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  1. #1
    The Original Suspect
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    Looking for some advice.

    Myself and three friends are doing the 12 hours of Papago in Tempe, Az in January. None of us have ever raced before. Here the question: What are some racing etiquette issues we need to pay attention to and avoid violating as noob racers? We are taking it seriously but know as a bunch of “old men” we really won’t be competing for the win and thus, mainly doing it for fun. That being said, we don’t want to be a hindrance to the guys trying to seriously compete. We plan on alternating laps and we have the benefit of training on the course ahead of time because it’s practically in our back yard.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    you will probably let people pass mu7ch easier than you really have to.....

    Doing so will probably increase the fun factor...

    If you really know the course... later on in the race you will probably start to have to pass some people....

    All that easy passing at the start will be paid back then.

  3. #3
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    If you hear people coming up from behind you don't turn around and try to guess their next move. Hold your line and they will get past you without any issues. Thats what fast people do. If they ask to get around you chances are they will pass you on your left and not your right.
    Another helpful hint is practive your water and food intake when you train, it's a big part of endurance racing.


    Quote Originally Posted by HitmenOnlyInc View Post
    Myself and three friends are doing the 12 hours of Papago in Tempe, Az in January. None of us have ever raced before. Here the question: What are some racing etiquette issues we need to pay attention to and avoid violating as noob racers? We are taking it seriously but know as a bunch of “old men” we really won’t be competing for the win and thus, mainly doing it for fun. That being said, we don’t want to be a hindrance to the guys trying to seriously compete. We plan on alternating laps and we have the benefit of training on the course ahead of time because it’s practically in our back yard.

    Thanks!

  4. #4
    The Original Suspect
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    Ok to elaborate on nutrition and hydration: The course is about 7.2 miles, so less than 40 min of riding time, give or take. Camelback or water bottles? I am sure I won't go through more than a liter in that time. Since there are four of us and we plan alternating, ride one lap, sit three. How much should we be eating and drinking during our "down" time? And what?

  5. #5
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    I dont have much race experience but I have ridden and raced this course. my opinion is .... Bottle definitely. Also, there are definitely some places on the course that make for easy passing, and others where passing is impossible, so be smart about that. Train on the course a few times and you will figure that part out. Also, do a lot a lot of trail riding on a lot of different local tracks to get used to pedaling and riding in a variety of situations, which will be good prep for the race. Have fun and we are interested in hearing how it goes.

  6. #6
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    I always assume I can see the trail in front of me better than the racer behind me who is trying to pass me. To make it easy on everyone, I look for the best place for the pass and let the overtaking racer behind me know when/where I plan to pull over. Most people are really appreciative and the pass goes much more smoothly. Minimal chance for screw up or conflict.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mudge View Post
    I always assume I can see the trail in front of me better than the racer behind me who is trying to pass me. To make it easy on everyone, I look for the best place for the pass and let the overtaking racer behind me know when/where I plan to pull over. Most people are really appreciative and the pass goes much more smoothly. Minimal chance for screw up or conflict.
    IMO, this perfectly captures the spirit of endurance racing. If somebody catches you, they are faster. Let them by. They will probably return the favor later in the race, if the need arises.

    I was once told that the list of endurance racing rules and etiquette is "don't be a dick". End of list.
    The drive towards achievement and success is the motive power of civilization.

  8. #8
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    Another thing you may consider for the nite laps is doing two back to back instead of alternating. That gives the non riding teammates more rest time and w/ a 40min lap, you are just getting used to the nite and the lap is over, doing two back to back lets you stay in the groove of nite riding and you get a (40min x 2) X 3 = 240min = 4 hour rest, as opposed to 2, 2hour rests, and having to do a nite lap, come in, get cold, and then go back out.

  9. #9
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    I would be interested to hear what you thought of the experience. The 12 Hours in the Papago was my first Mtb race in 20 years and first ever team endurance race. When we all rolled up in the same car we looked around and realized our attitude was pretty laid back compared to a lot of people racing there. That said, I only got yelled at once and I deserved it for not paying attention. Otherwise I thought the whole experience was awesome.

  10. #10
    The Original Suspect
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    Quote Originally Posted by cwalton View Post
    I would be interested to hear what you thought of the experience. The 12 Hours in the Papago was my first Mtb race in 20 years and first ever team endurance race. When we all rolled up in the same car we looked around and realized our attitude was pretty laid back compared to a lot of people racing there. That said, I only got yelled at once and I deserved it for not paying attention. Otherwise I thought the whole experience was awesome.
    Yeah, I would half to say there were people there who were very serious. Not to say my team wasn't, we just knew we weren't going to win. I thought the experience was awesome! Red Rocks put on a good event and I thought it went very smooth.

    I just went out and rode my race and when people needed to pass I got out of the way. I had the luxury of riding the course for a couple of days before the event so I knew where I might have issue.

  11. #11
    Rod
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    Quote Originally Posted by HitmenOnlyInc View Post
    Yeah, I would half to say there were people there who were very serious. Not to say my team wasn't, we just knew we weren't going to win. I thought the experience was awesome! Red Rocks put on a good event and I thought it went very smooth.

    I just went out and rode my race and when people needed to pass I got out of the way. I had the luxury of riding the course for a couple of days before the event so I knew where I might have issue.
    That's really all you can do. When you show up for a race you will find some people take it extremely serious while others are just out there to have fun. In any event just do what you can, have realistic expectations, and have fun. On your left and rider up would probably be common things for someone to expect while racing. This wasn't mentioned earlier.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

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