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  1. #1
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    Training after 32.

    I feel like this is the maximum age for the NFL. Any tips for avoiding a winter weight gain or competing?

  2. #2
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    Stay out of the NFL, it will ruin your knees. But seriously, and listen to this: you are not even close to being old, you've got 20 years minimum to be really fast, probably more like 30, - but your pro career is probably over Unless you're a good cat1 or better, you can improve for many years. As for winter weight and competing, pre-reg for late winter & early spring races, knowing that those are coming up should help keep you focused.
    carry clippers! cut something off the trail every time you ride.

  3. #3
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    In the cycling community you will find lots of people racing in their 40s and 50s who say they are faster then they have ever been.

    I am 41 and much faster then I was in my 20s. Secrets, train regularly, ride long, go really hard once in a while and eat when you are hungry.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  4. #4
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    Granted, I got a late start to this suffer party, but my strongest two years were age 50 and 51.

    So, at 32, your age is approximately zero consideration.
    Whining is not a strategy.

  5. #5
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    Echoing the old farts here. I have been MTBing for 20 years and at 54 I am the strongest I have ever been. For me it's been more time in the saddle and proper recovery and nutrition.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G900A using Tapatalk

  6. #6
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    I'll also chip in for someone who's your exact age, 32. I started back cycling 4 years ago and now, at 32 after starting structured training and looking at what I fuel with, I'm the fittest I've ever been and am only getting stronger.

    I felt like I'd plateaued after a couple of years and wasn't seeing any improvement. Turns out I just wasn't stressing my body properly. If you're fresh to cycling, just start riding for fun. When your get to that point that you're starting to plateau then look at doing some structured, quality training and you'll reap the benefits.

  7. #7
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    32?! Unless you're a pro cyclist who hangs on MTBR, then you have plenty of life left in you.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  8. #8
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    32.. ha ha.. just a punk kid at 32. (I am 43) Seriously you have a solid 20-25 year before you will be "slow". As you get older you will need to be more focused as you can't just party all night and race the next day any longer, but with age also comes the maturity to deal with that. The only bad thing is it will take longer to heal from a crash.


    Now if you want to be top level UCI world cup pro then you are too old. Then again I am sure Tinker Juarez can still kick my butt pretty easily and he is now really old.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoePAz View Post
    Now if you want to be top level UCI world cup pro then you are too old. Then again I am sure Tinker Juarez can still kick my butt pretty easily and he is now really old.
    Yup, Tinker may be old, but he isn't slow.

    Last year, he got lost in the Butte 100, so jumped into the 50 well after the start, and either unofficially won, or came darn close to it.

    Inspirational!
    Whining is not a strategy.

  10. #10
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    Im about to turn 37 and this is my best year yet for endurance and overall physical conditioning and Im heavier currently than I was when I was training a few years ago.

    I know guys that race in their early 60s.

    My advise though, dont overdo it. Pushing too hard for too long can be as harmful for you heart as not doing enough. Not a concern now but could become one down the road.

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  11. #11
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    Kabush is 41 and still crushing it

  12. #12
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    Jens Voigt (road) still raced into his 40's and killed it.
    Stick around if you're housebroken...

  13. #13
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    At age 32, your recovery time is more important, and your diet is more important, as your body is less tolerant of of abuse and requires more rest. Apart from those two things, 32 is still pretty young for cycling as it's not nearly as hard on your joints as football.

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    I assume this was a joke/troll?

    I really got into endurance sports at 25 (triathlon at the time) and am 33 now. You're in the endurance boards so I'm assuming your racing long events, and those have gotten consistently easier for me with age. I don't think I train half as hard as I used to, but find that I can just grind out longer events with less and less stress now that I have ~10 years of endurance training sort of baked in.

  15. #15
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    Deadly Nedly at 60 can still destroy 98% of the mountain bikers out there. Especially going up.

  16. #16
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    46 and still getting faster

    I got into XC 3 years ago after a 10 year sports starved stint while our kids grew up a little. I've always been athletic, mostly football (soccer), tennis and Windsurfing, but I did a triathlon or two in my teens. At 46 I am now racing in local Catalan (Spain) XC marathons. Hoping to make the podium overall this season in the Master40 class. What works for me: make a training plan, if you don't know how, get some help. Eat when you're hungry (like said before) but watch the bad stuff. Since I started that last year I increased my FTP from 250 to 285 and it's still climbing.

    Since I started cycling I have not been sick a single day. That means no cough or flu, which is quite something in a house with 3 kids bringing home all sorts of germs and viruses.

    I will never make to the top step since I sometimes have to deal with the likes of Josep Betalu, who won the last edition of the Titan Desert. He's 41 and at the finish line before most of us pass the half way point :-)

    I expect to have fun on my MTB for at least another 10 year, hopefully more.

  17. #17
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    The OP must have meant this as a joke (the NFL reference) or was just being provocative, which is fine I guess.

    I'm more than 20 years past 32. I'm not the fastest I've ever been, but I ride a lot smarter than I ever did. I know how to prepare for every ride, how to quickly adapt if I was a little wrong, and know every strategy, every trick, and know my body extremely well, my strengths, weaknesses, powers, and limitations. I read courses, terrain, conditions, and other riders better than I ever did, and I'm certain a lot better than you do. That's what 30 years of riding does for you.

    I frequently ride in groups with people in their 30's, and younger, on the road, and MTB, and have no trouble keeping up with most of them. Not all, no, but most. Since you have 20 years to practice this, when you get into your 40's there's no reason you can't be a Cat 1/Elite if you wanted, possibly winning some races at that level. Plus find yourself on a sponsored team, which comes with support and some freebies, and making a little money on the side.

    As JoePaz and JoeDuda pointed out. Tinker Juarez is older than me and still competes at the Pro/Elite level. He was 2nd in the brutal Freetown 50 just two years ago. Not second on the 50+ class, second overall. Ned Overand could kick all our asses on almost every course that wasn't predominantly downhill, and he's in his 60's.

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