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Thread: Leadville 2017

  1. #1
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    Leadville 2017

    Who's in?

    I'm in via lottery at this point. I'm looking forward to improving my corral position at Austin and perhaps Tahoe.
    TTUB - Ventura County California

  2. #2
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    I'm in too and really looking forward to it. Ill be at Austin as well. Austin is a great one to do early in the season because there isn't a whole lot of climbing and provides a great opportunity to get a good corral position. However I like to be in one corral back from where I qualify just to stay in check at the start of the race. Everyone likes to hammer the start and if you get caught up in that you'll pay the devil his dues later on.

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    I got in last year on the giveaway coins at Tahoe and deferred for this year and I'll be racing Tahoe again to improve the corral position.

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    I'm in from the Barn Burner lotto with 8:25. Shooting for sub 9. Im stoked about this one, should be a good one.

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    Ill be there, got in through the drawing from the Rattler in 2016 , doing the Rattler again this year , shooting for sub 5 hrs, was in the purple LT corral in 2016 , Shooting for just under 11 hours at the 2017 LT100. Looking forward to Lutsen, and the LT stage race again.

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    Wife and I thinking about doing Tahoe for fun in itself and maybe for LT100 year thereafter. I can't find any info on lottery odds at qualifier nor what kind of times/fitness one needs to qualify for men or women.

    Thoughts? Thx.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HEWSINATOR View Post
    Wife and I thinking about doing Tahoe for fun in itself and maybe for LT100 year thereafter. I can't find any info on lottery odds at qualifier nor what kind of times/fitness one needs to qualify for men or women.

    Thoughts? Thx.
    Depends on your age bracket. In the 40-49 bracket, you need hit around 5:15 to qualify outright at Tahoe, but there are usually lots of slots left over for the people that stick around.

    IMO, go race Tahoe and have a good time, stick around for the drawing. Chances are you will probably end up with a slot, and Tahoe is a fun race anyways. I'd do it even if I wasn't trying for a slot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HEWSINATOR View Post
    Wife and I thinking about doing Tahoe for fun in itself and maybe for LT100 year thereafter. I can't find any info on lottery odds at qualifier nor what kind of times/fitness one needs to qualify for men or women.
    Thoughts? Thx.
    I agree with Udyr. Stick around, good things happen to those who wait!

    I gained entry via the lottery last year also. Then, I raced Tahoe for corral position. I did a 6:00 flat at Tahoe. I was very happy, but that only netted me 38th place in 50-59 age group and outside of the coins. 40-49 is a larger AG, so there are more coins available. If I had to guess, I would say that you'd need to be in the top 20-24 of your age group to get a coin outright. Then they might go another 10-15 coins for racers who decline, but these are just guesses.
    6 hrs at Tahoe was good enough to put me in the Green corral... which was great for me. I still felt nearer the front at the LT start. The only time I felt stuck in traffic was on St. Kevins and to DITD's point... it probably helped in the long run to have been kept from over-doing the pace early in the race. I had a good day and ended with a 9:58 at LT. I was very happy with that. I would love to get under 9:00 this year, but that's probably a long shot!

    One last bit of advice, take every opportunity to chat-up Ken and Merilee (Dave Wiens too). They are generally around and very accessible at all races. They are super nice and interesting people. They really want you to get to Leadville... sometimes they can bend the odds in your favor, just a little, if you don't otherwise gain entry. It can't hurt!
    TTUB - Ventura County California

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    Thanks for the insight...(un)fortunately(?) we are both 30-39!

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    If you are thinking about LT 2018... enter the lottery as a 'Team' next fall, just you and your wife. 'Team' just means that you are entering with traveling partners and if one gets in, you all need to get in... in other words, you are signaling the LT staff that you and your wife can only attend if both of you gain entry. It does not mean that you have to race together. You still race as individuals.
    The lottery isn't a completely blind lottery... they seem to favor women entries. If you are teamed up with a woman, your odds are better. I've entered the lottery twice with my wife and gained entry both times.
    TTUB - Ventura County California

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by chancef1 View Post
    I'm in from the Barn Burner lotto with 8:25. Shooting for sub 9. Im stoked about this one, should be a good one.
    FYI, after 4 years at both the Barnburner and LT100 it seems to me that my LT100 time is predictably BB + 90 minutes. in 2013, 7:25 at BB lead to a 9 at LT100. YMMV of course... LT100 is much harder than BB; the altitude is a killer and there's considerably more climbing. Good luck!

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    Sdcadbiker, thanks for the insight. I haven't found anything to quantify the times like that. Sounds good to me. A couple months if even that before the BB I got the idea in my head that I wanted to race Leadville. I didnt have much training going into the BB maybe 400-500 miles. Over the last 7 months or so I started training and put on around 2500 miles at around 6300-8000' in elevation. Im more or less training to have a really good likelihood to do sub 9. If not its still going to be a race I will think about for the remainder of my life and should be one heck of a day.
    Last edited by chancef1; 02-15-2017 at 08:37 PM. Reason: error

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    did it a few years back and still think about it almost daily - mostly good memories. My advice take it all in and enjoy the day and don't let a sub 9 goal turn into a DNF - the smaller buckle is nice as well.

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    I raced the LT100 in 2016 and am about 90% certain of landing a charity spot for 2017.

    Leadville was such a great experience from the town to all the people involved in the weekend. What a vibe!

    Last year I had a major mechanical while outbound on St. Kevins and still feel very fortunate to have finished in under 12hours. I had 3 blown spokes on my rear wheel and had to baby it for over 80 miles. I finished in 11:46 and had to really fight for that. I hope to improve on that quite a bit this year.

    Good luck to all those who got in and you will look back fondly at the experience regardless of your buckle size.
    Team Kinetic Cycles/Fat Bikes Rule!

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbne1 View Post
    Good luck to all those who got in and you will look back fondly at the experience regardless of your buckle size.
    Well said! Regarding mechanical issues, there is no point in being a weight weenie at LT100 unless you're expecting a podium finish; the race is tough on equipment, particularly wheels and tires so imho beefier is better.

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    Agree on the equipment especially tires - find something to run that you can trust. If you don't do many group road rides you might want start to get used to drafting and working together in a pace line as there are some opportunities to really conserve energy and make up time this way - unless your on a SS..

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    Watched 'Race Across the Sky 1' last night.

    This is how I got into this mess in the first place... my wife and I watched it and immediately turned to each other and said 'We gotta do that!'
    TTUB - Ventura County California

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    Ha. Literally the same thing with my wife.

    I realize people likely do the ride on all sorts of bikes; is riding on a Norco Optic 29er and Rocky Element 990 BC Edition crazy? Neither of us would be going for the win but race road and XC, getting into mtb this year and would certainly have time goals we would be shooting for.

    Along that line of thinking, of the western qualifiers, are some. Ore technical than others by a marked degree?

    Finally, we will probably do Tahoe but have an inkling to either do the Silver 50 or Leadville stage race. Thoughts?

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    I did it on a SS coming from flat Indiana it comes down to your training mentally and physically. You see every type of bike imaginable and each has advantages on certain sections of the course. The Leadville stage race looks like a great way to experience the course.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HEWSINATOR View Post
    Ha. Literally the same thing with my wife.

    I realize people likely do the ride on all sorts of bikes; is riding on a Norco Optic 29er and Rocky Element 990 BC Edition crazy? Neither of us would be going for the win but race road and XC, getting into mtb this year and would certainly have time goals we would be shooting for.

    Along that line of thinking, of the western qualifiers, are some. Ore technical than others by a marked degree?

    Finally, we will probably do Tahoe but have an inkling to either do the Silver 50 or Leadville stage race. Thoughts?
    Those bikes look awesome for Leadville. I think you could race Leadville on almost anything. I choose a hardtail for the efficiency... but most people opt for FS for the all-day comfort. Those bikes look perfect to me.

    If you are worried about technical, I would avoid the Colorado qualifiers. Silver 50 is pretty rough from what I hear. In fact, a friend went out to CO last year and did the Silver 50... all the CO natives thought he was nuts to have driven all the way out to CO to race THAT particular race. It's rough.

    Tahoe is a good one. Not too technical. Long fire-road climb up the front side of the mountain, mixed up, down and single-track through the back-country, then some high-speed dowhilling back to the Start-Finish. Some of the downhill is on downhilling trails... so there are a few berms, lot's of switchbacks, etc... it's technical because it's 'at speed', not because of rock gardens or obstacles.
    TTUB - Ventura County California

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by HEWSINATOR View Post
    Ha. Literally the same thing with my wife.

    I realize people likely do the ride on all sorts of bikes; is riding on a Norco Optic 29er and Rocky Element 990 BC Edition crazy? Neither of us would be going for the win but race road and XC, getting into mtb this year and would certainly have time goals we would be shooting for.

    Along that line of thinking, of the western qualifiers, are some. Ore technical than others by a marked degree?

    Finally, we will probably do Tahoe but have an inkling to either do the Silver 50 or Leadville stage race. Thoughts?
    IMHO the best qualifier is the Flagstaff Barnburner; it's almost completely non-technical except for one short section that can bite you. Also, for a MTB race, there's not much climbing, the climbs are miles long but not steep. It's relatively easy to get a "red corral" qualifier time; this makes your first hour at LT100 a whole lot less frustrating than it otherwise might be.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sdcadbiker View Post
    IMHO the best qualifier is the Flagstaff Barnburner; it's almost completely non-technical except for one short section that can bite you. Also, for a MTB race, there's not much climbing, the climbs are miles long but not steep. It's relatively easy to get a "red corral" qualifier time; this makes your first hour at LT100 a whole lot less frustrating than it otherwise might be.
    If you are concerned about corral, then yes, Barn Burner is going to be the best option, and I can corroborate that it is a pretty "easy" course especially when compared to Tahoe.

    IMHO the Tahoe course is more fun and rewarding though, and I plan on doing it even after I've done Leadville.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by TTUB View Post
    Those bikes look awesome for Leadville. I think you could race Leadville on almost anything. I choose a hardtail for the efficiency... but most people opt for FS for the all-day comfort. Those bikes look perfect to me.

    If you are worried about technical, I would avoid the Colorado qualifiers. Silver 50 is pretty rough from what I hear. In fact, a friend went out to CO last year and did the Silver 50... all the CO natives thought he was nuts to have driven all the way out to CO to race THAT particular race. It's rough.

    Tahoe is a good one. Not too technical. Long fire-road climb up the front side of the mountain, mixed up, down and single-track through the back-country, then some high-speed dowhilling back to the Start-Finish. Some of the downhill is on downhilling trails... so there are a few berms, lot's of switchbacks, etc... it's technical because it's 'at speed', not because of rock gardens or obstacles.
    The Silver Rush course is definitely rougher and more technical than the LT100 course.

    Steeper rougher descents, more trips up to 12K, and more hike-a-bike for us mere mortals at least. I raced both races on a carbon HT last year but will be on a FS this year for the SR50 at least, for sure... I finished the SR50 in 5:09 just a bit inside of the top 30 in class (M30-39) and got a qualifier coin last year. They probably gave out 5 or 6 more behind me before cutting off for the lottery, but had also skipped over an equal number of people ahead who were not there to claim the coin or already had an entry.

    I ended up starting in the green corral for LT100 which I think is about the furthest back one can be to have a realistic shot at going sub 9. I finished in 8:54 but definitely lost time due to traffic on the first climb up St. Kevin's, while I was never forced to a stop or off the bike on the steeper parts I certainly wasn't going at the pace I wanted to be going. And I'll also echo the previous comment about being comfortable drafting and knowing how to work a pace line... There are good opportunities in the middle of the course and then again at the end from the bottom of St. Kevin's back into town, to gain some time and conserve some energy for the finish by getting in a group.

    I entered the lottery with a group this year again, like last year but didn't get picked. So I'll be doing the SR50 again but am also planning on leaving the following weekend open for a last minute trip to Tahoe if something goes sideways at Silver Rush. This year I'm really shooting for a sub 5hr SR50 finish to move up to the red corral at the start to help get ahead of some of the congestion of the first 10 miles.

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    I have a quick question about Austin Rattler. I plan to be there this year. I ride a hard-tail. I didn't expect that to be an issue for Austin... but at the races yesterday, I was talking with a guy who had done Austin last year. He said that some of the course was on rather crude cat-tracked roads/trails... and not very smooth. He will be going FS for this year's race. Is this anything to be legitimately worried about? I am a die-hard HT rider and don't mind some rough stuff... but 60 miles of stutter bumps doesn't sound like fun.
    TTUB - Ventura County California

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    Quote Originally Posted by TTUB View Post
    I have a quick question about Austin Rattler. I plan to be there this year. I ride a hard-tail. I didn't expect that to be an issue for Austin... but at the races yesterday, I was talking with a guy who had done Austin last year. He said that some of the course was on rather crude cat-tracked roads/trails... and not very smooth. He will be going FS for this year's race. Is this anything to be legitimately worried about? I am a die-hard HT rider and don't mind some rough stuff... but 60 miles of stutter bumps doesn't sound like fun.
    I raced it last year, headed back this year. HT is probably fine. There isn't really any chunder and minimal roots IMO. Most anything rough is short lived. I always ride FS however.

  26. #26
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    I got in via the lottery for 2017 and will be on a Stumpjumper Comp29. I am also a diehard HT guy, and strongly considering adding carbon bars and seat post to increase my comfort. Really looking forward to this!!
    I was too drunk and too much in pain to ride. Good times. - TacoBeer

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    Quote Originally Posted by TTUB View Post
    I have a quick question about Austin Rattler. I plan to be there this year. I ride a hard-tail. I didn't expect that to be an issue for Austin... but at the races yesterday, I was talking with a guy who had done Austin last year. He said that some of the course was on rather crude cat-tracked roads/trails... and not very smooth. He will be going FS for this year's race. Is this anything to be legitimately worried about? I am a die-hard HT rider and don't mind some rough stuff... but 60 miles of stutter bumps doesn't sound like fun.
    I raced it 3 years on a HT and last year had me wishing for a FS. The 'single track' that connects various fire roads and real single track are cut through fields and the chatter is supper irritating. You'll be fine on a HT though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HEWSINATOR View Post
    Ha. Literally the same thing with my wife.

    I realize people likely do the ride on all sorts of bikes; is riding on a Norco Optic 29er and Rocky Element 990 BC Edition crazy? Neither of us would be going for the win but race road and XC, getting into mtb this year and would certainly have time goals we would be shooting for.

    Along that line of thinking, of the western qualifiers, are some. Ore technical than others by a marked degree?

    Finally, we will probably do Tahoe but have an inkling to either do the Silver 50 or Leadville stage race. Thoughts?
    I rode the Leadville Silver Rush last year. We stuck around a few hours after the race ended for the awards ceremony. After the LT 100 qualifier coins had been given out to the people who earned them based on finishing time, they gave out about another 50+ coins by drawing race numbers out of a hat – and I was lucky enough to get one, so I'll be riding in the 2017 LT 100. I don’t know if they give out this many additional coins at all qualifiers, or if they favor the Silver Rush because it is in Leadville. But might be a reason to do the Silver Rush.

    In terms of how technical the course was, this was the first big mountain bike race I had ever ridden in, had not pre-ridden the course, and still thought it was fine. There are sections you have to walk up – not really because they are technical, more that they are steep and at 12000 feet! I wrote a report on my experience with the race here: https://thebottlecage.wordpress.com/...rst-blog-post/ - this is from the perspective of a newbie bike racer, so pls cut me some slack if I wrote any obvious stuff that more experienced bike racers already know!

    Separately, anyone know how to translate a 6hr finishing time in the Silver Rush to a estimated finishing time in the LT 100?

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigWheels7 View Post
    Separately, anyone know how to translate a 6hr finishing time in the Silver Rush to a estimated finishing time in the LT 100?
    From my experience and using the Leadville Corral chart...I'd say about a 10 hour LT100.
    TTUB - Ventura County California

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    Quote Originally Posted by TTUB View Post
    From my experience and using the Leadville Corral chart...I'd say about a 10 hour LT100.
    Thx TTUB. That'll be a nice round target (aspiration?) for me to aim for!

    In an earlier post you mentioned you did last years race in a little under 10 - how much walking did you end up doing on Columbine and Powerline?

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigWheels7 View Post
    how much walking did you end up doing on Columbine and Powerline?
    Columbine isn't that bad... it's actually a well graded climb, except for two things...
    A) It's really long (7.4 miles). You just need to settle into a good climbing rhythm. The surface is very good.
    B) The top 1.5 miles get steep and rocky. That's the part where people walk. Even if you could ride some of it, it becomes a single file line of hikers. The road becomes a narrow two-track. By this point in the race, faster racers are buzzing by on their downhill run only inches away. You must be very careful if you choose to step out of line to pass someone. I probably walked 1 mile of it. After the steep section, you crest over and get a brief downhill to the turn-around.

    Powerline of the way back is the true crux of the race. It's long (3.8 miles) and steep. I walked off and on during the steepest portions. Not sure exactly how much, lot's of on and off the bike. Lot's of false summits as you get near the top.

    I'm a wimp when it gets steep, so you'll probably be just fine!

    Also, beware "The Boulevard" into town. I had heard that it was a little kicker, but was shocked when I laid eyes on it for the first time. I was trying to get to the finish before 10:00 and was a bit deflated when I saw it. It's a boulder field. Barely rideable. I walked a little of it (100 yards??) ... my wife rode it without dabbing, so it can be done.
    Just be mentally prepared for it.
    TTUB - Ventura County California

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    Heres my pro tip. Run a 2x 36/22 or 38/24 or 39/26. Joe Dombrowski broke it down in one of the websites.

    Or eagle with a 38.

    My gf ran a 34 xx1 on her sworks stumpy hardtail. Going to a 9-44 casette this time.

    Id say a 36/22 2x10/1 with the 9-44 be perfect. Most bikes cant take 2x anymore though.
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaneDetroitCity View Post
    Or eagle with a 38.
    I'm on a 34T Eagle and it works great at sea level but was considering a 32T to compensate for altitude but am worried I might get spun out.

    I don't think I could turn a 38T all day.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LaneDetroitCity View Post
    Heres my pro tip. Run a 2x 36/22 or 38/24 or 39/26. Joe Dombrowski broke it down in one of the websites.
    My gf ran a 34 xx1 on her sworks stumpy hardtail. Going to a 9-44 casette this time.
    My wife and I ran into Joe D. on the street in Leadville last year. We asked for a quick photo and expected him to move on... but he didn't. He stood there and talked with us for a long time. He couldn't have been a nicer guy.
    TTUB - Ventura County California

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    Quote Originally Posted by HyperSprite View Post
    I'm on a 34T Eagle and it works great at sea level but was considering a 32T to compensate for altitude but am worried I might get spun out.

    I don't think I could turn a 38T all day.
    I was basically speaking from a pro tip level then everybody can adjust back from there. Todd Wells and Jeremiah went 38/eagle, Joe Dombrowski went 39/26 x11. Two different ways to get the same result.

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    Starting strategy question- I received my corral assignment, and will be in the White (last) corral as I am a lottery entrant. My question to you Leadville veterans:

    Do I accept the fact that I will be in the bottleneck on the first climb and just have a mellow start, OR, do I try to hammer for the first few miles and move up?
    I was too drunk and too much in pain to ride. Good times. - TacoBeer

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    Quote Originally Posted by tjkm View Post
    Starting strategy question- I received my corral assignment, and will be in the White (last) corral as I am a lottery entrant. My question to you Leadville veterans:

    Do I accept the fact that I will be in the bottleneck on the first climb and just have a mellow start, OR, do I try to hammer for the first few miles and move up?
    In 2015 I was in the White corral as well. I was at the front of it, and when they took down the tape and squished everyone together I actually ended up near the front of the blue corral once it was all said and done!

    I didn't go out full bore by any means, but I did try to pick off as many people as I could. A lot of people take pavement really slow and don't really act like they can ride in a pack, so I tried to ride through and get away from that situation. I did get in a bottleneck on St Kevins, but if you have any mountain biking skills at all it's easy to take some lesser ridden lines and pass people. I never had to come off the bike/walk on St Kevins, I think I only dabbed a foot once. I ended up passing A LOT of people on St Kevins and Sugarloaf climbs by not filing into the smoother lines (I rode full suspension, an Epic) which helped me get through a lot of traffic. Never once did I feel like I was maxed out. I waited for Columbine for that to happen, ha!

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    Quote Originally Posted by sooshee View Post
    In 2015 I was in the White corral as well. I was at the front of it, and when they took down the tape and squished everyone together I actually ended up near the front of the blue corral once it was all said and done!

    I didn't go out full bore by any means, but I did try to pick off as many people as I could. A lot of people take pavement really slow and don't really act like they can ride in a pack, so I tried to ride through and get away from that situation. I did get in a bottleneck on St Kevins, but if you have any mountain biking skills at all it's easy to take some lesser ridden lines and pass people. I never had to come off the bike/walk on St Kevins, I think I only dabbed a foot once. I ended up passing A LOT of people on St Kevins and Sugarloaf climbs by not filing into the smoother lines (I rode full suspension, an Epic) which helped me get through a lot of traffic. Never once did I feel like I was maxed out. I waited for Columbine for that to happen, ha!
    Thanks sooshee, that helps for sure. I am fine riding in a pack (just worry about those around me who are not) and like you advice for the lesser ridden lines. I will be on a Stumpjumper hard tail and have decent bike handling skills, so I will keep that in mind.

    Another question for the veterans - I currently run a 1 x 11 set up (32t chain ring & 11-42t on the back). Should I consider a 30t or 28t for the climbs? I know I will be spun on on any flats and downhill sections I can pedal. I get spun on on my 32t on some training rides now.

    Will I gain anything by switching, or keep with a 32t?
    I was too drunk and too much in pain to ride. Good times. - TacoBeer

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    I agree with sooshee, you'll have chances to move on up if you are alert without redlining yourself.

    The ride out of town and just about to the base of St Kevins is downhill. If you are savvy at pack riding, you will be able to move up by riding fast and moving through the pack... ride hard, but you will not need to redline.

    St Kevins is going to be a bottleneck, there's just no way around that fact. Just sit back, relax and 'keep your powder dry' for the remainder of the day. I started at the front of the green corral, moved up on the way to St Kevins and was still unable to ride my own pace up St Kevins. You will have plenty of time to ride as fast as you want for the rest of the day, so don't let it get you down.

    As for gearing, I do not ride 1x... so take my opinion with a grain of salt... You do not want to get spun out too easily. There's a LOT of flat work between the bottom of Powerline and Twin Lakes. You'll want to get in a paceline if you can, it can be fast. You will easily be riding at speeds between 16 and 23 mph in this section going outbound.

    As for gearing for climbing, the climbing is not that steep with the significant exception of Powerline on the way back... that IS long AND steep.

    Checkout the various Leadville course segments on Strava to compare the steepness and length of climbs with what you ride and train on at home.
    TTUB - Ventura County California

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by tjkm View Post
    Thanks sooshee, that helps for sure. I am fine riding in a pack (just worry about those around me who are not) and like you advice for the lesser ridden lines. I will be on a Stumpjumper hard tail and have decent bike handling skills, so I will keep that in mind.

    Another question for the veterans - I currently run a 1 x 11 set up (32t chain ring & 11-42t on the back). Should I consider a 30t or 28t for the climbs? I know I will be spun on on any flats and downhill sections I can pedal. I get spun on on my 32t on some training rides now.

    Will I gain anything by switching, or keep with a 32t?
    If you are used to doing steep climbs with that ratio then stick with it; personally I prefer a 1.5:1 granny gear (24/36 on a 2X).

    A good point was made about getting to the start line early so you can be at the front of your corral, that makes moving up easier in the first few paved miles. However, everyone hates it when people force their way through the crowd on St Kev's so please don't be that guy. If you can make it to the Turquiose Lake paved downhill in under an hour then you're in pretty good shape; 50 minutes would be better still but don't sweat it; it's a long day and the Sugarloaf climb is wide open if you need to move up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tjkm View Post
    Thanks sooshee, that helps for sure. I am fine riding in a pack (just worry about those around me who are not) and like you advice for the lesser ridden lines. I will be on a Stumpjumper hard tail and have decent bike handling skills, so I will keep that in mind.

    Another question for the veterans - I currently run a 1 x 11 set up (32t chain ring & 11-42t on the back). Should I consider a 30t or 28t for the climbs? I know I will be spun on on any flats and downhill sections I can pedal. I get spun on on my 32t on some training rides now.

    Will I gain anything by switching, or keep with a 32t?
    The following website is pretty helpful: Bicycle Gear Calculator

    With your 1x11, on the high end in the 11 tooth cog at 90 RPM, you'll be riding at ~22.5mph. And on the low end in the 42 tooth cog at 75 RPM, you'll be riding at ~5mph.

    I rode Silver Rush last year, and found that I needed my 24/36 gear on my 2X for the steep, high elevation hills. That had me riding a little over 4mph at 75 RPM. Much slower than that and I was walking anyway. I have a 1x12 this year for LT100, with a similar low end - and plan on needing it. For reference, I did SR50 in 6 hrs, and plan on about 10 hrs for LT100, so a pretty average rider.

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    I'll probably be running a TRS Race 9-46 with a 32t

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    All this Leadville talk has me excited for this, my second year. I'm older so take this for what it is....I ran a Rotor Crank 36/25 into an 11/42 cassette on my carbon Epic and will not make any changes this year.

    I started in the Purple corral last year and what has been previously stated is true. Move through the pack on the initial downhill sections then get through the St Kevins conga line then the race opens up. ST K was not bad last year and I did take a couple of non-conformist lines to get around the conga line.

    The hardest part of the race for me was Powerline inbound as it is steep, later in the race and has a few false summits. Just settle in and you'll get to the top.

    Can't wait for race day.

    Cheers everyone.....

    PS: For those new to the race what really helped me before last year's race was watching the entire video collection that breaks down all the segments. You gain so much valuable information watching those videos over time. They allow you to review the trail surfaces, others bike set up, clothing selections, the initial pack riding, climbs, etc. Trail surfaces of course change but you'll at least understand most of it.....
    Team Kinetic Cycles/Fat Bikes Rule!

  44. #44
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    Awesome feedback, thanks everyone!

    I won't be 'that guy'

    Cheers!
    I was too drunk and too much in pain to ride. Good times. - TacoBeer

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    Checking in. Is everyone ready??

    I raced Austin for corral placement and it wasn't pretty! I'm heading up to Tahoe this weekend in hopes of better success. I really want to get into the Green Corral.

    Hope everyone is on-track, it will not be long now.
    TTUB - Ventura County California

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    Quote Originally Posted by TTUB View Post
    Checking in. Is everyone ready??

    I raced Austin for corral placement and it wasn't pretty! I'm heading up to Tahoe this weekend in hopes of better success. I really want to get into the Green Corral.

    Hope everyone is on-track, it will not be long now.
    Feeling good and totally pumped! I've done a 50 mile race at altitude and figured out what NOT to do with my nutrition. I have done a good mix of intensity, long rides and climbing fests, with two more weeks before a 'no bike' family vacation. I'll have about a week back on the bike after vacation before making the trek to Leadville.

    Good luck in Tahoe TTUB!
    I was too drunk and too much in pain to ride. Good times. - TacoBeer

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by TTUB View Post
    Checking in. Is everyone ready??

    I raced Austin for corral placement and it wasn't pretty! I'm heading up to Tahoe this weekend in hopes of better success. I really want to get into the Green Corral.

    Hope everyone is on-track, it will not be long now.
    Austin seemed slow this year.
    I've done Austin and Whiteface past two years. Didn't coral up at Austin, but did get a bump to silver at Whiteface. Looking forward to it....

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by TTUB View Post
    Checking in. Is everyone ready??

    I raced Austin for corral placement and it wasn't pretty! I'm heading up to Tahoe this weekend in hopes of better success. I really want to get into the Green Corral.

    Hope everyone is on-track, it will not be long now.
    I rode in the Silver Rush this past weekend and did well enough to bump up one corral position to green, from purple. While it's nice to start further up, I don't think it'll impact my race too much, as I plan to ride the first half pretty conservatively, and imagine I'll be riding much of the first half of the race with riders from the purple corral, or maybe even further back.

    In the SR this past weekend, my relative performance in the second half was better than the first - as I think a lot of people go out too hard to begin with and then slow down. I expect this will be even more true in the LT100. For this reason, I'm not too worried about my starting position and first few hours of the race. Hours 6-10 are what I'm more concerned with!

    TTUB - good luck in Tahoe - I hope the race goes well for you.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigWheels7 View Post
    I'm not too worried about my starting position and first few hours of the race. Hours 6-10 are what I'm more concerned with!
    Are you planning to finish in 10 hours? If so then you need to modify your plan a little; you still need to pace yourself carefully but you really need to be at Carter Summit (top of St Kev's) in an hour, Pipeline in 2:15, the dam in 3, Columbine summit in 5. Don't underestimate Columbine, it can suck the life out of even experienced Leadville racers so it's best to allow 2 hours for the climb and be pleasantly surprised if it takes less than that.
    Anyway, if you are chasing a 10-hours finish you might want to burn a match or two in the first hour; don't waste your corral position by sliding backwards on the pavement or the first climb. Just my .02.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigWheels7 View Post
    I rode in the Silver Rush this past weekend and did well enough to bump up one corral position to green, from purple. While it's nice to start further up, I don't think it'll impact my race too much, as I plan to ride the first half pretty conservatively, and imagine I'll be riding much of the first half of the race with riders from the purple corral, or maybe even further back.

    In the SR this past weekend, my relative performance in the second half was better than the first - as I think a lot of people go out too hard to begin with and then slow down. I expect this will be even more true in the LT100. For this reason, I'm not too worried about my starting position and first few hours of the race. Hours 6-10 are what I'm more concerned with!

    TTUB - good luck in Tahoe - I hope the race goes well for you.
    I was at SR50 and will be in green coral up from the lottery back of pack


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  51. #51
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    I'll be racing this year for the first time. Starting from Blue and part of a group. Does anyone have some decent milestone times for both 9 hour and 12 hour finishes? Trying to figure out key locations and times I can use to ensure I make it!

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by sperky View Post
    I'll be racing this year for the first time. Starting from Blue and part of a group. Does anyone have some decent milestone times for both 9 hour and 12 hour finishes? Trying to figure out key locations and times I can use to ensure I make it!
    12 Hours:
    Carter Summit: 1 hour 10 mins
    Pipeline: 2 hours 30 mins
    Dam: 3 hours 30 mins
    Columbine: 6 hours 30 mins
    Dam: 8 hours
    Top of Powerline: 9 hours 30 mins
    Carter Summit: 10 hours 30 mins
    Finish: 11 hours 30 mins

    9 Hours:
    Carter Summit: 50 mins
    Pipeline: 2 hours 10 mins
    Dam: 3 hours
    Columbine: 4 hours 45 mins
    Dam: 5 hours 30 mins
    Pipeline: 6 hours 15 mins
    Carter Summit: 8 hours 10 mins
    Finish: 9 hours

    Good luck!

  53. #53
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    sdcadbiker,

    Good advice above, clearly from a position of experience. But I think something is off with your 12h cutoff times above*.

    If by "Dam" you mean the Twin Lakes Return/60 mile mark, the cutoff time is 7:45, so your 8 hrs would put them out of the race (and they may be OK with that!). Also, 6:30 at the top of Columbine requires a good deal of reverse-splitting, combined with just generally good luck, but seems doable. I would shoot for 5:45 or 6 on top of Columbine for a 12 hr finish.

    Sperky,

    I would offer the following modifications for a 12 hr finish (11:30+buffer):

    12 Hours:
    Carter Summit: 1 hour 10 mins
    Pipeline 1: 2 hours 30 mins
    Twin Lakes 1: 3 hours 30 mins
    Columbine: 5 hours 45 mins
    Twin Lakes 2: 6 hours 30 mins
    Pipeline 2: 7 hours 45 mins
    Finish: 11 hours 30 mins

    My wife and I put these together prior to the 2013 running by downloading a bunch of results from 2012 and getting rid of outliers, etc. Darned if I didn't come in @ 11:28. Note that my landmarks differ from sdcadbiker's for the second half as mine focus on cutoff points. His landmarks are much better if you know you're going to make it!

    Good luck!
    Paul


    * also from a position of experience -> from the back of the pack/surfing those cutoff times!

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by JPaul View Post
    sdcadbiker,

    Good advice above, clearly from a position of experience. But I think something is off with your 12h cutoff times above*.
    You may be right; I took the 12 hours numbers from my 2008 race (11:27 finish) and they may be off by a few minutes. At Leadville I always do the second half much faster, as should everyone who is pacing appropriately because the climbing is very front-loaded. The nine hours numbers are from 2013 and are quite accurate. Note that the Twin Lakes cutoff time is not strictly enforced, at least it wasn't in the Ken era; he would not start pulling guys out until 8:15. Not sure about the Lifetime Fitness rules, they seem to be more strict about everything.

  55. #55
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    I researched and stressed about every detail getting ready for Leadville and did all of the calculations on target times and cut offs. I taped them to top tube of my bike for quick reference and on race day I didn't look at them once. I just rode. I got the small buckle and it was fairly stress free.

  56. #56
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    Its making me nervous thinking about the race. I'm coming in confident of a sub 9 hour finish. Just need to do what Ive been training for and have a good fun day on the bike. This is my first real year of racing and its been a some of the best experiences Ive had between GJ offroad, and Growler. Looking forward to the Breck 68 too... and wrapping up with a strong finish in Leadville.

    May go back to the Barnburner and see how much better a time can be had after a year on training.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by chancef1 View Post
    This is my first real year of racing and its been a some of the best experiences Ive had between GJ offroad, and Growler. Looking forward to the Breck 68 too... and wrapping up with a strong finish in Leadville.
    Don't underestimate the Breck 68. I haven't done leadville before but I can tell you the 68 is tough. Come prepared for nasty wet cold weather on the second loop. if you can handle Breck then leadville shouldn't be a problem.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by sdcadbiker View Post
    Are you planning to finish in 10 hours? If so then you need to modify your plan a little; you still need to pace yourself carefully but you really need to be at Carter Summit (top of St Kev's) in an hour, Pipeline in 2:15, the dam in 3, Columbine summit in 5. Don't underestimate Columbine, it can suck the life out of even experienced Leadville racers so it's best to allow 2 hours for the climb and be pleasantly surprised if it takes less than that.
    Anyway, if you are chasing a 10-hours finish you might want to burn a match or two in the first hour; don't waste your corral position by sliding backwards on the pavement or the first climb. Just my .02.
    Thx sdcadbiker. Good advice on pacing. sounds like pushing it a little for the first hour makes sense to maintain good positioning. Are there good sections outbound to ride more conservatively and save some energy for later in the race?

  59. #59
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    Lot's of good advice here. Thanks all.

    It's sounds like all of you are well on track to success at Leadville.

    Tahoe didn't go very well! Pretty hot, very dry and dusty. I was drinking on my usual schedule, but should have compensated for the hot/dry conditions sooner. I ramped up the hydration as the temps rose, but it was too little too late. I had to go pretty slow the last 20 due to cramping. At any rate, I am in Purple and that is just fine. I was never going for a sub 9 finish anyway.
    TTUB - Ventura County California

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigWheels7 View Post
    TAre there good sections outbound to ride more conservatively and save some energy for later in the race?
    Yes, from the bottom of Powerline outbound to the Twin Lakes dam you can keep it tempo. Try to find a group for the long paved section from Powerline to Pipeline, it can really help to save energy if you can share the load with others. Also, after Pipeline there will likely be people passing you; keep an eye on your HR, jump on a passing train if you have the energy but have the discipline to let them go if the pace is too high, you don't want to burn out before Columbine.

    Inbound it's much the same; after Twin Lakes keep it tempo until the bottom of Powerline. After that it's all down to what you have left in the tank.

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigWheels7 View Post
    I rode in the Silver Rush this past weekend and did well enough to bump up one corral position to green, from purple.
    Since you rode SR the last 2 years, what did you think of the course changes this year? I'd guess the new course is faster than the old one due to the elimination of that steep hike a bike going back up to the snow drift, but not sure by how much.

    I rode SR this year for the first time. Took it pretty easy in general because I knew I had a 0% chance of a roll down slot, just wanted to learn from the experience and stick around for the lottery. Ended up getting a coin no problem in the lottery but deferred to next year to actually train this time. Still, curious about SR finish times vs projected L100 finishes in general for next year's planning. I'm going to do SR again and am pretty sure I'll get into green corral, would love to shoot for sub-9 but would have a ton of work cut out for me to make that happen.

  62. #62
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    2017 SR50 course much more difficult than in years past. Winning and top times were between 4-4.5 hours. Many people taking 5 to 6+ hours to complete the out-n-back. IMO, the SR50 course much more demanding than the LT100 course. The LT100 course is pretty manicured now days, where the SR50 course is pretty rugged and bony....similar to the LT100 from many years ago.

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    All in, I think the SR course was pretty similar to last year. They took out the steep hike-a-bike on the way back to ball mountain saddle, but made the course almost 1.5 miles longer as a result, with a few hundred more feet of climbing also. Other than that steep hike-a-bike section that they took out, I walked a similar amount this year vs. last year.

  64. #64
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    Are thunder burt snakeskin a good idea or too flimsy? Helping my gf sort tires. She ran sworks tires last time they dont make those anymore. Was thinking thunderburt snake f/r, or racing ralph snake front raceking protection rear.

    Sent from my SM-G360P using Tapatalk

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    This past weekend I had the chance to preride some sections of the LT100 course. Here are a few observations from a first timer:
    - St. Kevins climb was steeper than I was expecting. Like sdcadbiker said above, will need to burn a match or two here
    - In one section of the powerline descent, the preferred line changes from the left to right side of the trail. I saw this well in advance, but due to the steep, loose over hard surface, still almost didn't make the transition, and came close to wiping out. will remember this for race day.
    - The singletrack section outbound might be my favorite part of the course!
    - I walked less than I was expecting on columbine. There are parts where I had to walk because it was too steep to ride, and there were parts I could have either ridden or walked at 3mph. In the race, I'll probably err towards walking these sections. The first walking section is just as the treeline ends.
    - The upper part of the columbine descent has some tight turns - will need to be careful with 2-way traffic. Can open up on the lower part and hit the 30s
    - On the powerline climb, ditto with columbine - walked less than expecting; some sections you have to walk, and some sections you could either walk or ride
    - The boulevard is an unexpected climb at the end. will need to be mentally prepared for this
    - There are a lot of long sections of either paved road, or smooth forest road. I'm going to ride a continental race king tire on my rear, instead of my usual bontrager xr3
    - I've concluded it'll be a challenge for me to go sub 10 hrs - even though my SR finish time and corral placement would suggest I should be able to.
    - I rode the course over 2 days, and each day was tiring. will be tough putting all that together in one day - looking forward to it!

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by KERKOVEJ View Post
    2017 SR50 course much more difficult than in years past. Winning and top times were between 4-4.5 hours. Many people taking 5 to 6+ hours to complete the out-n-back. IMO, the SR50 course much more demanding than the LT100 course. The LT100 course is pretty manicured now days, where the SR50 course is pretty rugged and bony....similar to the LT100 from many years ago.
    Congrats on your 4th at SR! I noticed the 1 second time difference between 4th and 3rd... did it come down to a sprint?
    TTUB - Ventura County California

  67. #67
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    Just a few comments... and don't take me too seriously!

    BigWheels7:
    - St. Kevins climb was steeper than I was expecting. Like sdcadbiker said above, will need to burn a match or two here
    I don't see how you could burn a match here if you tried. Unless you are in the first two corrals, there will be too much congestion on the climb. It's a long day, keep your matches dry. There will be plenty of opportinitues to burn them later in the day.
    - In one section of the powerline descent, the preferred line changes from the left to right side of the trail. I saw this well in advance, but due to the steep, loose over hard surface, still almost didn't make the transition, and came close to wiping out. will remember this for race day.
    It's kinda steep so you have to control your speed or you will not be able to make the many line corrections needed, especially true lower on the descent.
    - I walked less than I was expecting on columbine. There are parts where I had to walk because it was too steep to ride, and there were parts I could have either ridden or walked at 3mph. In the race, I'll probably err towards walking these sections. The first walking section is just as the treeline ends.
    You are unlikely to have the option to ride the steeper sections above treeline on race day, unless you are up front, you will likely be forced into a single-file line of walkers. Step out of line and you will get mowed down by descending riders.
    - The upper part of the columbine descent has some tight turns - will need to be careful with 2-way traffic. Can open up on the lower part and hit the 30s
    Yes, lower Columbine can be fast, just mind the loose gravel in the switchback turns.
    - On the powerline climb, ditto with columbine - walked less than expecting; some sections you have to walk, and some sections you could either walk or ride
    In my mind, this is the crux of the whole race. You need to save some matches to burn on this climb coming home! It's a walk/ride affair... depending on how tired you are, your mileage may vary!.
    - The boulevard is an unexpected climb at the end. will need to be mentally prepared for this
    This! There's nothing more heartbreaking than to know you are almost home free, you've already calculated your likely finishing time, then you turn the corner and see 'Boulevard'. Yes, you need to steel yourself! It's actaully over fairly fast, just keep telling yourself that!
    TTUB - Ventura County California

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaneDetroitCity View Post
    Are thunder burt snakeskin a good idea or too flimsy? Helping my gf sort tires. She ran sworks tires last time they dont make those anymore. Was thinking thunderburt snake f/r, or racing ralph snake front raceking protection rear.

    Sent from my SM-G360P using Tapatalk
    In Colorado I've had good luck with RaRa 2.35 snakeskin in dry conditions, x-king 2.4 protection if it's wet. The Conti Black Chili compound seems to grip wet rocks & roots quite well and the x-king rolls well on pavement. Leadville doesn't have much tech so you don't need huge knobs but you do need a tough sidewall.

  69. #69
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    "- In one section of the powerline descent, the preferred line changes from the left to right side of the trail. I saw this well in advance, but due to the steep, loose over hard surface, still almost didn't make the transition, and came close to wiping out. will remember this for race day."

    Yep. That transition is where I blew a front tire in 2010, wiped out at ramming speed and broke my shoulder - DNF. Higher up on Powerline where it starts to get really fast there are some water bars that are in shade and can send you OTB if you're not paying attention. After that it gets really fun and if you're OK with DH you can pass slower descenders if you are prepared to ride offline into the ruts & rubble. However, unless you are chasing a big buckle it's likely not worth it. This is where tough tire sidewalls will get you down safely.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by sdcadbiker View Post
    "- In one section of the powerline descent, the preferred line changes from the left to right side of the trail. I saw this well in advance, but due to the steep, loose over hard surface, still almost didn't make the transition, and came close to wiping out. will remember this for race day."

    Yep. That transition is where I blew a front tire in 2010, wiped out at ramming speed and broke my shoulder - DNF. Higher up on Powerline where it starts to get really fast there are some water bars that are in shade and can send you OTB if you're not paying attention. After that it gets really fun and if you're OK with DH you can pass slower descenders if you are prepared to ride offline into the ruts & rubble. However, unless you are chasing a big buckle it's likely not worth it. This is where tough tire sidewalls will get you down safely.
    sorry to hear about your crash - can easily see how it happens on powerline if you get going too fast. Good point on the waterbars. I had my dropper down, and got some nice air off them. it helped that I saw them in advance - I had clear glasses which helps spot things in shade vs. sun.

  71. #71
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    @TTUB: Thanks! I caught 3rd place with like 1-mile left. Passing was difficult and the finish was a steep downhill into a left turn to the finish. There just wasn't enough course in front of 3rd place and myself to have a proper sprint-off It's all good. 3rd place rode a stronger race from start to finish, so he very much earned it.

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