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  1. #1
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    Eastern States Cup Enduro and Super D dates.

    Eastern States Cup Blog Archive 2013 Eastern States Cup – Full Schedule – Downhill, Enduro and SuperD

    Enduro Series
    July 6 Plattekill, NY NY State Championship Independence Weekend Bike Gathering
    July 14 Attitash, NH NH State Championship
    July 28 Killington, VT VT State Championship
    Aug 4 Sunday River, ME ME State Championship
    Aug 25 Killington, VT Enduro Regional Championship

    SuperD Races (more to be added)
    May 25 Plattekill, NY NY State Championship
    July 5 Plattekill, NY Independence Weekend Bike Gathering

  2. #2
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    Ya I read every link and everything on that page and I still have NO idea how such an event is structured... where is the info on that? I have never raced before. How does someone start? Are their levels, categories that you begin in and work your way up? Does age matter or perhaps their are certain categories for age too? Do bikes matter within the category? Certain restrictions? Any help would be appreciated, thanks.

  3. #3
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    Uhhh...I'll try to help you out. You pretty much asked "What's enduro?", so I may miss some things

    ESC, like most enduros, is running two categories. Amateur (broken down by age group), and Pro/Open. Being new to racing, you would start out in Amateur. Bikes do not matter within the category. Run what you brung. About the only restriction is that you only use one bike.

    To get started sign up for a race in the appropriate Amateur age group and show up with your bike and normal riding gear. Make sure your equipment is in good order and you are ready to do some work - enduro is very hard! If you are totally new to racing of all types you will likely experience fatigue beyond what you would normally associate with a ride of that distance, and you'll be asking a lot of your bike as you pinball things exhausted at race pace. For this reason if you have the option select wheels, tires, and other components with an eye towards durability. Most of the Pro/Open field is rolling 800+ gram tires with durable sidewalls, and they're generally the best bike handlers at the event. Also remember that you need to be self-sufficient on course and it could be a long walk back, so bring spares and tools as appropriate as well as water and nutrition.

    Most of the specifics of the race will be covered in the rider's meeting. They will explain how you need to navigate the course and other rules and guidelines. Ask questions! Enduro riders (including/especially the Pro/Open guys) are very friendly and welcoming. They will be happy to give you advice or pointers. Generally, you will navigate a course consisting of untimed climbs and timed descents which will test both your skill and fitness. The course will be well marked (In theory, haha) and pretty much all you need to do is pedal. If possible, arrive a day early and pre-ride the course, so you'll know what to expect on race day.

    Don't hesitate to ask people questions. You'll find people are very friendly and welcoming in the enduro scene and will be happy to get you pointed in the right direction.

    Apologies for the disjointed response. I'll type up something organized at some point. Hopefully this gets you started. Mostly just get out and do it to it. You'll learn more in one event than reading 100 crap posts by guys like me

  4. #4
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    Well that crap response was perfect... so perfect in fact... is there any chance I could get you to elaborate on the differences in the organizational aspect of it for the Downhill series? Are there any cost differences, restrictions, ways the races are run or organized? Thanks in advanced!

  5. #5
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    Enduro is new(er), especially to the east coast. This article on Pink bike from a few months back I think is a pretty good overview.

    Beginners Guide to Enduro: What the hell is it? - Pinkbike

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    So basically Enduro is multiple laps of Downhill whether it is peddle to the top or life access to the top and Downhill is just one straight shot a single time? Or is there no difference between downhill races and enduro races?

    Thanks again

  7. #7
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    Enduro courses are specifically designed to be raced on 5-6" trail or all-mountain bikes. You will see people on everything though, including hardtails. The courses will be predominantly downhill but may contain sections of flat or uphill grade. Each venue will have its own flavor based on the terrain available to them.

    This differs from downhill racing where the courses are designed for 8" downhill specific bikes, those courses contain no climbing and very little flat sections.

    Enduros are gaining popularity as they are supposed to be the every mans race with every mans bike, trying to capture the essence of being out with your buddies and timing the funnest downhill portions of a given ride.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaXCarp View Post
    Enduro courses are specifically designed to be raced on 5-6" trail or all-mountain bikes. You will see people on everything though, including hardtails. The courses will be predominantly downhill but may contain sections of flat or uphill grade. Each venue will have its own flavor based on the terrain available to them.

    This differs from downhill racing where the courses are designed for 8" downhill specific bikes, those courses contain no climbing and very little flat sections.

    Enduros are gaining popularity as they are supposed to be the every mans race with every mans bike, trying to capture the essence of being out with your buddies and timing the funnest downhill portions of a given ride.
    Very well said.

    The only thing I would add is most DH races are about 3-4 minutes. The hope with Enduro is to have about 5 different stages of at least 3-4 minutes and hopefully longer. It is more of a day of racing instead of DH which is one run and your racing is over. Although you may be racing for about 20 minutes, you will most likely be on your bike for several hours with the added time to get from the end of one stage to the start of the next.

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