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  1. #1
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    Preparing for my first Enduro, what training to focus on?

    I'm on my way to taking part in my first enduro race, first mtb race for that matter. My question is what kind of training should I focus on?

    I work full time and manage to get out 1-2 times a week at least until the days get longer. Mostly fun runs that probably max out at 1.5hrs. Should I be focusing on saddle time?

    I took one lesson with a local DH pro, All Mountain Riding School, and am aiming for a couple more lessons before the race to improve my technical skills.

    The race is part of the California Enduro Series at China Peak (read, elevation) June 29th. My aim is to finish, not DNF, and have fun. If I manage to finish close to middle of the pack I'll be stoked.

  2. #2
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    Getting more saddle time once the weather improves would definitely be a benefit to your overall endurance. But you can make the most of your limited time by doing interval intensity training. Also work in the gym. It's amazing how quickly your hands, arms, and back start to spaz out when riding at that intensity. I do a general upper body work out + dead lifts and rotator cuff exercises to protected my bad shoulder. There's also a good thread on training here: http://forums.mtbr.com/enduro-super-...en-808303.html

  3. #3
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    Basic time on bike and from there sprints until you vomit, then sprint some more.

  4. #4
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    No need for crazy training, if goal is just to finish and not DNF. Just go there and have fun!

    One thing you might want to concentrate with training however, especially if you don't have background in riding DH, Moto, snowmobiles or in climbing, is to train your hands to withstand teh vibration and fatigue "hanging on bars & brakes" causes for your hands... That I have found to be the biggest problem on my riding on enduro races, as where I normally ride we don't have much hills, so hands do not get similar "stress" very often.

    It is frustrating feeling when you still would have lots of power in your legs, but basically can't ride as fast as you would like because your hands are burning and its a struggle just to keep your hands on bars...


    But anyways, if you have done regularly some longer descents, then it should not be any problem. Go, ride, have fun! Because that's what it is all about...

    Oh, and single leg squats are great way to train your legs...

  5. #5
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    Maybe try maximizing time on descents, since that is where you will be timed. This may mean hitting your favorite downhill, turning around, riding up it, then doing it again for as long as possible. Your still getting endurance training (the climbing), strength training (the sprinting) but also getting your body adjusted to functioning consistently under adrenaline.

    I'm also coming from an east-coast standpoint too, where our hills are not nearly as big as those out west. I love downhills, but because they are only 15% of my total ride, I'm usually jittery after each one. I wouldn't want to be that way under race pressure.
    I do custom ArcGIS and Google Maps, including data collection and sustainable trail layout. Ride Welsh Mountain

  6. #6
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    This is all really helpful stuff. I am actually in the process of training for the collegiate cycling club at my school. My intention is mostly to have fun, go to cool places, meet some new people, and become a better rider. Winning isn't that big of a deal to me but I am interested in how I'll stack up against other people. I really want to do Super-D events, but in my school's division (ACCC) there are only two places that have a gravity/super-d event (VT and AppState) so maybe its not an option after all. I might actually end up keeping my trail bike and using it to train for xc and super-d until late summer when I'll build up a xc race bike for the xc events. My plan being to race the xc events at each meet but also race the super-d when they're available.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dooms101 View Post
    This is all really helpful stuff. I am actually in the process of training for the collegiate cycling club at my school. My intention is mostly to have fun, go to cool places, meet some new people, and become a better rider. Winning isn't that big of a deal to me but I am interested in how I'll stack up against other people. I really want to do Super-D events, but in my school's division (ACCC) there are only two places that have a gravity/super-d event (VT and AppState) so maybe its not an option after all. I might actually end up keeping my trail bike and using it to train for xc and super-d until late summer when I'll build up a xc race bike for the xc events. My plan being to race the xc events at each meet but also race the super-d when they're available.
    I race in the same division. I race for WVU (although I'm from Richmond, VA) and I mainly do the super-d races. WVU also has a gravity race and a super-d race. Our home race is held at Wisp resort in Maryland. I race on my 5.5 inch trail bike with a dropper post and it does fine for the Super-d courses although a full on enduro bike would be better.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smurphey View Post
    I race in the same division. I race for WVU (although I'm from Richmond, VA) and I mainly do the super-d races. WVU also has a gravity race and a super-d race. Our home race is held at Wisp resort in Maryland. I race on my 5.5 inch trail bike with a dropper post and it does fine for the Super-d courses although a full on enduro bike would be better.
    I just talked to the head of my team here and he said that they only have super-d events at AppState and VT. He might be wrong though, I am pretty sure he's a roadie. Where else do they hold super-d events in our division? I am building up a 5.5" full suspension 650B bike that I plan on using, I suppose a dropper post would help a lot too. Any other info you can give me would be greatly appreciated!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dooms101 View Post
    I just talked to the head of my team here and he said that they only have super-d events at AppState and VT. He might be wrong though, I am pretty sure he's a roadie. Where else do they hold super-d events in our division? I am building up a 5.5" full suspension 650B bike that I plan on using, I suppose a dropper post would help a lot too. Any other info you can give me would be greatly appreciated!
    I'm positive we hold a super-d event at Wisp....I raced in it this past mountain season. If you go to acccycling.org and go to schedule, you can see the events that each school holds and where. There were three super-d events this season, ASU, VT, and WVU. I only raced our super-d and app state's (which you probably ride a lot after creepin' on your profile). You'll be fine on a trail bike. 650B likely will be better. I actually didn't have a dropper post during the season and was fine for the races.

  10. #10
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    Preparing for my first Enduro, what training to focus on?

    As much as I tried to avoid it, I went out and bought a road bike and am working on sprints and mileage. I've also had another riding lesson with Richard Lancaster of All Mountain Riding School ( http://www.allmountainridingschool.com ). Working on my cornering, pumping the terrain, and jumping technique (I suck at jumping). Making progress and looking forward to the VP Kali enduro April 29.

  11. #11
    Formerly of Kent
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    I'd work on 1, 5, 10, and 20min intervals.

    There's a reason why XC guys are beating DH guys in Super D and Enduro races, and it's not because they have better skills. It's because they have better skills when incredibly fatigued.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    I'd work on 1, 5, 10, and 20min intervals.

    There's a reason why XC guys are beating DH guys in Super D and Enduro races, and it's not because they have better skills. It's because they have better skills when incredibly fatigued.
    I would absolutely disagree, take a xc rider and huck them off a 6ft 25ft table at 30mph... they wont get down the mountain. On the EU circuit, DH riders dominate competitive Enduro.

  13. #13
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    Nino Schurter, Adam Craig, Manuel Fumic would certainly disagree with that statement. All of them have top results against DH racers.

  14. #14
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    We'll see come EWS time... how many top ten are former UCI DH competitors.

  15. #15
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    So, you're going to compare the results of current XC and former DH guys, in a series that is run at the same time as the XC World Cup?

    Yeah, that makes perfect sense...

    I have never seen these massive jumps that you describe in any Enduro, by the way.

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