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  1. #1
    Daniel the Dog
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    Healthy body after season feels good

    I seemed to pick up nagging injury after nagging injury during the race season. I was riding today and felt great. No Achilles Tendon pain, wrist pain, knee soreness, etc. I am not sure how to avoid injuries because I fall, get overuse injuries, etc.

    What do you guys do to avoid injuries in season?

  2. #2
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    Recovery first. Then ride again.

  3. #3
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    More days off each week as I get older.
    The drive towards achievement and success is the motive power of civilization.

  4. #4
    FKA Malibu412
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo View Post
    What do you guys do to avoid injuries in season?
    Sit on the sidelines and watch, in a padded suit.

    Actually unavoidable for me, it seems. Falling and injuries that is. A race tangle with another rider caused a severe right thumb sprain early in cross season and slowed my fall riding way down. Racing was done for the year. It was a repeat of the Summer of '11.

    I am now evaluating the types of riding and racing that I do and for 2013 will be doing the types of events that create less exposure for me and keep me on the bike more. Still chances for injury but at almost 50, I ain't no spring chicken and have to ride smarter.

    Jay, are you doing Red to Red next year?
    "I love the bike. It's my meditation. I think I'm bike-sexual." -Robin Williams

  5. #5
    Daniel the Dog
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    Absolutely!

    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412 View Post
    Sit on the sidelines and watch, in a padded suit.

    Actually unavoidable for me, it seems. Falling and injuries that is. A race tangle with another rider caused a severe right thumb sprain early in cross season and slowed my fall riding way down. Racing was done for the year. It was a repeat of the Summer of '11.

    I am now evaluating the types of riding and racing that I do and for 2013 will be doing the types of events that create less exposure for me and keep me on the bike more. Still chances for injury but at almost 50, I ain't no spring chicken and have to ride smarter.

    Jay, are you doing Red to Red next year?

    I started doing cross this year and love it! I used to be an only all mountain guy and have spread out my interests into other areas of cycling. I'm okay with aches and pains to compete and have fun. I just like not having them.

    I think Red to Red may be the coolest cross country race of the year. The town of Echo is interesting and the whole desert riding thing is fun. I will definitely be up there in March.

  6. #6
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    In an endurance race, I walk when I think I cannot ride it. At 57, I do okay but I want to keep riding and being hurt kinda hinders that.

  7. #7
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    RECOVERY, but from some of the things that you say hurt, I have to ask if your bike has been fitted professionally? You would be amazed at what doesnt hurt on a properly fitted bike.

  8. #8
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I've been getting more structured over time.

    When I wanted to come back from a knee injury I picked up many years ago, I did some PT, paid for a professional fit on my 'A' bike at the time, and followed a very conservative 10%/week build pattern from a pretty low volume. That led into being able to ride like I meant it and not think about anything else in 2008. I hadn't been able to do that since college, so I was pretty pleased. Since then, I've mostly been having pretty good luck around injuries (knock on wood) although I did fall and hurt my shoulder this season. Lifting weights during the off season is supposed to help with that. I promised myself I'd do that this year, then worked out my training hours and decided I don't have time.

    Anyway, I'm becoming more and more of a believer in following a program. At least a basic one, in which I'm riding enough per week to support my long ride and I get to a long enough long ride before an endurance race that I'm not wondering how the last quarter's going to feel. I think it's the sudden increases in mileage (like when the weather stops sucking, maybe?) and sometimes also the individual much, much longer rides that tend to get people hurt. Work up to 'em, and neither is so bad anymore. This season, I'm having another shot at following Friel. We'll see how it goes, but I'm hoping for a stronger, faster me, despite the rest of my life getting harder to schedule riding around.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  9. #9
    Daniel the Dog
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    I really enjoy lifting weight and feel so much stronger when I do. I'm not sure I am but I feel better. It does let me avoid the tiny upper body strong leg thing I lifted right after the season and my legs were sore I could barely walk despite a long season of races. I was kind of surprised by that.

    I tend to go on a few road races a ride and go to the gym in the crappy weather part of the year in Washington. I do dream of second home in Utah or Arizona. My SAAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) gets back this time of the year and all I want to do is get in my car and drive south I'm not kidding....

  10. #10
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Slow twitch and improved vascularization vs. fast twitch, hypertrophy and improved muscle fiber recruitment. You've just found more anecdotal evidence to support all this stuff.

    Gym time with good form and an emphasis on free weights and lower weight/higher rep is supposed to help some with overuse injuries. Of course, it needs to be a well-rounded workout. I think the biggest thing is really just avoiding sudden, big changes in volume, both ride volume and total. I think stretching helps, even if studies are having a hard time finding anything really clear about it one way or the other. I like to stretch after a ride or run - I want to be nice and relaxed, and not tense and weird for the rest of the day. Sometimes helps me sleep too.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  11. #11
    Team Velveeta™
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo View Post
    I really enjoy lifting weight and feel so much stronger when I do. I'm not sure I am but I feel better. It does let me avoid the tiny upper body strong leg thing ...
    I really need to work on core strength and tricep/shoulder strength this winter. Sometimes on a 10+ hour ride I find that my triceps get so wacked from just dealing with the shocks of downhill and holding myself up that they get feeling shakey, like they're going to fail out on me. I'm not sure I could do more then 10 sit-ups or 2 push-ups. Room for improvement!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo View Post
    ...I tend to go on a few road races a ride and go to the gym in the crappy weather part of the year in Washington. I do dream of second home in Utah or Arizona. My SAAD (Seasonal Affective Disorder) gets back this time of the year and all I want to do is get in my car and drive south I'm not kidding....
    I'm right there with you brother. We have way more sunshine this time of year than you folks do, but there's something about the low slanting colorless light that just guts me. And that it doesn't get light until 7am and gets dark by 5pm. Tucson is my drug of choice. If I could pull it off I'd be down there by Nov 1 every year. The light isn't much different and the days aren't any much longer, but shorts and short sleeves do quite a bit to improve my mood!
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

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  12. #12
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    The last 3 years I've went to the gym during the off-season. This year I was starting back, couldn't make myself get out of the car. Being that unmotivated before going in the first time I would be wasting my money. So I left.
    I don't know if weight training helped my riding, it did give me a more "solid" feeling. My job requires pushing and pulling so that's my resistance training this year.
    I feel healthy all year for the most part, barring injury due to crash. I get wore down first 2 months of training after that I maybe sore the day after a real hard ride.
    Comas aren't as fun as riding your bike, so wear a Helmet.

  13. #13
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    I hear you on the triceps, Tom, and Speed, I share your antipathy towards going to the gym.

    I make do with a half hour home routine using dumbells, sit ups, push ups, and back exercises. Twice a week in-season, and triples in the bleak winter season. 12, 20, and 30 pounders cover the bases for me at home,and I get to choose the music AND VOLUME SETTING.

    Like Linda, I'm a fan of stretching, but only after a workout, and nothing really that fancy.
    The drive towards achievement and success is the motive power of civilization.

  14. #14
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I can't say I hold myself up with my arms on my bike. For me, cleaner technique has been all about quieter hands and more relaxed arms, and driving the bike from the hip. Actually it feels more and more like skiing to me.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  15. #15
    Team Velveeta™
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I can't say I hold myself up with my arms on my bike. For me, cleaner technique has been all about quieter hands and more relaxed arms, and driving the bike from the hip. Actually it feels more and more like skiing to me.
    Not even when you're doing a technical descent? Lots of the long rides I do involve long climbs broken up with tech descents that can be as much as half hour/45 minutes at a time. Like the Vapor Trail 125 course for example. I don't know how triceps can really be isolated from a bumpy descent... do you?
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  16. #16
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I'm not saying I don't use my arms. They just don't support a lot of weight. Obviously when I'm getting bumped and thrown around, it's harder to stay relaxed, and sometimes I want to loft or dive the front end of the bike on purpose; my arms are a part of that. I still do most of the work with my legs. My arms help me stay stable over my pedals.

    I dunno, maybe if I had a different background, I'd find I needed to do more crosstraining for my arms. I worked as a stagehand for several years, did dance before that, etc. But as it is, if my bike fits me right, it's a non-issue.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by TomP View Post
    Not even when you're doing a technical descent? Lots of the long rides I do involve long climbs broken up with tech descents that can be as much as half hour/45 minutes at a time. Like the Vapor Trail 125 course for example. I don't know how triceps can really be isolated from a bumpy descent... do you?
    It truly does depend on the course. The Creampuff especially works the triceps during the last 15-ish mile descent. The Capitol Forest 100? Never really noticed them during the entire race.
    The drive towards achievement and success is the motive power of civilization.

  18. #18
    It's carbon dontcha know.
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    Coming back down Alpine fast works the sphincter too
    Rolling on 29", 650b, 8.3" and 23mm

  19. #19
    renaissance cyclist
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    I give credit for my lack of repetitive motion injuries to my strength and flexibility training off the bike… might just be luck and genetics though. Unfortunately, there is nothing you can do to make falling safe.

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