
    Big Wheels and Fat Skis keep me young.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheCanary View Post
    Great Update. Couldn't agree more. Still dialing in. With every ride bringing something new its hard to summarize and compare. I do find, as you said, it's not necessarily speed that brings it to life but active aggressive riding. A willingness to pump and push and direct the bike pays off at any speed. Just pedaling, the bike is so efficient that it's easy to forget how much bike is there… until needed, then it never fails to deliver.

    Finding some more Wreck-worthy terrain to stretch it out a bit:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Wreckoning looking for the White Whale.

    Also, out of enlightened self-interest, wondering what tuning you found to work to help settle the rear-end down?
    Click image for larger version. 

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    The next variable.
    As stupid as it sounds, the main culprit was too much air in the rear tire........like way too much air.

    Before my first ride, my guage showed 24.5, so being in a hurry to beat the darkness, I didn't give it a squeeze test. Turns out I had 32psi when I checked the next day. Must have had some sealant blocking the valve core or something.

    I also went back to the base tune that Push installed when I bought the shock for my Nomad. Much better now.

    I'm still fiddling with the settings to find the best set-up, and have found one problem with this shock/bike match.........the rebound knob is a pain in the ass to get to.

    I'll post a more complete opinion of the 11/6 on a Wreckoning when I get things dialed in. I may put an air shock on it, to provide a comparison.....we'll see.

    Looks like your bike is in it's happy place, gnar for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

    I should add that I was running a Minion SS for the first time. It is very sensitive to over inflation..............duh.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheCanary View Post

    Also, out of enlightened self-interest, wondering what tuning you found to work to help settle the rear-end down?
    I'm running the Vivid on mine. I feel like the sweet spot is 0-2 clicks from open on the LSC, 2-3 clicks from open on both beginning and ending rebound. And 28% sag. The bike did feel a little pogo sticky so I added an extra click of ending stroke rebound with good results. Admittedly I am still fiddling with settings.

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    I'm hoping someone will be able to compare to the Enduro 29.

  21. #21
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    Evenflo, thanks for the update. Did you move the 11-6 straight over or have PUSH do a re-valve? When I talked to them it came up that the Nomad and Wreckoning where very close but slightly different base valving, probably within the dial range of adjustment - just guessing. This will be my first coil shock, part of the reason to have the Wreckoning, wanted an aggressive platform worthy of trying out different shock and fork combo's.
    The Coil will have to be pretty amazing to top the re-valved Vivid, probably will keep both as options for different missions.

    CC - Still running the Vivid and had some great rides in the Moab Gnar after some mods/tuning. The first few local rides it felt great, plush/bottomless, but was using all the travel too often/easy. Had the local tuner do some volume spacers and re-valve and it was awesome both on fast chunder and drops in Moab. Currently running about 190 psi(#195 RTR) for 25% attack sag with 2-3 LCS from open, R-end 2-3 from open, and R-beginning 5-6 from Closed(hard to turn while mounted so haven't done clicks to open). Still bottomless but handled the bigger(for me, 3-4') drops no problem and much better through the mid-travel.

    Hardest part is getting enough riding to see everything this bike is capable of, I'll just have to do what I can.
    Last edited by TheCanary; 04-03-2016 at 11:04 AM.
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    Interested in hearing what you think of 11-6 when you get some time on it. It is the route I went for direct through evil.


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    Quote Originally Posted by TheCanary View Post
    Evenflo, thanks for the update. Did you move the 11-6 straight over or have PUSH do a re-valve? When I talked to them it came up that the Nomad and Wreckoning where very close but slightly different base valving, probably within the dial range of adjustment - just guessing. This will be my first coil shock, part of the reason to have the Wreckoning, wanted an aggressive platform worthy of trying out different shock and fork combo's.
    The Coil will have to be pretty amazing to top the re-valved Vivid, probably will keep both as options for different missions.

    CC - Still running the Vivid and had some great rides in the Moab Gnar after some mods/tuning. The first few local rides it felt great, plush/bottomless, but was using all the travel too often/easy. Had the local tuner do some volume spacers and re-valve and it was awesome both on fast chunder and drops in Moab. Currently running about 190 psi(#195 RTR) for 25% attack sag with 2-3 LCS from open, R-end 2-3 from open, and R-beginning 5-6 from Closed(hard to turn while mounted so haven't done clicks to open). Still bottomless but handled the bigger(for me, 3-4') drops no problem and much better through the mid-travel.

    Hardest part is getting enough riding to see everything this bike is capable of, I'll just have to do what I can.
    When I called Push, they said to just swap it over to the Wreckoning. When I first bought the 11/6, I was on the cusp between running a 375# or 400# spring. We went with the 400, but after a month or so, I put the 375# on to get deeper in the sag on the Nomad.

    The first run on my Wreckoning, I kept the 375#, but put the 400# on after, and I'm a little over 30% seated sag, with no preload.

    My base tune is 12 lsc/14 hsc for DH and 4 lsc/6 hsc for climbing. All clicks from closed, and 8 clicks rebound.

    If/until I put an airshock on the bike, I obviously can't say if the 11/6 is the best way to go for this bike. I can say that I'm pretty damn happy with how it rides now. Hands down, it was the best thing I could have done for the Nomad. I am pretty confident that no air shock is going to match the traction the 11/6 provides....both up and down.

  24. #24
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    If you don't mind me asking what is your riding weight?


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  25. #25
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    Sure. I'm 177 with armour, then add for water,food,tools and such.

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    Thanks


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    Interesting. I told them #195, +/-#5(#180 BN) and got the #425 spring. Was told that spring range covered #180-195 RTR.
    Base tune: 1 turn preload. Downhill valve: 12LSC, 14HSC. Trail/climb valve: 6 LSC, 12HSC. Rebound 9.
    Even with the 165 cranks, getting more pedal strikes with this bike. I think with the long wheelbase getting more straddle-over/high-center but its sensitive to sag with the Vivid. Running more like 25% sag feels better. Hoping the linear coil set-up may enable a little more range to play with on the sag with less trade-offs.
    Bottom line is I get to ride more to find out. Loving this bike and having a blast tweaking the set-up and seeing what it can do.
    Big Wheels and Fat Skis keep me young.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheCanary View Post
    Interesting. I told them #195, +/-#5(#180 BN) and got the #425 spring. Was told that spring range covered #180-195 RTR.
    Base tune: 1 turn preload. Downhill valve: 12LSC, 14HSC. Trail/climb valve: 6 LSC, 12HSC. Rebound 9.
    Even with the 165 cranks, getting more pedal strikes with this bike. I think with the long wheelbase getting more straddle-over/high-center but its sensitive to sag with the Vivid. Running more like 25% sag feels better. Hoping the linear coil set-up may enable a little more range to play with on the sag with less trade-offs.
    Bottom line is I get to ride more to find out. Loving this bike and having a blast tweaking the set-up and seeing what it can do.
    Are you running low or X-low?

    I think you may be on to something with using less sag. The following really needs a lot of air to feel right(high in the sag), so it stands to reason that the Wreckoning will as well. I was thinking of adding a turn of preload, or a little more. I really don't want to add more than a turn and a half, as you just start subtracting from the coil's benefits.

    When do you plan on putting the 11/6 on, or did I miss something..........wouldn't be the first time.

  29. #29
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    Haven't tried X-low yet, maybe this summer if I get to a bike park, probably too rocky around here.
    11/6 arrived this weekend, hope to check it out this week. Excited to try the coil based on all I've heard, but, honestly, the bike is so good as is.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheCanary View Post
    Haven't tried X-low yet, maybe this summer if I get to a bike park, probably too rocky around here.
    11/6 arrived this weekend, hope to check it out this week. Excited to try the coil based on all I've heard, but, honestly, the bike is so good as is.
    Cool Beans.

    I'm really interested to hear your comparaion. It's been said that the Evil's are really optimized for air springs, but the 11/6 is so smooth and adjustable, I can't see myself going back to air. I remember my first ride with it on the Nomad, and it would not be hyperbole to say that it completely changed the bike for the better.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheCanary View Post
    Interesting. I told them #195, +/-#5(#180 BN) and got the #425 spring. Was told that spring range covered #180-195 RTR.
    Base tune: 1 turn preload. Downhill valve: 12LSC, 14HSC. Trail/climb valve: 6 LSC, 12HSC. Rebound 9.
    Even with the 165 cranks, getting more pedal strikes with this bike. I think with the long wheelbase getting more straddle-over/high-center but its sensitive to sag with the Vivid. Running more like 25% sag feels better. Hoping the linear coil set-up may enable a little more range to play with on the sag with less trade-offs.
    Bottom line is I get to ride more to find out. Loving this bike and having a blast tweaking the set-up and seeing what it can do.
    i am getting less and less pedal strike on the insurgent as time goes on, i was in the same boat. i am not running x low exclusively though and leaving the 11 6 wide open. i just low x low and the pedaling doesn't really bother me. i rode 23 miles in x low with the shock wide open, lots of climbing, it wasn't easy but since the trailing undulates so much closing and opening was not an option. x low is more extreme!!!! go for it.....

  32. #32
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    RE: Low vs. X-low, FWIW conversations I've had with Kevin at Evil have gone like this:

    Following: you gotta put it in the lower setting, it rips!

    Wreckoning: Yeah, I'd stick to the higher setting. That X-low setting is really low. Maybe for the park....

  33. #33
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    Good feedback. Definitely want and enjoy all the travel, adjusting to the tradeoffs. Glad I went with the 165 cranks.
    Certainly getting what I want and then some from this bike.
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  34. #34
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    Update: So I put a turn and a quarter of pre-load on my 11/6, and it was a definite improvement. I think I'll go to 1 1/2 and see if provides more support, without impacting the suppleness. I'm sure that you can tune it back in. but at some point, the law of diminishing returns kicks in.......or not. It would be nice to have a shock guru buddy to help, but suppose I can call Push if I get too wraped around the axle.

    Also, someone on this board was asking for a comparison to my Nomad 3.

    Both are XL's running the 11/6

    The Wreck is 8mm longer, but feels and handles like a smaller bike.

    Both are great at speed, but the Wreck is more playful at less than warp.

    The N3 will eat chunk, and until I really get the chance, I can only assume the Wreck will eat chunker chunk.

    In order to really get the most out of the N3, I really had to muscle the bike to do what I wanted. In tight, twisty stuff, I needed to put my nose, seemingly, over the axle......made for some interesting moments. The Wreck is so balanced for my body size/shape, that I don't have to purposely weight the front-end.

    Both climb well for what they are.

    Both are great bikes, but for me, the Evil wins hands down.

    Now it's movie time.

    These are the trails I'm stuck with for the time being, and before you rip into me, I thought I knew the guy I passed on the Moto trail(great rider) and would have slowed down more otherwise. Sorry for the wind noise; Sony Action cams have a stupid location for the mic.


  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by evenflo View Post
    Update: So I put a turn and a quarter of pre-load on my 11/6, and it was a definite improvement. I think I'll go to 1 1/2 and see if provides more support, without impacting the suppleness. I'm sure that you can tune it back in. but at some point, the law of diminishing returns kicks in.......or not. It would be nice to have a shock guru buddy to help, but suppose I can call Push if I get too wraped around the axle.



    Also, someone on this board was asking for a comparison to my Nomad 3.

    Both are XL's running the 11/6

    The Wreck is 8mm longer, but feels and handles like a smaller bike.

    Both are great at speed, but the Wreck is more playful at less than warp.

    The N3 will eat chunk, and until I really get the chance, I can only assume the Wreck will eat chunker chunk.

    In order to really get the most out of the N3, I really had to muscle the bike to do what I wanted. In tight, twisty stuff, I needed to put my nose, seemingly, over the axle......made for some interesting moments. The Wreck is so balanced for my body size/shape, that I don't have to purposely weight the front-end.

    Both climb well for what they are.

    Both are great bikes, but for me, the Evil wins hands down.

    Now it's movie time.

    These are the trails I'm stuck with for the time being, and before you rip into me, I thought I knew the guy I passed on the Moto trail(great rider) and would have slowed down more otherwise. Sorry for the wind noise; Sony Action cams have a stupid location for the mic.

    The video is set to private.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AaronJobe View Post
    The video is set to private.
    opps

    fixed

    thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by evenflo View Post
    opps

    fixed

    thanks
    you ride w/ a computer? what's your top speed, average on that run?
    breezy shade

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    Quote Originally Posted by nhodge View Post
    you ride w/ a computer? what's your top speed, average on that run?
    Yup, I got some sweet clip-on aero bars to.

    FWIW 27.3 and 20.9 on the Moto track(top section to the creek).....not sure about the rest.

  39. #39
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    I've put a decent number of miles on the Wreckoning at this point, and thought I'd chime in with ride thoughts. For perspective I've been on a Following exclusively for ~5 months, and before that had owned a who's-who of trail bikes: Tallboy LTc, Bronson, Mach6, Ripley, Nomad, HD3.

    Short version: it's a Super Following. The bike really feels like a Following in many respects, but with a bit less playful pop, and a LOT more margin of error when things get burly.

    First off, the feel/build experience. I'm 6'2"/185lbs, on an XL Wreckoning and loving the fit with a 40mm stem. This thing is burly; the frame came in at 8lbs with a Monarch, rear axle and headset. Once built, it just feels much more solid and planted than the Following; the frame feels noticeably stiffer. From the first pedal stroke you can tell this thing wants to be pushed. I think not running stiff carbon rims does a disservice to this bike, especially if you're a bigger guy. Full build with XT, Lyrik and Nox Farlow/I9 wheels and serious tires came in at a shade over 31lbs. Everything went together well, and the bike is smooth and silent on the trail.

    The bike climbs quite well (for what it is.) I need to do some measuring, but I feel that at the same saddle height the effective STA is steeper than the Following. Traction is great for tech climbing and out-of-the-saddle efforts. After many months on the Following, I found myself over-shooting a few tight uphill switchbacks due to the longer front end, but this is mainly a matter of getting used to the bike.
    I was happy to engage the climb switch on the Monarch for long fire-road grinds, but the bike goes up damn well for a 31+ lb 29er, with no more pedal feedback than I've found on any 160mm bike. The only minor complaint is that you can't really run a ring smaller than 32T without some clearance issues to the chainstay. There are some climbs around here where a lower gear would be nice; SRAM Eagle or a 50T conversion might be worth considering.

    The down is obviously where this baby shines, and this thing is frankly a bit terrifying downhill (in a good way.) I found myself hitting speed I have not previously touched, doubling features I normally roll, and blasting into rock gardens I normally pick my way through. It pops and jumps really really well, much better than the Nomad (which I always found to be a total plow/sled at the expense of any playfulness). Not quite as playful as a Following, but definitely not a dull plow of a bike either.
    Coming from the Following, riding the Wreck feels very intuitive, just punched up in a few areas: you need a bit more bike angle/input to get into flatter corners, and as things get steep and gnarly the bike remains totally composed, instead of getting squirrely like a Following can. To be honest, the similarity to the Following has been almost challenging: It feels like a Following so I ride it like a Following, rather than pushing it as hard as it can be pushed. When I land a longer drop or huck to flat, I expect the harsher feel of a 120mm bike, and instead get a soft landing and a feeling like the bike is saying "seriously, is that all?" And the damn thing snaps into corners like a slot car with that short rear end.

    Bottom line: this bike rips, and I'm not even approaching its limits. But what's surprised me is that this is a trail bike, as well as a very very good near-DH bike. I had expected the Wreck to be burly as hell and most at home in a bike park or shuttling. While it will definitely be GREAT in those settings, I would also not be afraid to saddle this thing up for a multi-hour alpine epic. I'd still prefer a Following for that application, but the Wreck will most certainly get up climbs and not feel like a total fish out of water on less-than-pucker-worthy descents. Evil has carried over the extreme versatility of the Following, but pushed it further toward the aggressive end of the spectrum. In the same way the Following spans applications from aggro-XC through mild Enduro, the Wreck goes from aggro-Trail to double-diamonds in the bike park. All in all, it's a badass machine.

    Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review-img_3417.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    All in all, it's a badass machine.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Great report. You put into words, how I also feel about the bike......only a lot better than I could.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    I've put a decent number of miles on the Wreckoning at this point, and thought I'd chime in with ride thoughts. For perspective I've been on a Following exclusively for ~5 months, and before that had owned a who's-who of trail bikes: Tallboy LTc, Bronson, Mach6, Ripley, Nomad, HD3.

    Short version: it's a Super Following. The bike really feels like a Following in many respects, but with a bit less playful pop, and a LOT more margin of error when things get burly.

    First off, the feel/build experience. I'm 6'2"/185lbs, on an XL Wreckoning and loving the fit with a 40mm stem. This thing is burly; the frame came in at 8lbs with a Monarch, rear axle and headset. Once built, it just feels much more solid and planted than the Following; the frame feels noticeably stiffer. From the first pedal stroke you can tell this thing wants to be pushed. I think not running stiff carbon rims does a disservice to this bike, especially if you're a bigger guy. Full build with XT, Lyrik and Nox Farlow/I9 wheels and serious tires came in at a shade over 31lbs. Everything went together well, and the bike is smooth and silent on the trail.

    The bike climbs quite well (for what it is.) I need to do some measuring, but I feel that at the same saddle height the effective STA is steeper than the Following. Traction is great for tech climbing and out-of-the-saddle efforts. After many months on the Following, I found myself over-shooting a few tight uphill switchbacks due to the longer front end, but this is mainly a matter of getting used to the bike.
    I was happy to engage the climb switch on the Monarch for long fire-road grinds, but the bike goes up damn well for a 31+ lb 29er, with no more pedal feedback than I've found on any 160mm bike. The only minor complaint is that you can't really run a ring smaller than 32T without some clearance issues to the chainstay. There are some climbs around here where a lower gear would be nice; SRAM Eagle or a 50T conversion might be worth considering.

    The down is obviously where this baby shines, and this thing is frankly a bit terrifying downhill (in a good way.) I found myself hitting speed I have not previously touched, doubling features I normally roll, and blasting into rock gardens I normally pick my way through. It pops and jumps really really well, much better than the Nomad (which I always found to be a total plow/sled at the expense of any playfulness). Not quite as playful as a Following, but definitely not a dull plow of a bike either.
    Coming from the Following, riding the Wreck feels very intuitive, just punched up in a few areas: you need a bit more bike angle/input to get into flatter corners, and as things get steep and gnarly the bike remains totally composed, instead of getting squirrely like a Following can. To be honest, the similarity to the Following has been almost challenging: It feels like a Following so I ride it like a Following, rather than pushing it as hard as it can be pushed. When I land a longer drop or huck to flat, I expect the harsher feel of a 120mm bike, and instead get a soft landing and a feeling like the bike is saying "seriously, is that all?" And the damn thing snaps into corners like a slot car with that short rear end.

    Bottom line: this bike rips, and I'm not even approaching its limits. But what's surprised me is that this is a trail bike, as well as a very very good near-DH bike. I had expected the Wreck to be burly as hell and most at home in a bike park or shuttling. While it will definitely be GREAT in those settings, I would also not be afraid to saddle this thing up for a multi-hour alpine epic. I'd still prefer a Following for that application, but the Wreck will most certainly get up climbs and not feel like a total fish out of water on less-than-pucker-worthy descents. Evil has carried over the extreme versatility of the Following, but pushed it further toward the aggressive end of the spectrum. In the same way the Following spans applications from aggro-XC through mild Enduro, the Wreck goes from aggro-Trail to double-diamonds in the bike park. All in all, it's a badass machine.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Good review and kinda what I expected, like a roid'd up Following. Nice shot with Rainier.
    Did you keep you Following?

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by manitou2200 View Post
    Good review and kinda what I expected, like a roid'd up Following. Nice shot with Rainier.
    Did you keep you Following?
    Yes, I still have the Following and plan to keep it, at least for now. I could see maybe considering something a bit lighter and sprightlier on the climbs, like a Ripley LT, just to further differentiate it from the Wreckoning...

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    Yes, I still have the Following and plan to keep it, at least for now. I could see maybe considering something a bit lighter and sprightlier on the climbs, like a Ripley LT, just to further differentiate it from the Wreckoning...
    As a compliment maybe a CB EPO or Fuel EX. Intense is going to launch the new Spider 29C sometime before the end of the year is my guess. Or if 27.5 is an option a Divinci Django or the new Spider 27.5.
    Or build the Following a little lighter and with a 120mm fork. I've been riding mine with a 120 and it's still very fun quicker handling and even better climbing.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by manitou2200 View Post
    As a compliment maybe a CB EPO or Fuel EX. Intense is going to launch the new Spider 29C sometime before the end of the year is my guess. Or if 27.5 is an option a Divinci Django or the new Spider 27.5.
    Or build the Following a little lighter and with a 120mm fork. I've been riding mine with a 120 and it's still very fun quicker handling and even better climbing.
    ...or I've heard rumors of a fully updated Following sometime next year. If they lighten it up and refine the suspension (maybe designed around a longer-stroke shock?) that could be a winner!

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    ...or I've heard rumors of a fully updated Following sometime next year. If they lighten it up and refine the suspension (maybe designed around a longer-stroke shock?) that could be a winner!
    I could see a 2" stroke and lighter weight would be nice, steeper seat tube. These would be good upgrades. They could probably keep the rear triangle as is from a mold/ tooling cost standpoint.

  47. #47
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    Threaded bottom bracket would be nice too


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by manitou2200 View Post
    I could see a 2" stroke and lighter weight would be nice, steeper seat tube. These would be good upgrades. They could probably keep the rear triangle as is from a mold/ tooling cost standpoint.
    I'd expect them to go Boost. I'd hope they'll also do away with the front der. mount so they can widen then main pivot, a la the Wreckoning. For the shock, I wonder if they'll go to one of the new metric sizes. All wild speculation you understand!

  49. #49
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    Threaded bottom bracket, ability to run an external reservoir shock and a steeper seat tube angle. I'll buy another one if that happens 😁

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    ...or I've heard rumors of a fully updated Following sometime next year. If they lighten it up and refine the suspension (maybe designed around a longer-stroke shock?) that could be a winner!
    2-3 new bikes in the works for Evil so stay tuned. New DH bike

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    Quote Originally Posted by wake jake View Post
    2-3 new bikes in the works for Evil so stay tuned. New DH bike
    Haha, stay tuned... **** you.. We all know what that means with Evil.

  53. #53
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    So, I'd mentioned in a much earlier post that I'm running a Hopey steering damper on my Wreckoning. I've had enough time on this little unit to offer my opinion.
    As we all know, the Wreckoning has an amazing ability to not only shred the gnar down, but also handle the ups surprising well. There are a couple drawbacks to climbing with a bike like this, one being weight, and the other being the slack head angle makes you wander all over the trail like you've got whiskey in that Camelback. Now I don't have any interest in running skimpy parts on a 160mm bike, so the weight is part of the deal. But what if I told you that constantly chasing the bike all over the trail on the climbs is a thing of the past.
    I must say that I was skeptical of running a steering damper on a bicycle, I mean, really, sounds kind of silly doesn't it? I've got a couple of friends that have been running them for years, and swearing that I should give it a try. One of the guys told me that if I didn't like it that he would buy it from me, so I figured what the hell.
    On the website Hopey Steering Dampers they have two models listed, a DH model, that only dampens high speed impacts. And the Hopey original, (that I opted for). The original only dampens away from center, and is fully adjustable. I think It's priced appropriately at $199 for the damper, and another $50 for the upper headset bracket. There are a few bracket options, the Wreckoning, and the other Evil frames use the zero stack bracket.
    I'm not going to go in to detail about the installation process, but I will say it was easy.
    On the trail, or for that matter, in the parking lot test, it is very apparent that you are running a damper, I did what you'd expect, jerking the bars side to side, haha, pulling wheelies. I remember thinking "this is so weird". On the trail, it disappeared in to the kinetics of the bike within the first few turns, that's when you notice that the bike just isn't wandering like you'd expect with a 66.5 degree HA, I could stand and climb, and the bike would track like it was on rails. I really wasn't sure what to think at first, to be honest I barely noticed it, yet it was certainly doing its job. Same with the downs, I'd come banging in to a corner and it really doesn't feel any different, yet the bike would hold a line much better than without it. All of this resulted in much less arm pump, and really much less fatigue. As time has gone on, I ride with the dampening turned up about half way, there's a sweet spot that just feels goood, in a don't notice it kind of way. The surprise comes when you turn it off. All of a sudden it's as if I've completely forgotten how to ride a bike. Wandering around so bad that I damn near had to dab a foot on a basic trail climb.

    In conclusion, I'm sold on this little unit. It does what it's supposed to do, it drastically improves climbing prowess, and really helps hold your line in the super chunk going down. The reduced fatigue is really nice on the long descents, and it allows me to keep a looser grip on the bars overall. The weight penalty is minimal at 140 grams, and it was easy to install. The only downsides are that its not user serviceable, and from what I hear Tim Hopey is slow at getting the service done. And, like a dropper seat post, I'm not sure if I will remember how to ride without one.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review-image.jpg  

    Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review-image.jpg  


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    Hey Cap'n, thanks for that review, this certainly looks like an interesting piece. Do you ever feel like you're fighting it on the trail? Thinking of times when I'd bring the bars around fast, like navigating a very tight switchback. How about counter-steering when jumping, how's that work? I'd definitely be keen to try one, shame it's such a tiny company so a demo or test ride would likely be impossible....

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    Hey Cap'n, thanks for that review, this certainly looks like an interesting piece. Do you ever feel like you're fighting it on the trail? Thinking of times when I'd bring the bars around fast, like navigating a very tight switchback. How about counter-steering when jumping, how's that work? I'd definitely be keen to try one, shame it's such a tiny company so a demo or test ride would likely be impossible....
    I've had this bike in some pretty crazy situations, for example, coming in too hot to a rock garden, landing a jump and not quite being prepared for the corner that followed. I find the opposite of 'fighting it'. In a downhill situation it really only takes the edge off the trail chatter, and allows me to loosen my death grip a little. I've not had it limit my ability to maneuver the bike at all.
    Also keep in mind that it's fully adjustable on the fly. If you don't like the feel in a certain situation, simply twist the dial counterclockwise and it's off.

  56. #56
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    It's also worth noting that there is a Thread in MTBR forums specifically about this damper. You can find it if you search the term "Hopey damper". It's funny to read, as most people that run one of these really love it, and most of the negative remarks come from people who've never tried one but think it's stupid.
    Here it is, (MkIII) Hopey Damper install pics...

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Cobb View Post
    So, I'd mentioned in a much earlier post that I'm running a Hopey steering damper on my Wreckoning. I've had enough time on this little unit to offer my opinion.
    As we all know, the Wreckoning has an amazing ability to not only shred the gnar down, but also handle the ups surprising well. There are a couple drawbacks to climbing with a bike like this, one being weight, and the other being the slack head angle makes you wander all over the trail like you've got whiskey in that Camelback. Now I don't have any interest in running skimpy parts on a 160mm bike, so the weight is part of the deal. But what if I told you that constantly chasing the bike all over the trail on the climbs is a thing of the past.
    I must say that I was skeptical of running a steering damper on a bicycle, I mean, really, sounds kind of silly doesn't it? I've got a couple of friends that have been running them for years, and swearing that I should give it a try. One of the guys told me that if I didn't like it that he would buy it from me, so I figured what the hell.
    On the website Hopey Steering Dampers they have two models listed, a DH model, that only dampens high speed impacts. And the Hopey original, (that I opted for). The original only dampens away from center, and is fully adjustable. I think It's priced appropriately at $199 for the damper, and another $50 for the upper headset bracket. There are a few bracket options, the Wreckoning, and the other Evil frames use the zero stack bracket.
    I'm not going to go in to detail about the installation process, but I will say it was easy.
    On the trail, or for that matter, in the parking lot test, it is very apparent that you are running a damper, I did what you'd expect, jerking the bars side to side, haha, pulling wheelies. I remember thinking "this is so weird". On the trail, it disappeared in to the kinetics of the bike within the first few turns, that's when you notice that the bike just isn't wandering like you'd expect with a 66.5 degree HA, I could stand and climb, and the bike would track like it was on rails. I really wasn't sure what to think at first, to be honest I barely noticed it, yet it was certainly doing its job. Same with the downs, I'd come banging in to a corner and it really doesn't feel any different, yet the bike would hold a line much better than without it. All of this resulted in much less arm pump, and really much less fatigue. As time has gone on, I ride with the dampening turned up about half way, there's a sweet spot that just feels goood, in a don't notice it kind of way. The surprise comes when you turn it off. All of a sudden it's as if I've completely forgotten how to ride a bike. Wandering around so bad that I damn near had to dab a foot on a basic trail climb.

    In conclusion, I'm sold on this little unit. It does what it's supposed to do, it drastically improves climbing prowess, and really helps hold your line in the super chunk going down. The reduced fatigue is really nice on the long descents, and it allows me to keep a looser grip on the bars overall. The weight penalty is minimal at 140 grams, and it was easy to install. The only downsides are that its not user serviceable, and from what I hear Tim Hopey is slow at getting the service done. And, like a dropper seat post, I'm not sure if I will remember how to ride without one.
    Great review Cap!

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    Quote Originally Posted by tangrip9 View Post
    Great review Cap!
    +1

    Think I'll try one after your write-up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by evenflo View Post
    +1

    Think I'll try one after your write-up.
    Give it a couple weeks on your bike to really sink in, I think you will really like it..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Cobb View Post
    Give it a couple weeks on your bike to really sink in, I think you will really like it..

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    I was able to get a few hours in on the Wreckoning and can definitely say the head angle is too slack, the seat angle is too slack, it weighs too much, pedals like a pig, doesn’t handle single track or all mountain, basically this bike is an over built tank for the DH crowd only!

    Wrong, I could not have been more blown away by this bike. From the 1st pedal stroke the STA did not feel slack at all, if anything it felt considerably steeper than process 111. As for the HTA, again, on flat single track and AM conditions, it handled very well, if anything the front wheel felt planted, much more so than my Process 111. In fact, for mellow trail riding it felt similar to my process. The only difference, many of the bumps in the trail were more muted while at the same time the bike provided tons of snap and fun factor.

    Later I was able to make a quick 20 min climb followed by a lengthy DH session. Climbing was great but the DH was simply amazing. I started to understand why many say this bike needs speed. Once rolling it became an entirely different beast. Not sure “Beast” is the word because it simply felt more and more composed on the way down. I remembered saying to myself “wow, I can go as fast as I want and everything feels so natural”. For the 1st time since riding a 29er I didn’t need to think about body positioning, leaning the bike, braking or anything, the bike just worked. I also noticed my body positioning simply fell in place, everything just felt right.

    I can say that yes, this bike can easily be a quiver of one for many people, especially if you live in the PNW. Is it too much bike? I don’t think so, but I also know I’ll never be able to tap in to all she’s got. It doesn’t scare me as a trail bike but it also makes me want to further develop my skills to enjoy the Wreckoning's full potential.

    In closing, for anyone on the fence worried about the Wreckoning being too slack, too heavy, too everything, ignore the numbers, take it for a ride and you’ll be left very impressed. (Oh one last update, I'm 6'1.5" and rode the Large w 50mm stem)

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    If you are in WA you can form your own opinion. Had a damn fun day yesterday

    Progression Cycle - Facebook " Exciting news! We just added two Wreckonings from Evil Bikes to our demo fleet. We have a medium and a large. This is a true one bike quiver killer, and will make any trail enjoyable. Give us a call or shoot us an email to come get your shred on!"

  63. #63
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    There have been some good reviews early on, it's not so much that I don't have anything to add but more that I'm stunned by the bikes capability and having so much fun riding.
    It's basically just what you'd expect, a burly, long travel 29er that handles and pedals well, but until you start riding it the ramifications of having all those qualities in one bike aren't clear. Light and balanced as a sweet trail bike, quick and capable as great AM bike, burly as a DH crusher and fun, fun, fun... Oh, and fast, playful, and just Wow.

    I like it.
    Big Wheels and Fat Skis keep me young.

  64. #64
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    Well said. It's a sweet bike for sure. I did over 4000' of climbing on my Wreck yesterday, on a ride that included tight & twisty descents, wide open fast flowy trails, and legit DH gnar. The bike was awesome in every one of these conditions. I was within a minute of my PR for the 1600' initial climb, and set new downhill PRs on trails I've ridden 40+ times. Just wow.

  65. #65
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    Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review-wreckoning-break-hi-line-pic.jpg

    Maiden voyage on HiLine. Very confidence inspiring on the tech, ledge drop, poop chute backside and climbed pretty decent to the top through all the chunk, switchbacks, etc. Only complaint is that it's slightly less compliant over square edge hits while climbing. Pretty satisfied with the purchase and fun factor.
    2017 SB5c
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    2015 The Following

  66. #66
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    Am I the only one who thinks this bike is overweight? My XL Following is 3lbs lighter (29lbs) than my XL Wreckoning (32lbs), with exactly the same build (forks weigh the same). Both bikes have X01, Next cranks, 35mm carbon rims & Hope hubs so I there is probably only 1/2-3/4lb to loose by going full weight weenie. I know it has been beefed up for its intended use (and maybe their past woes), but it weighs the same my aluminium Rune with 180mm forks that I use for DH.

    I don't know whether I'm just getting old & unfit, but it the Following feels so much more lively on the flats and hills, like it is pushing you to go faster all the time. The Wreckoning feels almost lethargic in comparison, until it is pointed downhill when it comes alive. Maybe I just need more time on it, but I was hoping it was going to be a LT Following, but it feels more 29er Rune.

  67. #67
    LCW
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    ...or I've heard rumors of a fully updated Following sometime next year. If they lighten it up and refine the suspension (maybe designed around a longer-stroke shock?) that could be a winner!
    Hopefully not TOO soon.... I just picked up a Following!!

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  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    Well said. It's a sweet bike for sure. I did over 4000' of climbing on my Wreck yesterday, on a ride that included tight & twisty descents, wide open fast flowy trails, and legit DH gnar. The bike was awesome in every one of these conditions. I was within a minute of my PR for the 1600' initial climb, and set new downhill PRs on trails I've ridden 40+ times. Just wow.
    Could not agree more. I'm blown away by this bike. It's just how I felt when I first got my Following.

  69. #69
    wretch
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    It's heavy - though I have not weighed mine yet and I did a no holds build. I doubt I will weigh it. It's sort of like doing a long ass ride with no Garmin. I've got three varied rides on it so far and without getting deep ...

    I have an eleven six on it so I really have to remove that aspect from the bikes general impressions as in my mind it's not fair!

    Up. This will be my daily driver in Tahoe and the surrounding areas. I was very close to going with a Following but went this route simply due to angles and travel for my local terrain. In doing so I gave up climbing prowess. I can live with that. It works surprisingly well when pointed up. Yes it's tall, very tall, so you've got to start learning how to weight the bars and get forward on the saddle. It'll wonder, and it's even harder when your tired, but hardly something to put me off the bike. Technical up's are again, surprisingly do-able provided you work the front wheel and motor through your good to go.

    Flats - sort of like any 29'r really ... somewhat slow to start but get the motor going and again, you're all set. Im not sure what it is with the angles on the bike but, to me, it's still very playful and agile in the flats and rolling terrain.

    I liken the control of the bike to putting english on a cue ball. If you dip the bars and move the bike around, it'll do just that, the angles play nicely - I've found that the other 29'ers i've put time on feel too tall through tight turns and such and can't really get laid down.

    Downs - don't need to repeat what everyone else has already mentioned. Wow. Paired with the eleven-six I can either make mistakes that feel like calculated decisions, or just ride like a bat out of hell and go through anything. Faster and more playful than the time I had on my E29. I wanted to like the E29 more but I think the wheel base and slacker angles on the Wreckoning might be the golden ticket.

    Gripes? Ummmm cable routing rubber grommets are a little iffy and dont sit flush. The valve on the eleven-six contacts the RD and brake cables under light compression. I've got some cable ties for now but want to find a better solution.

    I'm running a 1.5 and a .7mm spacer on XTR cranks which I thought was OK but I had some chain contact on the inside plate of the guide. Rather than add another spacer or play that game, I just dremeled down the surface of the guide to allow an unobstructed chain line.

    The 36 feels good ... I've been on a Pike for so long now it's hard to wrap my head around it. I will say that I definitely need to give it some attention to get it to party with the eleven-six.

    Overall I still have a pang guilt for not going shorter travel but I'm pretty sure I can remedy that with another bike Coming off a long winter of no bikes, it'll be great to get back into riding shape and continue to thrash this beast.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by aussierob View Post
    Am I the only one who thinks this bike is overweight? My XL Following is 3lbs lighter (29lbs) than my XL Wreckoning (32lbs), with exactly the same build (forks weigh the same). Both bikes have X01, Next cranks, 35mm carbon rims & Hope hubs so I there is probably only 1/2-3/4lb to loose by going full weight weenie. I know it has been beefed up for its intended use (and maybe their past woes), but it weighs the same my aluminium Rune with 180mm forks that I use for DH.

    I don't know whether I'm just getting old & unfit, but it the Following feels so much more lively on the flats and hills, like it is pushing you to go faster all the time. The Wreckoning feels almost lethargic in comparison, until it is pointed downhill when it comes alive. Maybe I just need more time on it, but I was hoping it was going to be a LT Following, but it feels more 29er Rune.
    I don't really have this feeling. I always weigh my frames before building, and the XL blue Wreckoning with Monarch came in at 8lbs exactly. For comparison, an XL black Nomad 650B w/Monarch was 7lbs 2oz and a green HD3 w/DBAir (so a lighter shock) was 7lbs 5oz. All weights include headset and rear axle; keep in mind paint will add a few ounces, so the matte black option is probably a tad lighter.

    So yeah the Wreck is a tad heavier but it's a matter of ounces, and of course it's a 29er and it's built to party. To me it absolutely feels like a LT Following, very peppy and fun. Maybe consider different tires? Putting some lighter and faster-rolling rubber on really made this bike climb great.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    I don't really have this feeling. I always weigh my frames before building, and the XL blue Wreckoning with Monarch came in at 8lbs exactly. For comparison, an XL black Nomad 650B w/Monarch was 7lbs 2oz and a green HD3 w/DBAir (so a lighter shock) was 7lbs 5oz. All weights include headset and rear axle; keep in mind paint will add a few ounces, so the matte black option is probably a tad lighter.

    So yeah the Wreck is a tad heavier but it's a matter of ounces, and of course it's a 29er and it's built to party. To me it absolutely feels like a LT Following, very peppy and fun. Maybe consider different tires? Putting some lighter and faster-rolling rubber on really made this bike climb great.
    Thanks for the feedback DrewBird. I normally run Butcher/Purgatory Control tires which are pretty light and offer good all round performance, but I thought I would try Hans Dampfs EVO's this time. I also had to use tubes as they wouldn't inflate without a compressor, and I didn't have a presta adaptor, but I don't know how much difference that makes. I guess the equivalent to the Specialized Purgatory on the back would be the Nobby Nic, so I might try that or just go back to the big S tyres. I would also be interested to try a Slaughter/Rock Razor on the rear (in the dry at least).

    I am surprised that the HD3 frame is only just over half a pound lighter. My XL HD3 weighs just on 29lbs, but has XX1/Next SL cranks/XTR race brakes/741 wheels so pretty light components except for the Marzocchi 350 NCR on the front, and of course smaller wheels.

    I also bottomed pretty harshly through the rocks with the shock at 30% sag, so I will put some volume spacers in, or even put in the DBAir from the Rune so I have a bit more control of the compression settings (high & low). I guess the combination of different tyres, a bit more weight & too soft suspension add up to what I was experiencing. I did have to play around with the shock on the Following (pressure & spacers) to get it just right, so maybe I'm just jumping the gun on judging this bike as a bit of a slug compared to the Following.

  72. #72
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    I'd definitely suggest losing the tubes; not only is that a pound of additional rolling weight, but with the wide carbon rims and lower pressures having a tube in will really make the bike roll slow and generally be no fun. Depending on where and how you ride, the Dampfs should be plenty light but might not last. I've cut several Schwalbe tires and will no longer run SnakeSkin casings on the rear. I've been running Minion DHRII WT on the back and a Magic Mary up front, and have loved that setup. I'd consider going with the DHRII front and back, it rolls great and gives amazing traction on the wider rims. Check it out (and set it up tubeless!)

    I've been running just under 30% sag and have had no bottom-out issues. In fact, with both the Wreck and Following I've never noticed a bottom-out, even when O-ring shows one happened; I think leverage curves are so progressive that I usually just kinda ease into the bottom without feeling a harsh hit. FWIW I weigh ~190lbs ready to ride and have been running 205PSI in my Monarch. That's given a great poppy feel that opens up on bigger hits.

  73. #73
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    I ditched the tubes during the week when I got the compressor fitting, but have not ridden it since. I have just picked up a Slaughter for the rear, so it won't have problems with rolling resistance on back. I have DHRII front and rear on the Rune and they are great also, just a bit heavier. I had given up on the Schwalbes a couple of years ago as they had on/off traction on wet roots, and also fell to pieces, so we will see this time.

    I am about 225lb loaded up - I have 250 psi in the shock so I was surprised when I bottomed heavily - as you say you don't notice it on the Following. I don't know if they are any bands in the shock as standard, but I will be adding a couple for sure.

  74. #74
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    Thanks for all the insights - we will be building one of these as a shop bike. Will ride the stock Monarch Plus to get a feel for the bike itself then will swap to an ElevenSix for a back to back comparison. I've been riding mid/short travel 29ers for a few years now. I'm giving up racing and want to ride bikes that are fun going downhill. I've spent so long on DW Link bikes I'm looking forward to ride something that has a motion rate compatible with a coil shock.
    My one says BRAP!

  75. #75
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    Are you guys finding a need to run 170 mm cranks like many people do on the SC Nomad?



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  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by rondre3000 View Post
    Are you guys finding a need to run 170 mm cranks like many people do on the SC Nomad?



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    My riding has been limited so far but I haven't had issues with 175's yet.

  77. #77
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    Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review

    Just thought I'd share my eleven six solution - did the cable ties and they ate at the housing and paint. Had some left over Velcro and it's don't the trick. Less than ideal but better than nothing!

    Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review-image1461585653.839098.jpg

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  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Truckee Trash View Post
    Just thought I'd share my eleven six solution - did the cable ties and they ate at the housing and paint. Had some left over Velcro and it's don't the trick. Less than ideal but better than nothing!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    My solution from the Build thread
    http://http://forums.mtbr.com/evil-b...l#post12573368
    Page #10, Post #237(not sure about the Hyperlink). Working well so far.
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  79. #79
    wretch
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheCanary View Post
    My solution from the Build thread
    http://http://forums.mtbr.com/evil-b...l#post12573368
    Page #10, Post #237(not sure about the Hyperlink). Working well so far.
    Saw that ... Probably my fall back if / when this stops working. Did you need a longer hose length to route it that way?

  80. #80
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    Short Update: Love this bike more each ride. Pretty much have my 11/6 where I like it now, and waiting on a wheel build to run a Boost Lyrik. Of course, as soon as I spring for the new fork, Luke Strobel shows up at Port Angeles with a Fox 40 29er. Oh well, prolly won't be available anytime soon...if ever.

    FWIW, I've found that for my DH tune, 10 clicks LSC and 16 HSC seems to work for my style and terrain ( 400# spring/175#'s rider weight). I'm not done tinkering, but feel like I'm good to go for most of the local stuff.

    After the Lyrik goes on, I'll post a more thorough reveiw, with totally unbiased impressions, and absolute quanitative metrics analysis stuff...as if.

    In the meantime, if your bored, and want to waste ~13 minutes of your life, here's a video of me today being, and riding like, a deerp.


    https://youtu.be/U58UF23CESY

  81. #81
    LCW
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    Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Apexit View Post


    Maiden voyage on HiLine. Very confidence inspiring on the tech, ledge drop, poop chute backside and climbed pretty decent to the top through all the chunk, switchbacks, etc. Only complaint is that it's slightly less compliant over square edge hits while climbing. Pretty satisfied with the purchase and fun factor.
    Sweet pic! HiLine is a FUN trail!!!

    Looks familiar

    Last edited by LCW; 05-02-2016 at 02:02 PM.

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  82. #82
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    Got in my second ride today - went for some higher speed trails that are still quite technical. Yes this is where the bike really shines, it really shows it's prowess at speeds of at least 15mph, it still tracks great at low speeds, it's just that much suspension and big wheels, it really takes faster vehicle speed to make the suspension come alive.

    I'm running a Fox 36 and Monarch Plus. I'm surprised by this but the Monarch currently feels better than the fork. The fork is very progressive, even with no volume reducers and 65PSI - I'm 170 w/ pack. I will play with even less pressure but am surprised because my previous 36 (at 140) felt less progressive than this fork at higher PSI and with 2 blue volume reducers. I'm also running the compression fully open. Perhaps this is somehow an earlier run with too much damping? Feels like I'm just compensating for a stiff spring though. The Monarch is great and I'm surprised because I've had and seen more issues with RS shocks versus Fox. The shock is planted, I get full travel with no bottom out, and it doesn't wallow through sharp G-outs. I didn't think about it today unless I had to hit the climb mode. I look forward to getting full travel from the fork. I know it can feel good, I'm just annoyed that it's not great out of the box.

    So the fork set up is currently detracting from the experience a bit, simply because I know this bike is going to feel amazing with properly balanced suspension. The bike will see an ElevenSix soon so I'm interested in seeing how to balance the feel of the fork before that shock over cooks the front end even more. I'll post thoughts as they follow.

    The honest - it's not a DH bike. If you like park riding, keep your DH bike. The bike makes up for it because it's still pedal-able. It was a slog today on the gravel, but in fairness I had an over full camelbak and the road was very soft. On tech climbs, it reminds me of a rock crawler, no land speed records will be set but it manufactures traction, even at super slow crawl speeds. Fun to be able to chill on some sections and still pedal! Shrug, that's it - I just wouldn't bill it as a replacement for a DH bike, that's all.

    The stoke - I hit multiple PRs on less than ideal trail conditions (it rained a bit), it's fun but felt safe at speed. They absolutely nailed the compromise between playfulness and stability. Can't wait to get to know it better... more to follow for sure.
    My one says BRAP!

  83. #83
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    Local trails finally drying out. This thing hauls so much ass! Impressed with the Monarch so far but still dialing in suspension a little. The shock does well for me just leaving it in the trail position for everything. Just put a Minion SS on the rear which is pretty awesome with a DHF up front.



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  84. #84
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    Riders using new Shimano cranksets on their Wreckoning (XT 8000)...are you using the new Boost version of the crankset or the standard crankset? I was reading multiple reports mentioning adding spacers to the BB to get chainline right. I couldn't remember if those cranksets were Boost versions or not.

  85. #85
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    This bike rips. So much fun on everything. I'm really impressed how well it climbs for such a big bike. Buddy of mine took these shots yesterday. Nice soft flat corner.









  86. #86
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    Hey guys

    Firstly clearly we all have great taste in bikes!! Personally I have had a few bikes, SB6C,SB5C and an Evil insurgent. I recently decided I needed to drop down to one bike. Yeah Yeah I know the ''trail quiver'' one to rule them all kinda bike doesn't exist........ Or does it !

    I sold all and paid off some of my wife's store cards and got the Wreckoning. So far hands down the best bike I have ridden. PERIOD!!!

    I went all out on my build and I'm well chuffed with it


    Large Wreck
    Race face SIXC bars
    Race face atlas stem
    Race face SIXC Carbon cranks
    Mallet E pedals
    E13 cassette
    E13 Carbon rims
    Pro 4 Hubs
    E13 Tyres
    Odi rogue grips
    XO1 rear mech
    XT M8000 brakes
    Saint ICE discs
    KS Lev integral dropper
    SDG FLY MTN saddle
    Lyrik 160 fork
    Push Eleven Six shock

    In short she is a beaut !!!

    With the standard shock the bike was amazing, XC efficiently, great climber and an absolute rocket when pointed down.

    11-6 shock I have had only one ride and I have kept the shock with the base tunes for the wreck from push. I would say the DH is basically a do it all selection, almost to the point where you don't need the climb option. I need a few more rides but I would consider tuning the climb option to something else, maybe a poppy trail option or a more aggressive DH. I would agree you feel like you sit higher in the travel. I would also agree the shock ''feels'' firmer, I'm not sure it's because it isn't using the travel though. Really strange BUT MAN it's fast !

    Anyways here some pics

    If anyone has any advise on the 11-6 I'd be interested to hear it

    Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review-image.jpg
    Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review-image.jpg
    Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review-image.jpg
    Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review-image.jpg

  87. #87
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    Sweet looking build man. I am also running base tune on my 11-6 but made a few tweaks to the climb mode for more of a trail mode now. Have maybe 4-5 rides so far and bike is everything I thought it would be. Enjoy bro...


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    totally agree on the dh mode for the 11 6 i have not changed it from there even on long clubs, x low and dh mode all the way.

  89. #89
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    Seem to be a number of 11/6 and Lyrik users. How do you feel this compares? I ask because whenever I've done custom on one end of my bike, it's made the other end feel woefully short, and I've recently just done the Lyrik...
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  90. #90
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    Well I am using a 160 Lyrik up front and the 116 is tailored to the bike so I wouldn't say it feels short. It is however a very different feel.

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  91. #91
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    So I've been messing with suspension and tire pressures quite a bit, taking notes along the way and as far as the Monarch goes, It surprisingly rides it's best fully open, at least for me. Does well even on steeper climbs. It matches up well with the Lyrik. Now that I've got it just about where I want it, holy crap this thing rips! It just took a bit to really dial in the sag.


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  92. #92
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    The delta link works best with shocks open. The whole systems creates traction and a good peddling platform so no need to have it closed off. I am currently playing with the tune on my 116 and it feels best when it's wide open

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  93. #93
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    Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review

    Alright, I got 2 days in at Keystone on this, frame in the "low" position. Things that stand out:

    Exit Speed: The rear does an excellent job of staying up in it's travel into bermed corners. It actually feels like a shorter travel bike in this case and is really snappy out of corners.

    Lyrik/Monarch Plus- once dialed in, these pair up really well. One doesn't outperform the other and they both feel great. I originally thought about doing the 11/6, and I'm sure it would even further improve the way the bike rides, but for now the Monarch is working just how I hoped it would.

    Acceleration: I'm just not used to 29ers. I was riding with a friend on his 27.5 who's a bit faster than I am and at one point he says, "Damn it! I can hear you with that hub just gaining on me!" (Pro4 is loud!) Riding behind him, I was working less to maintain speed for sure. Badass!

    Overall, it just feels like a more efficient DH bike. I did a number of laps on Wild Thing and felt more confident and was definitely riding it faster than I could on my old Demo. I would like to try it in the "extra low" position but I'm also running 175 cranks. Has anyone tried the extra low?

    Also, loving the Minion SS on the rear. You'll lose a little braking, but you gain all that speed and it corners great.
    Last edited by ajdemo76; 06-13-2016 at 06:57 PM.

  94. #94
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    Operator please

    This (bike) is wreckin' my mind


    Not much traffic on this thread lately......cause everyone is riding, and not posting I'd bet. That's my excuse anyway.

    Figured I'd share a couple thoughts about the bike while I got some time on my hands.

    1. ajdemo76, I did run the bike in x-low for a couple rides, and unless you are on some groomed trails, I'd leave it in low. I run 170 cranks, and the whole time I had it in x-low, it felt like I was gonna clip a pedal and eat sh!t. I never did, but it was a little unnerving. Maybe with more time, it would have felt more dialed, but the bike works so good in low, I didn't feel the need to continue in x-low. YMMV

    2. I sent my 11/6 in for it's yearly rebuilt, and put the monarch on for a couple rides. Holy Crap. I'll just say that I'm glad to get the Push back on the bike. Matt from Push said that when he pulled the shock apart, it had close to the most wear he'd seen on an 11/6 in for a rebuild, and that I should really notice an improvement in performance when I got it back. Had the first ride on it today, and he was correct.

    Some of you may recall that when I first got the bike, I was chasing the shock setting all over the place. I went down #25 on the spring, which seemed to help the traction, but went back to the #400 spring for mid-stroke support. Matt said that I was on the cusp of a #425 spring, but we agreed to just add a couple turns of preload, and boom, it's just about perfect. This makes sense, as the Following rides best with a pretty high (air)spring weight.

    3. My Following hardly gets ridden anymore.

    Even though 95% of the trails I ride around here are more suited to the Following, and I always have a blast on it, the Wreck just fits me better. When I was hand-wringing over whether to get the L or XL, my main concern was ending up with a slow handling tank of a bike. I am so glad that I listened to Chip, and got the XL. The extra reach and stack are just what I needed in a long travel bike (channeling Greg Minnar). Even though the Wreck is 2" longer, I have no issues with getting the bike to turn in. I may have to lean it a little more, but with the added WB, I get a more centered feeling, and am not chasing the weight bias like a shorter bike. Dunno, it just seems like I can have as much fun on this bike, and when the trail gets rowdy, it leaves the Following behind, NPI.

    I'm keeping The Following, but if they make it longer when they redesign it, and offer something besides the Monarch/Float, I may have some more hand-wringing to do.

    4. If you are a RockShox guy, do yourself a favor and get the Boost Lyrik.

    All for now.

  95. #95
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    Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review

    Great write up!!! I'm so stoked to finally have this bike now and with the 11-6 it just plain rips.


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  96. #96
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    ajdemo76,

    Nice decals! I just ordered some for my Wreckoning. Did your frame come with the black ones that you removed? If so, how did you do it? I'm kind of glad they aren't under clearcoat and they don't look too tough to take off.

    Also, are you shock decals custom? Thanks.

  97. #97
    wretch
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    heat em up - pull em off!

  98. #98
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    Evil Bikes: The Wreckoning - User Review

    Quote Originally Posted by Bunjinjohn View Post
    ajdemo76,

    Nice decals! I just ordered some for my Wreckoning. Did your frame come with the black ones that you removed? If so, how did you do it? I'm kind of glad they aren't under clearcoat and they don't look too tough to take off.

    Also, are you shock decals custom? Thanks.
    Thanks! I just peeled the old ones off. I didn't heat them up but I'm sure that would help. They came off without issues. I got the fork, shock and wheel graphics from Slik Graphics.


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  99. #99
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    Hey Guys, How are most of you using the Bike? Bike Parks, or just trail riding? is it ok to have as a single go to Bike, Thanks.

  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by ray0311 View Post
    Hey Guys, How are most of you using the Bike? Bike Parks, or just trail riding? is it ok to have as a single go to Bike, Thanks.
    TBH, I expected to grab the Wreck primarily for shuttle/lift days with an occasional urge to grab it for just some plain old fun trail rides that I wanted to get rowdier or just charge super fast. I've got a Pivot Mach 429Trail as my short travel, every day trail rig. The truth is that the Wreckoning is much more capable and versatile than I expected. I grab it pretty regularly for trail rides on the same trails I ride the Pivot. It gives up a little in climbing efficiency/speed, but it's not a slow or unpleasant climber, and I'm running an 11/6 on the rear. I think if I had to go down to one bike, I'd choose the Wreck over my Pivot. It's really a damn fun bike!


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