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  1. #1
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    10 year old Sidis are dead. What next?

    My Sidi Dragons have finally gone to shoe heaven.
    Loved them and first thought was to buy the same shoe again, however, I'm pretty much done with XC racing and am pretty locked into AM/FR so I was considering softer, more hike-a-bike friendly shoes.
    That said, I would like to get into Enduro racing so perhaps I do need a somewhat stiffer sole (should I stick with Sidis after all?)
    I need a slightly wide, D width, toe box. (Rules out the Mavic Alpine I've read great things about)

    Anyway, looking for suggestions to put on my short list to try.
    Democracy is two wolves and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    Liberty is a well armed sheep, contesting the vote.

  2. #2
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    Specialized Rime. had them for close to 6 months so far, with no issues. Not the best cold weather shoe though.

  3. #3
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    Stick with the Sidi's. There is nothing better on the market. Different yes, but better no.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    Stick with the Sidi's. There is nothing better on the market. Different yes, but better no.
    Ever walk on rocky terrain with Sidis?
    As good as they are on the bike; that's how bad as they are on the rocks.

    If Sidi came out with a soft lugged Dragon, I'd be all over it.
    Democracy is two wolves and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    Liberty is a well armed sheep, contesting the vote.

  5. #5
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    Yes, we have a lot of rocky terrain. The new SRS soles use a MUCH softer rubber for better traction. I have worn through my SRS soles to the point I need to replace them now after two years ($45 cost). The soles on my old Dominators that I rode for 6 years still look brand new.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    Yes, we have a lot of rocky terrain. The new SRS soles use a MUCH softer rubber for better traction.
    Hmmm. My 6/7 year old dominators are entering the duct tape stage. My pinky toe is working its way through the upper, missing a couple of lugs (my fault as I weakened their adhesion to the sole by carving away some material to try out speedplay frogs). They're the most comfortable shoe I've worn; but was thinking of trying something else due to their lack of HAB performance. I'll have to look in to the new soles.

    Edit: Looks like the SRS is not available on the current dominators. The SRS is available on the Spider and higher pricepoint shoes.
    Last edited by ajdonner; 12-18-2012 at 08:04 PM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajdonner View Post
    Hmmm. My 6/7 year old dominators are entering the duct tape stage. My pinky toe is working its way through the upper, missing a couple of lugs (my fault as I weakened their adhesion to the sole by carving away some material to try out speedplay frogs). They're the most comfortable shoe I've worn; but was thinking of trying something else due to their lack of HAB performance. I'll have to look in to the new soles.

    Edit: Looks like the SRS is not available on the current dominators. The SRS is available on the Spider and higher pricepoint shoes.
    Dominators have never had the SRS system. That's why I always opted for other models, Actions, Dragons, or Spiders.
    The SRS system is well worth it because it makes sole wear a non-issue.
    Democracy is two wolves and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    Liberty is a well armed sheep, contesting the vote.

  8. #8
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    I've been pretty happy with my specialized comps. Stiff but not ridiculous.

  9. #9
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    In euro enduro races DH/BMX style clipless shoes are the norm. I left behind XC style shoes years ago and have never regretted it. I don't feel a difference riding (ie - I don't feel like the slightly softer sole is robbing power or causing friction issues), except my feet are more comfortable after a 4 hour ride. Hike-a-biking is MUCH easier.

    Shoes

    Five Ten | Hellcat

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by gurp View Post
    In euro enduro races DH/BMX style clipless shoes are the norm. I left behind XC style shoes years ago and have never regretted it. I don't feel a difference riding (ie - I don't feel like the slightly softer sole is robbing power or causing friction issues), except my feet are more comfortable after a 4 hour ride. Hike-a-biking is MUCH easier.

    Shoes

    Five Ten | Hellcat
    That's what I've been hearing. I've been seeing a lot of guys on those Shimanos.
    I've also heard really good things about the Mavic Alpine XLs.
    Democracy is two wolves and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    Liberty is a well armed sheep, contesting the vote.

  11. #11
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    I've ridden with the 661 shoes similar to the Hellcats and got a gnarly hot spot after 10 miles... The sole was too flexy... Guessing the Hellcat's are stiffer...

  12. #12
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    Any advantage to a dh style clipless shoe/pedal combo (say Shimano AM45 and CB Mallet) over an xc style (say Sidi Dominators and SPDs) combo while riding?

    I've spent many years riding and racing with xc shoes/pedals. The past few months I've been riding flats in an effort at skills improvement. It's been a great experience all around, and particularly surprised by the improved cornering feel. However as race season approaches, I know I'm faster clipped-in, especially on the typically rocky courses I'll be on. Does a dh style clipless shoe/pedal combo preserve some of that flats feel, especially cornering? I'm not really concerned about hike-a-bike, comfort, or getting back in the pedals at speed...all that, while not always ideal, was fine with the xc combo.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mxwit View Post
    Any advantage to a dh style clipless shoe/pedal combo (say Shimano AM45 and CB Mallet) over an xc style (say Sidi Dominators and SPDs) combo while riding?

    I've spent many years riding and racing with xc shoes/pedals. The past few months I've been riding flats in an effort at skills improvement. It's been a great experience all around, and particularly surprised by the improved cornering feel. However as race season approaches, I know I'm faster clipped-in, especially on the typically rocky courses I'll be on. Does a dh style clipless shoe/pedal combo preserve some of that flats feel, especially cornering? I'm not really concerned about hike-a-bike, comfort, or getting back in the pedals at speed...all that, while not always ideal, was fine with the xc combo.
    That's the exact situation I'm in. I went to flats with 5.10s last season on my big bike and after hating it for a while, eventually really liked them. I still prefer being clipped for AM and want to race Enduro this coming season.
    I pulled the trigger on the Mavic Alpine XLs (couldn't pass them up at Jenson for $70)
    I've worn them once in really cold weather but I think they'll be OK. I will definitely miss that perfect, made just for my feet, fit I got with the Sidis, though.
    Democracy is two wolves and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    Liberty is a well armed sheep, contesting the vote.

  14. #14
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    Why not stick with the Sidis then? Just curious since I cannot imagine moving to anything else, but maybe I am missing something.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    Why not stick with the Sidis then? Just curious since I cannot imagine moving to anything else, but maybe I am missing something.
    Like I said in the OP, I'm looking for something a little more hike-a-bike freindly.
    If Sidi ever decided to make a shoe with a sole that wasn't plain dangerous to walk with on rocky terrain, I'd be right there.
    Democracy is two wolves and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    Liberty is a well armed sheep, contesting the vote.

  16. #16
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    Have you considered the Specialized BG Pro Carbon.
    I am on my second pair. Pretty easy to hike a bike with them.
    I would consider them to be a Trail shoe: heavier than an XC clipless shoe, but can be worn all day comfortably.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by saidrick View Post
    Have you considered the Specialized BG Pro Carbon.
    I am on my second pair. Pretty easy to hike a bike with them.
    I would consider them to be a Trail shoe: heavier than an XC clipless shoe, but can be worn all day comfortably.
    Don't get me wrong, there's nothing wrong with the Mavic fit. They're fine.
    It's just that nothing, and I mean nothing, fits like a Sidi. They spoil you for other shoes.
    They're like Faragamo slippers with carbon soles.
    Democracy is two wolves and a sheep voting on what's for dinner.
    Liberty is a well armed sheep, contesting the vote.

  18. #18
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    That's cool. I have not heard anything good or bad about Mavic, they're new to the shoe game. Hope they work out for you.

  19. #19
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    Retired my 10 year old Sidi Dominators to thicker sock winter type riding last month. Replaced 'em with Shimano 240L simply due to the fit and feel in the shop while walking around. I've had Sidi's for 20+ years and the Shimano's just felt more comfortable. My road shoes are Specialized carbon sole something and I just liked the fit of the Shimano's over Specialized, Sidi and Bontrager. Just my experience.
    The other thing I realized is that 10 years out of a pair of cycling shoes is likely too long. When I bought my new shoes I thought I needed a different size, only to realize that my Sidi's were SO stretched out. We'll see how long the Shimano shoes last but I'll try to remember to replace around the 5 year mark or less.

  20. #20
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    Re: 10 year old Sidis are dead. What next?

    Try the Giro Codes. I tried all kinds of shoes including the Sidi Dominator. The Giro Codes felt great. No complaints.

  21. #21
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    I had vibram soles put on mt old Sidis for $75. What a great shoe. My new ones go on the road or if I am parading at some Mtb PR event.
    I don't rattle.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike View Post
    I had vibram soles put on mt old Sidis for $75. What a great shoe. My new ones go on the road or if I am parading at some Mtb PR event.
    How/where did you get the vibram soles done?

  23. #23
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    another vote for giro codes. I also was a diehard side dominator guy and mine were in the 10 year old range but still in good shape when I decided to change. For me the motivating factor was the carbon sole. It really is a huge difference on the pedals terms of feel.

    I do kind of miss the "italian" shoe vibe, but new sidi's are really expensive compared to other solid options like the code. I've also noticed that Northwave shoes are well priced for the features. (I got some artic GTX for winter which is why I notice how much better carbon soles are)

  24. #24
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    I rode nothing but Sidi since 1991, but found myself in the exact same boat as the OP. I tried a low end pair of Mavics on close-out, sight unseen, which felt pretty good at first but were too soft (uppers and sole) and the straps weren't angled quite right, which I think contributed to some foot problems I developed. These were one of their first year shoes, and showed a lot of potential.....I'd try them again with a newer, higher end version, if there was someplace around here where I could try them on first.
    I ended up going with the Shimano 240's, which are stiff as all-get-out, beefier lugs and better toe protection than Dominators, and they fit ALMOST as well, but not quite. They're custom moldable, but can't find any shops that do that either, so I've been riding them fairly happily for a year. Compared to the dominators they'll fit the same foot shape pretty similarly.... the beefier sole helps with HAB, but the toe is much stiffer, doesn't have the sidi flex, so I wouldn't race cross in them. I'd say the fit is adequate for a sidi-phile, but not superb, and certainly not sidi-slipper-like.
    I wish Sidi would just do a model with a little heavier material on the toe and lateral side of their uppers, and more grippy rubber lugs on the bottom....basically an Enduro SRS model.

    Edit: of course, what I'm describing would probably be a $400+ shoe, lol

  25. #25
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    Totally different from anything sidi makes... the new Teva Pivots look really interesting to me....seem like a good cross over shoe for trail riding, enduro, commuting, pub crawling...basically everything but XC racing.

    TevaŽ Pivot for Men | Clipless Bike Shoes at Teva.com

    The Pearl Izumi X-Alp Enduro III looks promising too

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