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  1. #1
    InnerF1ame
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    EnduroMTBTraining

    Has Anyone used this? is it legitimate?

    Just got back in the game with a new bike, trying to get rid of the "dad bod" and have some more fun on the trails.

    Would eventually like to start racing.

    Thoughts appreciated!

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  2. #2
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    I have used it, it is legit. I was not patient enough to finish the program because it is a very step by step crawl, walk, walk a bit faster, run program. I tend to enjoy the dive into the deep end and see if I can survive workout style like p90x, insanity, and such. They are NOT enduro training programs just a example of the training style I like. If you are starting at the ground floor then the Enduro MTB training program is a amazing program.

    I do wish he had a at home program with just a ball and dumbells and pull up bar. There is some "gym time" required with this program with some machines . So if you do not have that equipment at home, plan on adding a gym membership to the budget. It's not all ride, and ride more type of training.

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  3. #3
    InnerF1ame
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    Quote Originally Posted by hitechredneck View Post
    I have used it, it is legit. I was not patient enough to finish the program because it is a very step by step crawl, walk, walk a bit faster, run program. I tend to enjoy the dive into the deep end and see if I can survive workout style like p90x, insanity, and such. They are NOT enduro training programs just a example of the training style I like. If you are starting at the ground floor then the Enduro MTB training program is a amazing program.

    I do wish he had a at home program with just a ball and dumbells and pull up bar. There is some "gym time" required with this program with some machines . So if you do not have that equipment at home, plan on adding a gym membership to the budget. It's not all ride, and ride more type of training.

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    Thanks a lot for the response! Are there any "at home programs" that are still bike specific. I am starting at the ground up as far as fitness is concerned. If I had to be specific though, endurance, agility, and balance would all be things that I would assume need to be focused on.

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    Go to Strongfirst.com and check out their forums ("Discuss") there is a thread in there on a program called Simple and Sinister. Also a thread on S&S for mountain biking with good info in it. It's all at home just need a kettlebell. I used it this winter and it works! I've been using kettlebell for years. Take a look at it.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by P_James View Post
    Thanks a lot for the response! Are there any "at home programs" that are still bike specific. I am starting at the ground up as far as fitness is concerned. If I had to be specific though, endurance, agility, and balance would all be things that I would assume need to be focused on.

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    Agility and balance and endurance can come from riding your bike.

    Strength and power come from a real weight training program with basic lifts: squat, deadlift, press, chin ups/rows, and cleans for the advanced lifter. Search strong lifts, 5x5, and do a "reduced" version during the riding season. The beneficial effect heavy lifting has on anabolic hormone release in your body is hard to get any other way.

    Mix in moderate length jogs mixed with hills and sprints.


    It's a proven, repeated recipe in most pro sports...

    Do the sport itself

    Weight training

    Running


    There are no secrets or an easy way out. Short of rehabbing a specific weakness, playing with beach balls, rubber bands, and Dumbbells are a waste of time.

    Pushing heavy iron till you puke and sprinting till you pass out is what successful athletes do.

  6. #6
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    As some others have posted, there is no substitute for lifting heavy ass weight. Look at Jim Wendler's 5-3-1 program; it's an excellent program. Focus on the old school stuff.... Squats, deads, bench, overhead, barbell rows, push-ups, pull-ups/chin-ups, ring dips, sled pushes, kettle bell swings... Forget machines.

    When you look at how pro athletes train it's pretty much the same across the board regardless of sport. Your chosen sport + a good strength and conditioning program = profit.

    The fact is, regardless of what you do, lifting heavy ass weight makes you better at life.

    If you can afford it I would recommend seeking out s good strength and conditioning gym in your area.


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  7. #7
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    Nice call Miker J! Rare to see a cyclist recommend the power lifting basics. As the previous owner of a 600# deadlift and 550# squat I will say he's right, you just can't do them at home as easily. For under $100 you can get a kettlebell and learn the basics; swing and Turkish getup. From there progressing to the snatch, bent press, clean, etc is all very doable from your home and extremely functional and carries relevance over to mountain biking. If you can get to a gym I'd focus on deadlift and squat for lower body, pullups, bent rows, dips and over head press for upper body. If you can't get to a gym, the kettlebell is the way to go. Just my opinion but I've coached, trained, and competed for over 25 years. Good luck brother!
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  8. #8
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    For me I found the very most important factor of racing and getting faster was Super high intensity intervals and teach your body to recover as fast as possible. You can squat, dead lift or curl a bazillion pounds but if it takes you longer to recover then the guy next to you then he is putting power down before you. Even if he cannot put as much at once but more often then he has the advantage while you are sucking wind waiting to recover. teaching your body it only has 20 seconds to recover between maximum efforts makes the most difference I have ever seen on the bike, and I have done many different styles of training. Whatever exercise I do the first " set" " interval" "sprint" is ALWAYS to muscle failure. The 20 second break and repeat. The first bit you be shocked at how weak you are going into the 2nd or 3rd event. But after a bit your body learns to recover fast and next thing you know you are pounding out amazing amounts of power and doing more and recovering faster. But I found that I have to hit that muscle failure wall at first then learn/ teach my body to push to it again with little or no recovery.

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    Thanks for the good advice. At 42 and a recent dropper of 125 pound I have decided to pursue racing in next year's Enduro season in California. I look forward to chatting with yall.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by beddery13 View Post
    Thanks for the good advice. At 42 and a recent dropper of 125 pound I have decided to pursue racing in next year's Enduro season in California. I look forward to chatting with yall.
    Hell yeah dude! Good job.

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    Hell, I bummed it up a bit... found a few races in Temecula that I will be entering before years end! Super excited to get this going.

  12. #12
    InnerF1ame
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    Well, I just started commuting to work, I made my first ride this morning, 12 miles in just under an hr. I am gonna see if I can just keep biking to and from work, if I make the trip 3 days outta the week I'd imagine I'll definitely drop some lbs and gain leg muscle, I wanna get average speed up to 15 mph.

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  13. #13
    RTM
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Strength and power come from a real weight training program with basic lifts: squat, deadlift, press, chin ups/rows, and cleans...Do the sport itself, Weight training, Running

    There are no secrets or an easy way out. Short of rehabbing a specific weakness, playing with beach balls, rubber bands, and Dumbbells are a waste of time.

    Pushing heavy iron till you puke and sprinting till you pass out is what successful athletes do.
    I completely disagree. heavy basics always will play a crucial role but you haven't been paying attention for the past 15 years if you believe there's no place for bosu, power bands, dumbbells, kettlebells and the like. By no means is that the easy way out. This is not me talking either. Check out any current strength/conditioning program from any sport you like.

    that said, I've done and continue to incorporate Dee's Enduro program into my conditioning. Its excellent. I've got plenty of experience in this field. It is my other true passion. But it is very hard to put together an all-encompassing program like this. There's a lot of benefit to having it all laid out, including mobility, cardio, flexibility, power and strength. Run through this program and you wil be better on the bike. It is money very well spent.

  14. #14
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    To Redneck....


    As an aside, for those who are into strength training, but also have the issue of rapid recovery.

    A 20 rep squat variant that may help your wind...

    For those familiar with squats and know their 10 rep maximum weight. Warm up with what works for you. Put your 10 rep max weight on the bar and do your set. Now, don't rack the weight. Keep it on your back until your legs rest enough to do another rep. Do a rep, keep the weight on your back, rep for a total of twenty reps.


    It worked for my wind. Not something I'd advocate for everyone, just a possible variant to maybe address your point.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by RTM View Post
    I completely disagree. heavy basics always will play a crucial role but you haven't been paying attention for the past 15 years if you believe there's no place for bosu, power bands, dumbbells, kettlebells and the like. By no means is that the easy way out. This is not me talking either. Check out any current strength/conditioning program from any sport you like.

    that said, I've done and continue to incorporate Dee's Enduro program into my conditioning. Its excellent. I've got plenty of experience in this field. It is my other true passion. But it is very hard to put together an all-encompassing program like this. There's a lot of benefit to having it all laid out, including mobility, cardio, flexibility, power and strength. Run through this program and you wil be better on the bike. It is money very well spent.
    For the physically fit, non-professional athlete, who maybe wants to compete at the amateur level, but still has a regular job, maybe a house and kids too, with limited time to train, I'd still contend most exercises outside of what I mentioned above, are not time effective, and thus for that person, a waste of time.

    Excpercises that replicate what I'm talking about above, assuming they provide the same intensity, I'd say work too.

    High intensity, I think, is the key to effective, efficient training, for most bikers who want to get fitter for something like enduro racing. I've yet to see exercises outside the "traditional core" lifts/run/sprints, that provide the necessary intensity and pure strength gains to consider them as a replacement.

    By intensity I'm referring to both cardiovascular challenge and moving relatively heavy weights.



    Perhaps I'm coming off as a bit dogmatic. Maybe it would have been better to say that if someone has, say, an hour a day to train outside of biking, doing squats, deadlifts, chins, presses, and sprints, will get them the most bang for their buck.


    That said, I enjoy learning about this stuff, and every body is different, so any input is appreciated.

  16. #16
    InnerF1ame
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post


    That said, I enjoy learning about this stuff, and every body is different, so any input is appreciated.
    ^this^ well said.

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    I appreciate that we are even having this conversation. I started doing intervals during my 3-4 rides during the weekdays and then turning off the training and just ride and have some fun on Saturday and Sunday. I do admit struggling with turning it off but I'm still new at this. I have noticed immediate gains in climbing which lead to more fun on the weekends though. Im also a huge believer that nutrition play a big part of the training process as well. This coming from the new guy... so grain of salt and all!

  18. #18
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    Nutrition is VERY important. I am hyper sensitive to nutrition. I am like 2 different riders depending on what I eat the night before a ride and the day of a ride/ during a ride. I go from leading in the front of the group to barley able to finish the ride and suffering the whole time. So once you figure out what works for your body to preform at its best ( to hell with what books say, every one is written about a persons own body) stick to it. Then you will have quite a few WTF is wrong with me days.

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