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  1. #1
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    Leadville 100 or bust

    This year I am entered into the Leadville 100 bike race and have been psyching myself up for it since I sent in my entry form in January. It’ll be my first mountain bike race, (although I am no newbie to Mountain biking) and cutting my teeth on a 100 mile, high-altitude event may have been a stretch. I have read all the on-line accounts I could find, and have begun to put in the extra saddle time required. My mental and physical status swings like a great pendulum; some days I feel as if I could beat the course record tomorrow (in reality I’m not even close) and other times I am hoping to just finish in 13 hours.

    Since I seem to have exhausted my anecdotal resources and this is only March, how about sharing some of yours. Thoughts on previous 100s’ (LT100 or others) training plans, the course, tips, and even threats are welcomed.

  2. #2
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    Ride a lot

    I did it last year for the first time and DNF'd at mile 76 (10 hours flat). I did not train anywhere near enough. I registered again this year and got in.

    My training is going well this year and I am determined to make that DNF disappear with a strong finish. Ride a lot, especially climbing and practicing your nutrition. These were my 2 big weaknesses last year. I have put in 1500 base miles between the road, FS gearie and SS since Jan 1. I've already completed White Rim in a day (100 miles off road) and tomorrow will be my second road century of the year. All these miles have been relatively easy for the most part. I"m not starting hill repeats or intervals for another few weeks at least and even then I will ease into it. August is a long time away.

    The race is very fun though and you will have a great time. If you have more specific questions I'm glad to answer them the best I can and I'm sure others will join in as well.
    On-One Lurcher SS
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  3. #3
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    keep on keepin on

    Pivvay-
    It looks like you are on your way to a fast and solid ride at Leadville this year. That DNF last year was probably a better motivator than just completing the event. 1500 miles since 2005 is a lot better than I have done (almost 700, not counting rollers and misc bikes) so I guess I can step it up a little more. Maybe I have been reading too many books and such on training time and hours, trying not to overdo it to early. (I checked out your blog too, nice stuff)
    For years I've ridden about 3-4 times a week and not cared too much about pace, HR, etc. This 'training' stuff is all new to me, but I like it. I have been riding with a HRM, tracking saddle time, done an LT test and recorded other exercise info. Riding at a low endurance pace (below 85%LT) seems to be my biggest challenge. I am not sure how I will be able to keep my HR low at high altitude if I can't do it now.
    So many questions, but the answer, like you've said, is ride a lot.

  4. #4
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    Everyone is different. I'm 24 and have been riding at various levels for 8 years now. A few of my friends would be burned out with the training I've done since September and some of them could tolerate even more. I've got maybe 3200miles in since September, 30% or so on the mountain bike.

    There is definitely a lot to training "correctly" and part of mine is experience and I'm sure I could benefit from a coach still. I usually do 4 week cycles building 10% a week and taking a low hour/volume rest week every 4. Sometimes I push the 10% limit like I did the past week (20-22 hours depending on if you count commuting) and 300+miles including a ~115mile ride to Estes and back today from my house. I don't push the limit very much though until I have a good base to work off of and I try to listen to my body. If it says go to bed at 8pm and don't ride the trainer, I try to listen.

    I'm also pushing off speedwork/intervals a little longer as mention before but I am doing some more power work (big ring/seated climbing etc) in this phase. You don't want to be burned out by August for sure.

    Another thing I've worked on really hard this winter is nutrition. Specifically finding food that works for me and determining the correct intervals to eat. Ensure (the old people stuff) and Clif Nectar bars are really working well for me and today I used them all morning and hopped off the bike after 7.5 hours feeling really great and only using 1 gel all day.

    Anyway I'll try to keep the info coming. Feel free to ask more questions and hope some of it helps.
    On-One Lurcher SS
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  5. #5
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    lots of miles, but don't forget power, like I did...

    Quote Originally Posted by goldenboy
    ...Maybe I have been reading too many books and such on training time and hours, trying not to overdo it to early. (I checked out your blog too, nice stuff)
    For years I've ridden about 3-4 times a week and not cared too much about pace, HR, etc. This 'training' stuff is all new to me, but I like it. I have been riding with a HRM, tracking saddle time, done an LT test and recorded other exercise info. Riding at a low endurance pace (below 85%LT) seems to be my biggest challenge...
    I finished my first attempt at the LT100 last year in 11:15. My training was focused pretty much entirely on endurance. Back in the 90's when I was working on being faster for traditional XC racing, I did the whole HRM thing, had a VO2 max blood test, did intervals, drills, weight training, etc. And it was effective.

    In the last 4 years, I've become a long ride junkie. Last Spring and Summer I took that to extreme. I did many long days, practicing my food by living on it during many full days on the bike. So that was pretty much my training strategy, ride a whole lot. But no intervals, no HRM, no scheduling of workouts...

    I succeeded. Finishing was my only goal for last year, and I achieved it. But there was an hour or so, during the powerline climb and the pavement climb to St Kevins, when I would have gladly quit if it had been easy to do so (for example, if a van had pulled up and offered to take me to my truck). And I really would have liked to break 11 hours.

    I concluded that my training lacked enough punishment. This year I'll do 7-10 hour efforts again, but probably with some intervals injected into them. Get myself really really tired, then force myself to recover from an abusive effort. Because that's what powerline is like. And I'll have days where I just do intervals, and days where I just go easy.

    Check out my leadville story here (with GPS-driven elevation profile):

    http://www.arkansasvalley.net/tpurvis/LT100_2005.html

    I will haul out some of the old training techniques for this year. Need to get a new battery put into my HRM. But I'm behind schedule. I had a medium OK endurance base built up, then went out on Wednesday and horsed around on some snowy singletrack, slid out and fell onto a stump. Broke a rib. Dang. So I'll be back on a road bike in two or three weeks.

    On opportunity to develop grit, courage, and determination...
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldenboy
    Since I seem to have exhausted my anecdotal resources and this is only March, how about sharing some of yours. Thoughts on previous 100s’ (LT100 or others) training plans, the course, tips, and even threats are welcomed.
    In a lot of ways, my first of three rides at Leadville was the best (although the "worst" with respect to time). I went in to the ride with just over 500 miles of true training miles on a bike for the year, but that also might have been the fewest miles I'd had at that time of the year in the previous 20 years (meaning I have a lot of miles on my legs) and I'd run a marathon earlier that summer. I also was also going two to three days a week to the gym to lift weights. My point here is that (IMHO) it's not so much lots of miles that you need -- it's fitness and whole body strength. What got me up the powerline climb on the way back was not so much the miles on my legs but the strength in my arms and back. I'm not talking burly, body-builder strength (that would be a negative), but rather that wiry, take the pounding all-day type of strength...

    I also recommend you set your own pace up the climbs -- and make no mistake, this race is all about the climbs. Have the mental strength to believe you know what's best for you -- don't hang on to someone going too fast, don't sit-in to conserve energy that might be best spent at that point. Passing is easy on this course and you have no excuse for not keeping the tempo you want. That being said, there's a lot of sections where you can draft and there's a huge advantage for people with road racing experience and can comfortably settle in and suck a wheel. My second year at Leadville, I found myself riding alone for the last 60 miles -- and it wasn't because I was off the front. If I had been, it wouldn't have been so painful...

    I have found it to be important for me to ride the race using the neutral support. My wife and kids were there each year, but there was no way I was gonna make them spend the day looking after me -- they had already sacraficed enough on my behalf. Also, knowing that I had to depend on myself made sure I didn't let myself mentally weaken, knowing I wasn't going to be getting any pep talks at aid stations from loved ones -- it was up to me. This is one point that I clearly diverge from the standard -- most folks seem to want friends and family around for support.

    Finally, this is where I'm way out of the norm -- I "bonk" train on a regular basis and probably eat less during the race than 99% of the folks out there (including the spectators). Having skipped breakfast (well, there's always a cappacino), I'll do 40 mile training rides in the middle of the day on two bottles of water, followed by a lunch of fruit. It is totally off the wall, but I've been around awhile and found it works for me. During the race, I don't take my first food until two hours in and I probably down about 10 cliff shots, three large bottles of whatever sports drink they serve, and 5 large bottles of water. There's no way you can do this race on blood sugar and glycogen -- you need to be able to burn fat. I think my sugar and electrolyte intake just keeps my brain running normally and my blood sugar from crashing. My "bonk" training (IMO) makes me efficient at converting fat into ATP over a 9 hour period. This is most certainly a case where your mileage may vary...

    Each time I've toed the line at Leadville using these strategies and those preparations, there were probably 200 racers who could beat me in a 25 mile race. But there were never more than 20 who could beat me over the 100 mile race...
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldenboy
    Thoughts on previous 100s’ (LT100 or others) training plans, the course, tips, and even threats are welcomed.
    This will be my 3rd try at breaking 12 hr cutoff (1st and 2nd attempts both ended in the dreaded finish between 12 and 13 hrs, ahh talk about frustrating! )

    What I have learned so far:
    Number 1, ]Nutrition after 6 hrs hard ride time, what works for me under 6 hrs has NO RELATION to what works after 6+ hours. You may want to test Your nutrition strategy on 7+ hr rides!!
    Number 2, Don’t stop racing, sickness (1st and 2nd attempts) and/or mechanicals (2nd attempt) may cost you time but once recovered pick it back up, it is a long race and if you finish with a lot of energy like I did, energy that could have used on the course, well……. You may what to give serious thought to how You plan to handle it when things do not go according to your well thought out plans.

    General: I am sure you are planning on a few pre-rides once the snow is gone, you can look at the posted time checks between aid stations for all prior races, do some rough comparisons to your times (especially the climbs) this should answer any questions about if you are meeting your individual training goals. Note: Part of the course between twin lakes and columbine mine is private/closed so you will need to adjust/guesstimate your time here when comparing to actual race time in this section.

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    #5 this year....

    and the 3rd on a single speed. I have the following recommendations:

    1. DO ride your bike a lot between now and then
    2. as mentioned before nutrition is the most important thing after #1
    3. DO NOT make the race into something it is not, namely anything other than a long ride.
    4. DO NOT obsess over the details..if you have to worry about every minute detail I would assert that you did not do enough of #1
    5. DO show up to the start with the attitude that you will finish...not all aggro style but with the actual confidence that you will finish...remember #3
    6. seems line a lot of folks stress putting in a fair number of 7 - 10 hour efforts before the race. I do not find this productive...if you have done #1 and #2 you should be fine. I generally end up with a few races, the Silver Rush or the Firecracker 50, that are in the 4 to 5 hour range before Pb and lots of rides in the 3 hour range.
    7. DO pre-ride the course if you can and more than once if that is possible. It is very helpful to know what is coming up and how to scale your efforts.
    8. I am a big fan of the Hammer Nutrition products with a few bars thrown in to keep the stomach settled. I say go liquid for fuel.
    9. DO have clear water to drink at all times. There are enough aid stations that you can ride without a camelback if you so desire. 2 years ago I left the Twin Lakes aid station with 2 bottle containing fuel and no clear water. Within 15 minutes of leaving the aid station I could not tolerate the fuel and ended up climbing Columbine without water or fuel. That was a bad mistake and I only survived because I had been hydrating and fueling correctly up to that point.
    10. DO NOT believe that you can follow anyone's advice completely. Take it all in and come up with your own solution...just remember #1 and #2 and #3.
    all single...all the time

  9. #9
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    Good job! Good suggestions

    Quote Originally Posted by 32x18
    and the 3rd on a single speed. I have the following recommendations:

    1. DO ride your bike a lot between now and then
    2. as mentioned before nutrition is the most important thing after #1
    3. DO NOT make the race into something it is not, namely anything other than a long ride.
    4. DO NOT obsess over the details..if you have to worry about every minute detail I would assert that you did not do enough of #1
    5. DO show up to the start with the attitude that you will finish...not all aggro style but with the actual confidence that you will finish...remember #3
    6. seems line a lot of folks stress putting in a fair number of 7 - 10 hour efforts before the race. I do not find this productive...if you have done #1 and #2 you should be fine. I generally end up with a few races, the Silver Rush or the Firecracker 50, that are in the 4 to 5 hour range before Pb and lots of rides in the 3 hour range.
    7. DO pre-ride the course if you can and more than once if that is possible. It is very helpful to know what is coming up and how to scale your efforts.
    8. I am a big fan of the Hammer Nutrition products with a few bars thrown in to keep the stomach settled. I say go liquid for fuel.
    9. DO have clear water to drink at all times. There are enough aid stations that you can ride without a camelback if you so desire. 2 years ago I left the Twin Lakes aid station with 2 bottle containing fuel and no clear water. Within 15 minutes of leaving the aid station I could not tolerate the fuel and ended up climbing Columbine without water or fuel. That was a bad mistake and I only survived because I had been hydrating and fueling correctly up to that point.
    10. DO NOT believe that you can follow anyone's advice completely. Take it all in and come up with your own solution...just remember #1 and #2 and #3.
    Good job 32x18. Some of the best advice I've seen for endurance rides.

    #3 - a fun long ride with a bunch of fun folks who are into doing fun long rides. Have fun!

    #6 - is a very interesting bit and I agree that 7-10 hr. rides are not necessarily a good, regular "training" tool, while many others would disagree. However, having said that, if you've never gone that long, getting one or two long, long rides under your belt is good for the experience of going long and knowing how you'll feel and what you'll need both mentally and physically.

    #7 - helps in some respects but I love a mystery and for me a little bit of the unknown helps me keep the pedals spinning and looking for the next curve in the trail/road. That's why I can't stand the thought of going around and around and around and around in endless loops at a 24 hr. event.

    #8 - Amen.

    #10 -

    And PeT - also with very interesting advice!

    #1 - total body strength = absolutely! Get some gym work in if you can and get the core muscles strong. Don't overdo it.

    #2 - pace = critical! YOUR pace, not someone else's.

    #3 - the cheering fans, spectators and support folks whether they be friends or strangers are giving you energy; feel it, accept it and use it. Nothing is more motivating when you are tired than to have some good people cheering you on.

    #4 - bonk training. Oh man, that can be painful if you do it and fall apart but I've been there. I'm not totally convinced it's necessary but I also think it makes you stronger if not physically then mentally. I'd become more experienced (like PeT definitely is) before delving into this realm.

    So, as you can see, part of the fun is in the preparation. Good luck and most of all enjoy!!
    Last edited by edemtbs; 03-20-2006 at 10:28 AM.

  10. #10
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    For me, it's a race...

    Quote Originally Posted by 32x18
    3. DO NOT make the race into something it is not, namely anything other than a long ride.
    I don't ascribe to this idea. I can and do undertake long rides all the time, and typically in a lot more interesting places than the Leadville route. Furthermore, I'm not willing to pay in excess of $200 just for a long supported ride. I am willing to pay that much for the right to test my mettle against a lot of like-minded loons, and to have a goal for the season. I might not be contending for the win, but I'm sure as hell there to ride it as fast as I can. Last year I raced The Endurance 100 in Park City and ended up more-or-less crashing out, mostly because I was over-matched by the course. The promoter, Boris, recommended that I should just go for the finish next time, but that's not why I sign up for these things. We do these things for our own reasons, but for me it's a race. I get no satisfaction out of just riding the event, I need to be racing!
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by PeT
    I don't ascribe to this idea. I can and do undertake long rides all the time, and typically in a lot more interesting places than the Leadville route. Furthermore, I'm not willing to pay in excess of $200 just for a long supported ride. I am willing to pay that much for the right to test my mettle against a lot of like-minded loons, and to have a goal for the season. I might not be contending for the win, but I'm sure as hell there to ride it as fast as I can. I get no satisfaction out of just riding the event, I need to be racing!
    Note that I still describe it as a race and you seemed to miss my point.

    Quote Originally Posted by 32x18
    3. DO NOT make the race into something it is not, namely anything other than a long ride.
    goldenboy seemed to be asking for info about how to approach the race. I am out there to finish as fast a possible and it is a race. That said, I see a fair amount of people that get all worked up about the "race" and fail to finish for that exact reason. They are the ones yelling at their support crew, scowling at the spectators/racers and failing because they have programmed themselves to believe everything has to be perfect or it will all fall apart.

    Each time I roll out in the Leadville I have no doubt that I will finish. I am not worried about crossing the line and I can focus on the race. How often do you roll out on a long ride and wonder if you can finish...if you can make it back? I would guess not often and if you can apply the same confidence to the race you can actually race and not sweat the small stuff.

    Quote Originally Posted by PeT
    I can and do undertake long rides all the time, and typically in a lot more interesting places than the Leadville route.
    Glad to hear that you get to ride in more interesting places.

    Quote Originally Posted by PeT
    I am willing to pay that much for the right to test my mettle against a lot of like-minded loons, and to have a goal for the season.
    Guess I should have included this

    #11 I believe you should not hang your entire season on this one race. Take the pressure off and you may find you actually do better.

    Quote Originally Posted by PeT
    I might not be contending for the win, but I'm sure as hell there to ride it as fast as I can. I get no satisfaction out of just riding the event, I need to be racing!
    Hate to hear you find no joy in the event, just the racing. Not to be a jackass but I have to ask are you one of the many that sprint from the start, can't hold a line on the pavement and have near pile ups before St. Kevins all in the name of "racing"?
    all single...all the time

  12. #12
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    It's a ride first...

    Quote Originally Posted by PeT
    I don't ascribe to this idea. I can and do undertake long rides all the time, and typically in a lot more interesting places than the Leadville route. Furthermore, I'm not willing to pay in excess of $200 just for a long supported ride. I am willing to pay that much for the right to test my mettle against a lot of like-minded loons, and to have a goal for the season. I might not be contending for the win, but I'm sure as hell there to ride it as fast as I can. Last year I raced The Endurance 100 in Park City and ended up more-or-less crashing out, mostly because I was over-matched by the course. The promoter, Boris, recommended that I should just go for the finish next time, but that's not why I sign up for these things. We do these things for our own reasons, but for me it's a race. I get no satisfaction out of just riding the event, I need to be racing!
    I understand your point but I do not make a living by racing. I enter these "races" as a way to have fun, meet new people, maintain fitness through motivation and sure, to pit myself against some great riders. But my approach is more mellow than putting all my eggs in one basket by focusing on purely the race aspect - I don't think I could do it, I'd be stressed more than I already am. I approach the ride as a fun objective to finish. Once I start the ride, set the right pace and begin to warm up, the race mentality kicks in and I begin to push the envelope and turn on the gas as the ride progresses. But I'm also just as apt to hang out and chat with the rider next to me who is struggling up a difficult climb, I'll stop (very briefly) to say thanks to the volunteers, etc.

    So point taken, I think it depends on understanding your goals just as you do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 32x18
    Note that I still describe it as a race and you seemed to miss my point.
    I apologize, as I seem to have offended you. I realize that virtually everyone there is trying to do the best they can -- I didn't mean to imply that you were suggesting people dog it to be sure they finish. I like to treat it as a race and bring intensity to the event -- that works for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by 32x18
    Guess I should have included this


    #11 I believe you should not hang your entire season on this one race. Take the pressure off and you may find you actually do better.



    Hate to hear you find no joy in the event, just the racing.
    Man, but you read a lot of bs into a simple philosophical difference. I have a great time at Leadville, where I have had modest success in terms of finishing times and placing. I had a great time at Park City, where I was overmatched and ended up DNF. I have one major racing event -- it's what my life allows. I race to train, so having one event as a goal is fine for me and success or failure at that event doesn't define my season or my life.

    Quote Originally Posted by 32x18
    Not to be a jackass but I have to ask are you one of the many that sprint from the start, can't hold a line on the pavement and have near pile ups before St. Kevins all in the name of "racing"?
    You didn't appear to be a jackass before, but now...
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

  14. #14
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    ed e, mentor of DEATH

    Quote Originally Posted by edemtbs
    ...But I'm also just as apt to hang out and chat with the rider next to me who is struggling up a difficult climb...
    Yeah Ed, I bet you do. Probably ask the poor chap questions that can't really be answered briefly. You seem so nice, but beneath that exterior lurks the heart of a brutal, chatty, killer.

    I think that any disagreement here is just trouble with semantics. The advice, "DO NOT make the race into something it is not, namely anything other than a long ride." sounded to me sort of like 'don't have the mindset you have during an X/C race'. The original poster has no prior mtb race experience, but I think it's good basic advice.

    For somebody at my level, where finishing within 12 hours requires that I treat the day quite a bit like a race, it can be unclear that it's still wise to stop to put on a jacket or make sure you have the fluids you'll need before blazing out of an aid station, rather than scurrying through the whole experience with a half-exhausted, half-terrifed look on your face.

    Obviously there's a difference between any bike race and ordinary fun or training rides. But there's also a difference between racing Leadville and racing a team lap at the 24 hours of Moab. Leadville is not only longer, it's also just different. Passing is almost never an issue, and you're free to ride your own pace at all times. Flog yourself as much as you want. But in a day like the Leadville day, digging too deep right now might mean that the bag's not very full next time you reach in there. Endurance is more of a brain game than X/C, which is what I think of when I think of racing.

    For anybody's 1st race: primary goal should be to finish. Secondary goal should be to have the experience, either to learn for future, or to decide whether you like racing at all, or whatever.

    To the original poster I'll say that. Learn about the race, talk to people who've done it. Pre-ride sections of the course. Figure out how to train, then train. Plenty. Experience the preparation process. Figure out your food. Then show up and have a day. Actually, have a whole weekend, because that's the way it's designed to work. By all means, be there for the orientation meeting and Ken's speech on Friday night. Classic.

    See you there.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by PeT
    You didn't appear to be a jackass before, but now...
    Good man...if I throw a bit out I expect a bit back

    Quote Originally Posted by PeT
    I race to train, so having one event as a goal is fine for me and success or failure at that event doesn't define my season or my life.
    Perfect...as it should be. I wish everyone had that attitude with limited time and events. Too many hang their hat on a single goal and their measure of sucess is too narrow.

    Will you be joining us this year in Leadville?
    all single...all the time

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    Quote Originally Posted by 32x18
    Will you be joining us this year in Leadville?
    Unforturnately not... I'll be out of the country in August, so my target race for the summer needs to be earlier. I'm thinking the Firecracker 50 as my race on a single bike and the Laramie Enduro on the tandem. I've done two other 100 mile races (Durango MTB100 and The Endurance 100), and although it costs a few dollars more the Leadville 100 is the best of the three. However, I am partial to the costs and courses of the Firecracker and Laramie Enduro...
    "The plural of anecdote is not data." -- Attributed to various people in a variety of forms, but always worth remembering...

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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by PeT
    Unforturnately not... I'll be out of the country in August, so my target race for the summer needs to be earlier. I'm thinking the Firecracker 50 as my race on a single bike and the Laramie Enduro on the tandem. I've done two other 100 mile races (Durango MTB100 and The Endurance 100), and although it costs a few dollars more the Leadville 100 is the best of the three. However, I am partial to the costs and courses of the Firecracker and Laramie Enduro...
    Maybe I'll finally see/meet you and your daughter riding that tandem at Laramie this year! Good luck.

  18. #18
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by TomP
    Yeah Ed, I bet you do. Probably ask the poor chap questions that can't really be answered briefly. You seem so nice, but beneath that exterior lurks the heart of a brutal, chatty, killer.

    I think that any disagreement here is just trouble with semantics. The advice, "DO NOT make the race into something it is not, namely anything other than a long ride." sounded to me sort of like 'don't have the mindset you have during an X/C race'. The original poster has no prior mtb race experience, but I think it's good basic advice.

    For somebody at my level, where finishing within 12 hours requires that I treat the day quite a bit like a race, it can be unclear that it's still wise to stop to put on a jacket or make sure you have the fluids you'll need before blazing out of an aid station, rather than scurrying through the whole experience with a half-exhausted, half-terrifed look on your face.

    Obviously there's a difference between any bike race and ordinary fun or training rides. But there's also a difference between racing Leadville and racing a team lap at the 24 hours of Moab. Leadville is not only longer, it's also just different. Passing is almost never an issue, and you're free to ride your own pace at all times. Flog yourself as much as you want. But in a day like the Leadville day, digging too deep right now might mean that the bag's not very full next time you reach in there. Endurance is more of a brain game than X/C, which is what I think of when I think of racing.

    For anybody's 1st race: primary goal should be to finish. Secondary goal should be to have the experience, either to learn for future, or to decide whether you like racing at all, or whatever.

    To the original poster I'll say that. Learn about the race, talk to people who've done it. Pre-ride sections of the course. Figure out how to train, then train. Plenty. Experience the preparation process. Figure out your food. Then show up and have a day. Actually, have a whole weekend, because that's the way it's designed to work. By all means, be there for the orientation meeting and Ken's speech on Friday night. Classic.

    See you there.
    Well it certainly seems like we've given Goldenboy (op) something to think about

    Heheh - I'm lucky if I even SEE anyone on the course at your race TomP, never mind TALK to them. I remember one time at Silver Rush some guy, miSSionary where are you, he chatted me up as we climbed and climbed and climbed. As I slowly turned into mush he rode away from me - nice strategy

    I think you make some nice clarifications and I agree and it's where I was coming from. For someone's 1st race it's all about the experience and finishing, especially a race as long as Leadville. But to each his own and everyone's goals and desires are different. I really think it's the journey to get to that great day as much as it is the day itself.

    Peace!

  19. #19
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    Great Insights Here!

    To the original poster; As you can see all of us endurance NUTS seem to be coming up with slightly different approaches and answers to your questions, everyone does seem to have to find what works best for them!

    I wish I had done the type of homework you seem to be doing before my first set of endurance events, would have saved me a lot of unnecessary mistakes. I am getting lots of new angles/ideas from these postings, thanks .

    For me, the Search for the ever elusive ‘right combination’ of essentials (training, nutrition, equipment, preparation, etc.) that lets me ‘maximize’ my personal potential is a Big New Satisfaction vs. the particular combination that I learned previously from years of recreational mtb riding and racing lots of shorter/typical XC events.

    Enjoy your individual ‘Journey to Leadville’ and enjoy the Race on your Terms.

    See you there in Aug !

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    Quote Originally Posted by edemtbs
    I remember one time at Silver Rush some guy, miSSionary where are you, he chatted me up as we climbed and climbed and climbed. As I slowly turned into mush he rode away from me - nice strategy

    I think you make some nice clarifications and I agree and it's where I was coming from. For someone's 1st race it's all about the experience and finishing, especially a race as long as Leadville. But to each his own and everyone's goals and desires are different. I really think it's the journey to get to that great day as much as it is the day itself.

    Peace!
    Ha ha ha, I'm here edemtbs, but you gotta throw in the part about your flats and the whole aspect of my turning to mush as well!! I have been wanting to comment but have not done so as I think all the given advice has been great!!
    Ed, coming back to the Silver Rush for 2006??
    Black Sheep...where it'ss at!!
    "I'm not known for my patience. Patience is a polite quality and often appropriate, but it rarely gets things done. Impatience, however, is the hunger for results and intolerance for excuses and delays." LA

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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP
    Yeah Ed, I bet you do. Probably ask the poor chap questions that can't really be answered briefly. You seem so nice, but beneath that exterior lurks the heart of a brutal, chatty, killer.
    Don't know how well TomP knows Ed, but coming from a guy that puts in quite a few miles with him -- seems like he has Ed pegged perfectly! Especially that mentor of death thing!

    Goldenboy - This being your first mountain bike race and a 100-miler at that, I would say take it easy (don't get caught up in racing other people) at least until you get to the Columbine Climb. IMHO, the Columbine Climb isn't the hardest. I believe the hardest part of Leadville is the powerline and the 2 subsequent notable climbs (St. Kevins/the Boulevard). Very hard ending to a 100-mile race.

    Best of luck!
    Half fast, not slow, not fast... just half fast.

  22. #22
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    I don't know him well enough...

    Quote Originally Posted by s.s. spike
    Don't know how well TomP knows Ed...
    ...but I know he's a heckuva nice guy, and interesting to chat with. We had some long talks before the race. Once for near an hour in Safeway.

    He showed up among the first to come to Salida preparing for last year's Vapor Trail 125. He had a rigid bigwheel waltworks singlespeed, and he looked like he was pretty fit. But I remember thinking, this guy is too nice of a fellow to be a real badass. I wonder if he's going to be OK out there on the big, bad vapor trail? I'll have to give him a word of encouragement when I see him out there on race day.

    Ha. Ed did just fine. He finished 5th place, 2nd place SS, about 15 clicks behind Curiak. Ed was fine. And smiling as he rolled in to the finish.

    Missed my chance to ride with Ed a couple times last year. Hope to fix that this year.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  23. #23
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    thanks for the memories

    Wow, that's a great bunch of responses. And the ‘keep it real’ stuff helped. I had been reading too much info on different training techniques. I was getting so bogged down in all those rules and methods frustration had built up when I wasn’t reaching my set goals. Hence the original post.

    I was forgetting some of the reasons why I started this quest in the first place - creating too many complicating rules and regulations wasn’t one of them. “Endurance distance” riding is something I have already enjoyed doing and I wanted to push it further, enhance it. This July, after 12 years together, the Mrs and I are expecting our first rugrat; we are mid 30s so some lifestyle adjustments are going to made. She has her endurance trial and I wanted one too. I wanted to be selfish while I still could, and maybe refine my biking time to get the most out it in the future.

    I know that bike riding does consume a lot of my time, whether on or off the bike. As the posts here show, everyone has their own methods that work for them and a lot of people have been running those programs for years. But as we’ve seen with the most elite athletes (thinking Olympians or Armstrong), refining, changing, or even adding training can bring about better results. Most of us here aren’t going to be weighing our low-fat chicken dinners to the grams, but we could always benefit from a different perspective on our habits, food or otherwise.

    I have learned a lot from the posts and don’t want the thread to end here. A thread seems to get the most action when there is a little b!tching involved, I thought about singling out people but I have to get back to work, arg. I’ll be back, you whiny little farts

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    Good job!

    misquote - it snowing, did you know?
    Last edited by corules; 03-21-2006 at 10:23 PM.

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    Dude!!

    Quote Originally Posted by miSSionary
    Ed, coming back to the Silver Rush for 2006??
    Yes, it's in the plan! I want that silver dollar!

  26. #26
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    Me too...

    Quote Originally Posted by edemtbs
    Yes, it's in the plan! I want that silver dollar!
    ...So the race is on then...GAME ON!!
    Black Sheep...where it'ss at!!
    "I'm not known for my patience. Patience is a polite quality and often appropriate, but it rarely gets things done. Impatience, however, is the hunger for results and intolerance for excuses and delays." LA

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    And Many More Miles To Go....

    Quote Originally Posted by TomP
    ...but I know he's a heckuva nice guy, and interesting to chat with. We had some long talks before the race. Once for near an hour in Safeway.

    He showed up among the first to come to Salida preparing for last year's Vapor Trail 125. He had a rigid bigwheel waltworks singlespeed, and he looked like he was pretty fit. But I remember thinking, this guy is too nice of a fellow to be a real badass. I wonder if he's going to be OK out there on the big, bad vapor trail? I'll have to give him a word of encouragement when I see him out there on race day.

    Ha. Ed did just fine. He finished 5th place, 2nd place SS, about 15 clicks behind Curiak. Ed was fine. And smiling as he rolled in to the finish.

    Missed my chance to ride with Ed a couple times last year. Hope to fix that this year.
    Yup, S.S.Spike is always pushing me (and my buttons), never let's me rest and makes me a better rider. There are many more miles to enjoy Spike!

    TomP - I don't know what to say other than thanks, I will be down your way this spring and I'm keeping an eye on that July 4th ride.

  28. #28
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    Sweet

    Quote Originally Posted by edemtbs
    TomP - I don't know what to say other than thanks, I will be down your way this spring and I'm keeping an eye on that July 4th ride.
    It is a GREAT ride Ed!!
    Black Sheep...where it'ss at!!
    "I'm not known for my patience. Patience is a polite quality and often appropriate, but it rarely gets things done. Impatience, however, is the hunger for results and intolerance for excuses and delays." LA

  29. #29
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    Good job!

    Quote Originally Posted by goldenboy
    Wow, that's a great bunch of responses. And the ‘keep it real’ stuff helped. I had been reading too much info on different training techniques. I was getting so bogged down in all those rules and methods frustration had built up when I wasn’t reaching my set goals. Hence the original post.

    I was forgetting some of the reasons why I started this quest in the first place - creating too many complicating rules and regulations wasn’t one of them. “Endurance distance” riding is something I have already enjoyed doing and I wanted to push it further, enhance it. This July, after 12 years together, the Mrs and I are expecting our first rugrat; we are mid 30s so some lifestyle adjustments are going to made. She has her endurance trial and I wanted one too. I wanted to be selfish while I still could, and maybe refine my biking time to get the most out it in the future.

    I have learned a lot from the posts and don’t want the thread to end here. A thread seems to get the most action when there is a little b!tching involved, I thought about singling out people but I have to get back to work, arg. I’ll be back, you whiny little farts
    First of all congrats to you and the Mrs.!!

    In the end it's simple; you carry only what you absolutely need, you pedal, you drink, you eat, you get help if/when you need it and you finish. As you train over the months leading up to the ride, listen to your body more and not your mind so much (controversial?). My suggestion, if you get into a more elite race status, if you plan to get serious and win categories, then start adding the more detailed focus and planning.

    32x18 mentioned pre-riding the course, and that truly is important even though I like a little bit of mystery in my rides. What it helps with is setting expectations and goals; short term, medium term and the BIG ones (Columbine, Powerline climbs, etc.). I break races down into goals in my mind and as I knock them down I feel great. It also allows me to prepare for the tough sections - I know what's coming up so I let up on the gas, drink and eat if I know a really tough section is looming and I can mentally prepare for it. I would not say you have to pre-ride the entire course, just get a lay of the land, do some of the nasty sections, etc.

    Finally, I always take the time to look at the scenery during the course of the ride. Always! I really look around and go "Wow, this is so freakin' beautiful, how lucky am I!!" It is a great relief from the race stress and it refreshes your mind.

    Ok, so I blew it and added more info for you to think about

    Good luck and spin easy!
    Last edited by edemtbs; 03-22-2006 at 09:29 AM.

  30. #30
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    more from the under-privileged, please

    There are a lot of top riders here with a lot of valuable experience, and their advice is well heeded. Racers or sponsored riders will be approaching this differently; (I used to race pro snowboards) and they are always on their game - practiced, primed, and perfected. A lot of things can be taken for granted.

    I also liked the mid-/back-of-the-packers honest responses. Those riders are probably doing the ride for similar reasons as myself. And admitting, albeit anonymously, that you dnf'd or bonked takes courage. Your recommendations and stories about the race are a lot more inspiring. Your 'failed' training plans and nutrition bloopers might be just as helpful as experienced advice. I always root for the underdog, you are my heros. I hope you kick ass this year!

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by edemtbs
    Finally, I always take the time to look at the scenery during the course of the ride.
    Riding it on a single speed you have plenty of time "to look at the scenery" between Pipeline and Twin Lakes.
    all single...all the time

  32. #32
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    Idea

    Quote Originally Posted by 32x18
    Riding it on a single speed you have plenty of time "to look at the scenery" between Pipeline and Twin Lakes.
    That or hide there waiting to stick something in 32X18's spokes to slow him down!! Dan you riding this Sunday, everything here is bad.
    Black Sheep...where it'ss at!!
    "I'm not known for my patience. Patience is a polite quality and often appropriate, but it rarely gets things done. Impatience, however, is the hunger for results and intolerance for excuses and delays." LA

  33. #33
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    There's an LT100 discussion group...

    where probably every conceivable question someone might have about the Leadville 100 has been discussed. Go to the www.leadvilletrail100.com web site for the link. I haven't checked it in a few years, but I assume it's the same.

    This year will be my 6th. For me, the most usefull training is to ride long road rides, like double centuries, or shorter road rides with lots of climbing. They prepare you for spending long hours on a bike, and give you experience in pacing, fueling, hydration, and electrolyte intake. You have to "keep your eye on the ball", or you'll fail. Same with the LT100.

    My other advice it to come up a week early and enjoy Leadville. The Boom Days festival is the weekend before the race. I enjoy hanging out with my friends, going for rides in the area or farther away (rode Monarch Crest last year), and just enjoying the Colorado high country. And then there's Ken's big pep rally and the spagetti dinner. The race is only half the fun.
    Tequila is a pallid flame that passes through walls and soars over tile roofs to allay despair. A. Mutis

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