Results 1 to 20 of 20
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    36

    Technic for eating on 6 hour endurance races

    I am going to do my 1st 6 hour endurance race at the 6 hours of Halloween in Santa Ynez in October. I have some questions about refueling. I've done lots of centuries (Death Ride/Breathless Agony, etc.) so I know what I need to do to eat on a long, hard ride. I've done some 50-60 mile mtb rides but these were not races nor laps. I've raced shorter mtb races.

    After all that, here's the question: I have one bottle cage on my mtb. I expect to do 4-5 laps at 75-90 minutes per lap. I can get new bottles each lap and some food. Do people stop at the feed zones? I know you have to check in on each lap as you go by. I don't want to take a camelbak if I can get by with the bottle and food in my pockets most of the way, however, one bottle may not last me 90 minutes and I don't want to dehydrate. How do people handle refueling logistically?

    Looking forward to doing several of these over the next year.

    Thanks for the input.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    255
    Put an extra bottle cage on your bike or carry an extra in your Jersey. Still lighter than a camelback.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    189
    Try riding for 90+ minutes and see how your doing on water. If your out before that then you need to carry more. . .

    +1 for not using a CB unless you have to. I love mine, but it only gets used when there are no 'refill' stations. or if its really cold or rainy and I need to carry extra layers.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RSW42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,093
    Quote Originally Posted by robertdavid View Post
    or carry an extra in your Jersey. Still lighter than a camelback.


    I've done that before...a regular sized bottle in the cage, and a smaller bottle in a jersey pocket. I hit and kill the small bottle first, then work to the cage.


    Have a great ride!
    .




    .

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mudge's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    1,149
    Quote Originally Posted by robertdavid View Post
    Put an extra bottle cage on your bike or carry an extra in your Jersey. Still lighter than a camelback.
    If your bike won't accommodate a second cage, you could look into mounting a second bottle on the seatpost. Specialized has some nice mounts in 27.2 or 30.9 that work great. Depending on your local dealer, they may run you about $9 a pair, or they may just give them to you. They don't order them, they come with some of the new bikes, but most buyers don't want them, so the shop usually has them laying around.

  6. #6
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,996

  7. #7
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    14,284
    I staged some stuff in the base area. I prefilled bottles for myself so I could raid my bag very quickly and not have to wait in line.

    For me, 90 minutes would be a little long for one bottle. I'd take two. Others have already talked about how to get 'em on the bike.

    If you can talk someone into supporting you, I think it would be very helpful. For me, it was a SRAM demo crew. Probably the most pro I'll ever feel. :-P They even gave me a demo bike to finish on when I buggered up my drivetrain.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RSW42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,093
    Another good habit:

    When you are rolling into the pit area, and know you are going to take on another bottle, kill the one you have. I've been guilty of dropping half-full bottles, and getting behind on hydration at times.

    This will help, BELIEVE ME LOL



    .
    .




    .

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    11
    My current bike also has only 1 water bottle cage. For longer races I've been using a small 50oz camelbak (2 water bottles worth) with water and electrolytes, and a water bottle with some sort of liquid calories. The camelbak is easier and quicker to drink from over the water bottle for me so I am more likely to consume at regular intervals. Dealing with the water bottle on bumpy terrain slows me down. The disadvantage is filling up a camelback can be slow unless you have 2 and a helper to swap. I hate the feeling of getting passed at feed stations.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    36
    Nelsonik makes a good point. I only have one bottle cage, and getting the bottle out is not easy. Drinking from a bottle on a mountain bike is a lot different than on a road bike. I will have someone in the pit area helping so I could have them swap camelbaks or bottles.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    36

    How do I tell pit crew I'm coming?

    My next question is how to communicate with the pit crew. My wife and mother-in-law (yes!) will be my pit crew, but how will they know I'm almost there? Do I just show up and tell them what I need? Does anyone use radios/walkie talkies to talk to the pit crew?

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: RSW42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    1,093
    Quote Originally Posted by jdcowboy View Post
    My next question is how to communicate with the pit crew. My wife and mother-in-law (yes!) will be my pit crew, but how will they know I'm almost there? Do I just show up and tell them what I need? Does anyone use radios/walkie talkies to talk to the pit crew?

    Did a team 24 hr a while back and we tried radios...a total no-go.

    Maybe some smart phone apps can track other smart phones? I dunno.


    Nowadays I just wear something distinctive that my crew knows is me. Plus, I just let them know to time my first lap and go from there.


    hope this helps,


    R
    .




    .

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    2,728
    For my last 5+ hour race I and many others used the 50 oz CB plus 1 bottle. I've always been told to carry 1 bottle just in case something happens to my CB hose or bite valve, and to carry the CB in case my bottle falls out. I'm not a big CB fan, but the 50 oz version is pretty light and a valuable tool for my longer rides. Anyway, drinking is easier for me (Garmin set for every 10 or 12 minutes as reminder) from a CB especially when my mind is turned off and I forget all the basics, ha. Then work on bottle. Coming into pits I'll replenish with new large bottle.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    7
    Any suggestions for general support for a solo rider on a 10 ish hr race? What type of setup do you use in the support area? I typically have a cooler with a few extra bottles in my car when I ride 3 -4 hours, but the car will likely not be close. I would also like to have extra jersey, light jacket, ect. The race sponsor indicated setting up an area by securing the a 10x 10 area with a moose.

  15. #15
    It's carbon dontcha know.
    Reputation: 6thElement's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    3,713
    Quote Originally Posted by TimSB View Post
    The race sponsor indicated setting up an area by securing the a 10x 10 area with a moose.
    Heck if you've got a trained moose to act as your pit crew no one is going to mess with your gear.
    Rolling on 29", 650b, 8.3" and 23mm

  16. #16
    It's carbon dontcha know.
    Reputation: 6thElement's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    3,713
    edit: double post.
    Rolling on 29", 650b, 8.3" and 23mm

  17. #17
    Interplanetary Poultry
    Reputation: scatterbrained's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    220
    This depends on the course and the amount of support you have. I've done it a few different ways: one, they can just look at the average times and expect you at a certain interval. This works fine so long as nothing unexpected pops up.

    If the course is laid out in such a way where they can position themselves to be able to see you coming ahead of time it will help them to be ready. The problem is what you where to stand out might look like what someone else wore to stand out as well.

    Another thing you can do is to have one of your crew members walk to a point about 5 minutes ride up the trail, preferably to a slow section. You can communicate your needs to them and they can relay it to your pit either with cell phones or walkie talkies. Radios are better than cell phones for this if you have them.

    As far as hydration and food go, I've always preferred the camelbak, partly because it stays clean, partly because it keeps the weight off the bike, and partly because if I eat **** it helps protect my back. Not to mention that before the advent of the Camelbak I was known to send water bottles rocketing out from under my bike as I tend to have a fairly aggressive riding style. With the Camelbak it's just right there next to my face, and it's not going to fall off. If you don't mind looking a bit geeky the new fanny pack has been pretty well reviewed. . . . . . . .

    Any endurance race I've done that was less than 8 hours I rode straight through. I would just put a few CifBars (or powerbars, fig newtons, bannanas, etc) in the back of my jersey or in the camelbak. For energy bars just crack the wrapper open so your not fighting with it while riding.

    Be sure to eat at regular intervals. If you start to feel hungry it's already too late.
    Editor In Chief, "Internet Tough Guy Magazine"
    "Home of Chuck Norris' Keyboard"

  18. #18
    Interplanetary Poultry
    Reputation: scatterbrained's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    220
    Quote Originally Posted by TimSB View Post
    Any suggestions for general support for a solo rider on a 10 ish hr race? What type of setup do you use in the support area? I typically have a cooler with a few extra bottles in my car when I ride 3 -4 hours, but the car will likely not be close. I would also like to have extra jersey, light jacket, ect. The race sponsor indicated setting up an area by securing the a 10x 10 area with a moose.
    Drink about a half gallon of water on your way there while munching on asparagus spears. Then pick your spot, whip out your organic pant feeding utensil, and mark your territory. Or you could just lay out a perimeter of feed for your moose. . . . . . .

    Normally when running solo for shorter events (sub 12hrs) just try to find a spot that is near a lot of other pits and set up. Talk to the people set up around you. Get a feel for them (which isn't the same as feeling them up) and let them know what you're doing; i.e. riding solo. Most people won't have a problem keeping an eye out for your kit, and many would be more than happy to lend a hand. Mountain bikers tend to be a friendly and helpful bunch when you meet them in the real world.
    Editor In Chief, "Internet Tough Guy Magazine"
    "Home of Chuck Norris' Keyboard"

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    751
    Quote Originally Posted by RSW42 View Post
    Another good habit:

    When you are rolling into the pit area, and know you are going to take on another bottle, kill the one you have. I've been guilty of dropping half-full bottles, and getting behind on hydration at times.

    This will help, BELIEVE ME LOL



    .
    This is an excellent piece of advice. I always make sure I kill the bottle I'm about to swap out. Camelbacks are a viable option though it's very hard to gauge how much fluid is left in the CB. I find I don't drink enough when I wear my pack. I guess the fear of running out of fluids make me drink more conservatively.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    740
    Organization is key. I saw someone use a hanging shoe holder to put their stuff. I saw someone neatly lay everything out on a table, but they tried to grab it without stopping and knocked everything off the table. I also see bottle holders that are attached to a stake and hold 6-8 bottles. Baggies are your friend - package things in small amounts. Take the top off your bananas so they are easy to peel. Tape Gu's to your bike.

    If you have support, generally they know when to look for you based on your lap times. In one race, the course went very close to the pit about 1/2 mile before hitting the pit, so I could let them know what I wanted and they'd have it for me when I went by the pit.

Similar Threads

  1. Peaking for endurance races vs XC races
    By 29ger in forum Endurance XC Racing
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-16-2013, 05:57 PM
  2. 575 for endurance/24 hour races?
    By Lhotse in forum Yeti
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-02-2011, 03:54 AM
  3. Eating for Endurance
    By Care in forum Nutrition and Hydration
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-17-2011, 11:16 AM
  4. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-26-2011, 01:55 PM
  5. Any 24 Hour races
    By mtnbkr33 in forum Great Plains - OK, KS, NE, SD, ND
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-25-2011, 03:14 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •