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  1. #1
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    Super D/Enduro Training Regimen

    So besides riding a lot does anyone have a good training regimen? Sprints, lifting, diet etc. Any help would be great.

  2. #2
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    I'd imagine interval training would be a good bet. At least at more of the XC'ish SuperD and Enduro races the ability to push hard for several minutes would be a bonus. Also, I'd think doing some general weight work (power movements, i.e. cleans and snatches) would be a good idea to build total body strength. I've recently started working with Kettlebells almost exclusively and I feel an immediate difference. I've been a power athlete my whole life (former college football player) so I have a love for all things explosive in the gym. I wouldn't waste too much time with the "beach workouts"-you're not trying out for the next season of Jersey Shore after all...

    Otherwise, I'd just work on athletic movements and intense efforts. However, don't forget to throw in some long rides on the bike. A lot of Enduro races can last upwards of 5 hours plus.

    Others will surely chime in with their experience, but I hope that helps a bit! Good luck!

  3. #3
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    Ride lots. To help you ride lots and gain fitness, get a road bike and do a bit of that (hard group rides and the like).

    If you're getting 8-10 hours a week consistently on the bike (of good solid riding, not putting about with friends all the time and that sort of thing), then you could think about adding some strength training or cross training to help muscle imbalances and such. I would ride lift access on the big bike, or get out on the moto with that time though.

    See where I'm going with this? I'm not trying to be a wise ass...the top enduro riders are FIT, like cat 1 or better XC racer fit. You literally can't be fit enough for enduro. Look to how top XC racers train, and then add in specific skills and handling work and you'll be off to a good start.

  4. #4
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    I basically do the same i did when i raced XC, the only difference is that i ride AM on the weekends and try to ride the most technical terrain i can in that time.

    So my "schedule" is something like,

    Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 1.5~2h on my trail bike, technical trail but with a lot of hills ( at least 600m/2k foot )
    Thursday/Tuesday, 2~3h on my light XC bike going as fast as possible
    Saturday, running a few Km's on the beach or road cycling >60km ( depends on wether i'm working in the morning or not )
    Sunday, all day bombing the downhill trail on my Enduro bike

    I also do some light weight lifting on Thursday/Tuesday with focus on my arms and core strength, nothing "serious".

    So yeah, lots and lots of riding on both downhill and uphill terrain.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by danielsilva View Post
    I basically do the same i did when i raced XC, the only difference is that i ride AM on the weekends and try to ride the most technical terrain i can in that time.

    So my "schedule" is something like,

    Monday/Wednesday/Friday, 1.5~2h on my trail bike, technical trail but with a lot of hills ( at least 600m/2k foot )
    Thursday/Tuesday, 2~3h on my light XC bike going as fast as possible
    Saturday, running a few Km's on the beach or road cycling >60km ( depends on wether i'm working in the morning or not )
    Sunday, all day bombing the downhill trail on my Enduro bike

    I also do some light weight lifting on Thursday/Tuesday with focus on my arms and core strength, nothing "serious".

    So yeah, lots and lots of riding on both downhill and uphill terrain.
    no rest and recovery days? a good training plan always has recovery days.

  6. #6
    think
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    Yeah that's definitely a hard man's training plan, haha. I would burn myself up quickly with that strenuous routine.

    On any given week I try to do a long/hard ride or a race on Sunday, a solid 2 hour mountain bike ride on Tuesday, and a fairly sporty (40 @ 21-22 with 1800-2200 feet) road ride on Thursday. Other than that I will either rest as necessary, commute to work (adds 1-2 hours of pedaling with a 45 pound loaded bike for each day commuting), and fit in 1-2 hour mountain bike rides on technical terrain at a casual pace focusing almost entirely on skill/technique work. A routine as hard as Silva's would leave me tired after one week and pretty much shelled after two - perhaps fine if that's the plan.

  7. #7
    derp
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpmjunky View Post
    no rest and recovery days? a good training plan always has recovery days.
    The trail riding is the rest day, it does have quite a bit of hills but 2000ft isn't that much and doing that in 2h means I'm going pretty slowly ( ~10 mph ).
    Just because It's a rest day doesn't mean you stop riding, just means you go slower/easier than usual.
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  8. #8
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    Good info here.

  9. #9
    think
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    For me a rest day means I definitely don't ride. Even if I only ride for an hour the effects of the rest day are mostly lost and I won't be nearly as good the next day.

    Different for everyone though, you have to find what works for you.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad news View Post
    For me a rest day means I definitely don't ride. Even if I only ride for an hour the effects of the rest day are mostly lost and I won't be nearly as good the next day.
    Not doing anything after riding hard is usually bad though, you and your muscles will recover faster if you do light exercise the next day ( recovery day ), like zone 1 spinning.
    Doing a ride where you max average heart rate <68% of threshold HR is usually considered appropriate for recovery days.
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  11. #11
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    What other's have said is right on. You really have to be able to go anaerobic and just keep pushing through some of the short flattish or uphill sections on enduros. The races are often won or lost here.

    Couple other things I would add are working on getting through downhill/techy turns/switchbacks quickly and learning how to read terrain and upcoming turns etc. Nothing really replaces getting some practice runs in on the course but some people are really good at reading a trail and being able to lay off the brakes where they need to, scrub speed where they must, and recover gracefully when they come into something too hot. Practice going fast on unfamiliar trails.

    Intimate knowledge of the trail (almost*) trumps all. As an example, I usually finish very high or win the expert class (no age classes) at my local enduro held on trails that I have literally ridden a thousand times.... yet could only manage a 10th in the Over-40 Amateur class (there wasn't an expert class, just pro) at the Wasatch Enduro despite having ridden most of the course 3-4 times over the past couple years and having some pretty clean, what I thought were fairly fast runs.

    *It's a huge (almost unfair) advantage. Having said that.... I routinely get beat out by faster riders who are seeing the trail for the first time. If you're fast and talented... you're still going to win.

  12. #12
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    Wow, this is starting to sound like a thread from the XC forum! I really had no idea that ppl train this hard for Enduro specifically. I come from a road and XC background and since switching over to DH and Enduro/SuperD have really not trained much at all. I mean I still ride my bike nearly every day and concentrate on skill work, but the specificity of my training is nonexistent. I haven't looked at a heart rate monitor or checked my wattage in ages. That's kind of my favorite thing about this type of riding-it doesn't seem to be dominated by numbers and averages, just going out and having fun.

    I guess what I'm saying is all the "training" is great, but for some people it's all about just having fun and not concentrating on numbers. To each their own though!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pike14 View Post
    Wow, this is starting to sound like a thread from the XC forum! I really had no idea that ppl train this hard for Enduro specifically. I come from a road and XC background and since switching over to DH and Enduro/SuperD have really not trained much at all. I mean I still ride my bike nearly every day and concentrate on skill work, but the specificity of my training is nonexistent. I haven't looked at a heart rate monitor or checked my wattage in ages. That's kind of my favorite thing about this type of riding-it doesn't seem to be dominated by numbers and averages, just going out and having fun.
    Well the thread is about race training specifically after all, so more technical jargon is bound to appear. A friend of mine ride as a pro ( factory racer ) in MX, DH and recently switched over to Enduro, it's pretty common watching him going out on his road bike and catch him at the "gym" with a lot of wires attached to him.

    Of course, if you're only doing things "for fun" none of this is necessary but as soon as you start racing, trying to win and goin against the pro's, these things are almost inevitable no matter what sport you're into


    Quote Originally Posted by Pike14 View Post
    I guess what I'm saying is all the "training" is great, but for some people it's all about just having fun and not concentrating on numbers. To each their own though!
    Well i don't train for XC either if it's just for fun, i even do the occasional XC event but i don't train for it, just show up and ride, sometimes we even stop by the local café mid race for some coffee

    Anyway we're just talking about a simple HR monitor, mine cost 15€ and it's pretty useful to keep me in check during the recovery days ... it's very easy to distract yourself on the trail and next you know, you're over stressing yourself, with the HR monitor if i push too hard it starts beeping and i know it's time to slow down again

    No fancy stuff and you'll be using more exotic stuff than me if you're the type that likes to hit the gym.
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  14. #14
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    A lot of DH pros ride XC and, gasp, road bikes.

    Good example: Andrew Neethling


    Giant Factory Off-Road Team. 2012 Season - Episode 1 with Andrew Neethling - YouTube

  15. #15
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    Exactly what one does for cross racing.
    high leg speed intervals (39 by 17 spin outs)
    lower back strength
    high end of threshold work

    add in riding lots of downhills quite recklessly

    keep your 20 minute power tuned in, and quick legs the entire time. This will give you snap out of corners, and keep you from going anaerobic in high intensity race situations.

    this, and staying stoked, and having some gusto in corners will spell success.


    Good luck,
    Matt

  16. #16
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    20 minute power, endless interval training, and core bike handling skills is a good start. OH and sleep : )

  17. #17
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    Hey, could someone please expand on "high end threshold work" and "20 minute power?" I'm not familiar with those phrases and would appreciate a translation / more info. I can guess, but specifics would help a lot. What would be some examples of these in a typical week? Thanks!
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  18. #18
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    High end threshold is the maximum output you can sustain for over an hour, Endurance pace. By doing work at threshold you teach your body to go long distances at a sustained effort, and learn what this pace feels like so you can know when you are above or below this level of exertion.

    20 minute power is like endurance pace, but for 20 minutes. As hard as you can go for 20 minutes before you explode. (This can be broken down into 15, 10, and 5 minute chunks.)

    By doing work in each of these zones you learn what your body can produce for power in these times before you can't push any harder. For enduro racing the 1 hour mark is important to ensure you can stay fresh throughout the event.
    The shorter yet higher intensity work can be custom tailored to the events you are participating in depending on stage length. Longer stages-> 20 minute power Shorter stages ->5 minute power.

    Out in New England we don't have the big mountains that you get out west so most of my work is done in the 5-10 minute zone. If I were preparing for races in Europe or elsewhere I would concentrate on the 20 minute zone.

    Matt

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by grnbkr View Post
    Out in New England we don't have the big mountains that you get out west so most of my work is done in the 5-10 minute zone. If I were preparing for races in Europe or elsewhere I would concentrate on the 20 minute zone.

    Matt
    Thanks, that's really helpful. Sounds like intervals, just longer and at sustainable power, if I understand you correctly. Many of our climbs out here (SF/Bay Area) are in the 15-20 minute range (1-1.5k') with several linked together back-to-back, so I like this strategy that you're describing. Basically how I always ride! Now I know what to call it...
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  20. #20
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    My training for Super D and Enduro = ****ing pin it!!! Intervals going up and down. Tempo doesn't help much. Being able to focus on hard cornering when your eyes are drowned in sweat and your contact lenses are about to pop out is key.
    99% of the problems and questions posted here would be answered if people actually walked into a bicycle shop and asked

  21. #21
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    I find for myself that just riding on he street is best. If you live in the hills, even better. I ride in pretty steep hills around where I live for 40 minutes straight without breaking and never dipping below 10 mph. If I'm on level ground I sprint my bike as fast as I can to the next street that will take me up. I then keep my speed above 10 mph up consistent steep inclines to the top of the street, then coast down. Then sprint on level ground to my next steep street to go up. Then go up the consistent inclined street to the top and not dipping below 10 mph.

    I do this for 40 minutes straight, three days a week and have found it to work very well. I think its about 6 miles total, can't remember exactly. Do this along with your actual trail riding every week and I think you will be golden. I do about a total of 28 miles every week on my bike; 18 miles on the street and 10 miles on the trails.

    The first race I did this season a literally collapsed after the race; was not in shape at all. A month of doing this and at the end of the second race I was ready to race again. Helped a lot.
    Last edited by camarosam; 08-28-2012 at 08:50 AM.
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  22. #22
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    Training your hands, especially fingers is also very important. For me riding home trails is no problem, since we don't have any higher hills, or mountains nearby. But when ridign the enduro races in the high Alps, the runs might be 20min+ long, so it is really tough for hands if/when not used to this kind of stress(motocross, snow mobile, water jet, those give similar stress to hands). It doesn't really help training your legs and lungs, if you can't hold your hands on the handlebar or use the brake lever whole 20 minutes... :/

  23. #23
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    rock climbing helps a lot with hand strength, and upper body.

    I spend my winters either cooped up in the rock gym, or out skiing, or both.

    clinging to the wall, and some weight work can go a long way!

    Matt

  24. #24
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    BMX, go ride the practice session at your track a couple times a week

  25. #25
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    I was looking into doing my first Enduro and this is what was on their website for a training recommendation, seemed right up my ally.
    I like to train, what do you recommend?
    Go ride your bike. Find a big hill. Ride to the top. Shred to the bottom. Repeat.

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