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  1. #26
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    Titanium 29er, softtail. I run 120mm fork on mine but I tend to ride a lot of rough stuff and the bike was built for 120 fork whereas most softtails are not.

  2. #27
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    Love my Anthem 29

  3. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    120mm front and rear is overkill and a lot of bike to be hauling around. A really light, 100mm FS 29er is the best bike you could get. IMO.
    I definitely agree...for endurance racing. I raced the Silver Rush 50 on my Niner RIP 9, and even at only 26 lbs, I was really wishing I had a lighter bike with less travel. The 120mm up front and 4.5" in the rear were nice, but way overkill for an event like that. However, it's the perfect choice for me if I'm heading out for a long, casual day in the saddle where we're stopping, taking our time, etc....just not at race intensity the whole time.

    I am currently building up a Niner Air 9 RDO for endurance events in 2013. Hopefully I don't regret jumping to other end of the spectrum with regards to my bike.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    One of the fastest guys I know is a dentist.
    Me too. His excellant schedule, long lunches, and Friday's off afford him plenty of time to train. And he never has to worry about money ever.
    Thanks to www.weavercycleworks.com for my awesome bike frames!

  5. #30
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    Hope so too

    Quote Originally Posted by chrisgardner73 View Post
    I definitely agree...for endurance racing. I raced the Silver Rush 50 on my Niner RIP 9, and even at only 26 lbs, I was really wishing I had a lighter bike with less travel. The 120mm up front and 4.5" in the rear were nice, but way overkill for an event like that. However, it's the perfect choice for me if I'm heading out for a long, casual day in the saddle where we're stopping, taking our time, etc....just not at race intensity the whole time.

    I am currently building up a Niner Air 9 RDO for endurance events in 2013. Hopefully I don't regret jumping to other end of the spectrum with regards to my bike.
    I have been riding a Jet 9 RDO and it is very fast and light. HT's just soak the life out of me in the NW. Too darn harsh!

  6. #31
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    Hm. I'm wondering where the comfort from FS starts to balance out with the extra weight, when cost is an issue. I'm sure it's possible to build up/buy a 23 lb FS 29er, but not on my budget.

    7 hours into that 10 hour race, I was really wishing I had FS, but if I did, I might have spent every climb wishing I didn't.

  7. #32
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    +1 for the anthem 29

  8. #33
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    Hmmm

    Quote Originally Posted by Manicmtbr View Post
    Me too. His excellant schedule, long lunches, and Friday's off afford him plenty of time to train. And he never has to worry about money ever.
    You know this guy? Becoming a dentist is a huge task with big debt. Besides, dentist's and other high earners go bankrupt all the time...it isn't always what you make but what you spend. I hear being a dentist can be hard because everyone fears you...

  9. #34
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    You are right. There are several companies making sub 24lb FS 29ers now. The catch is, they are all uber expensive. I mentioned it before but I think they are the perfect bike. All the best things I've found in a bike, wrapped into one package. I found a way to get mine (Anthem Advanced X29er 0) and am blown away by the things it is capable of and how I feel after a long ride.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Golden_Monkey View Post
    Hm. I'm wondering where the comfort from FS starts to balance out with the extra weight, when cost is an issue. I'm sure it's possible to build up/buy a 23 lb FS 29er, but not on my budget.

    7 hours into that 10 hour race, I was really wishing I had FS, but if I did, I might have spent every climb wishing I didn't.
    Average race Hardtail carbon 29r 20-22lb

    My Epic evo 22.5... I'll give them that half pound.
    2014 S-Works Epic WC
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  11. #36
    Desert RAT
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    Rigid Vassago Jabberwocky SS,the most comfortable bike I have ever owned!

  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joshua_B View Post
    Rigid Vassago Jabberwocky SS,the most comfortable bike I have ever owned!
    Sicko.
    2014 S-Works Epic WC
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  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo View Post
    I hear being a dentist can be hard because everyone fears you...

    Friends don let friends ride road bikes.
    http://www.facebook.com/mikebmiller

  14. #39
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    It's interesting reading some of the replies to this thread. For my endurance bike, I was looking for a XC 29er with a little bit longer legs, but still a racey feel. I've had a spearfish for a year now and I'm just not settled on it.

    Looking through this thread, there are a lot of hardtails being mentioned, which makes me think that I should do a new 29er hardtail with big tires on it.

    This has sparked a search in me.

  15. #40
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    I am 58 and do them on the Stumpjumper 29 hard tail and feel quite ok afterwards other than generally cramping legs.

  16. #41
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    Get an Epic 29er if you waht confort or a Stumpjumper HT or similar for faster times

  17. #42
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    Can you say more about your experience with the Spearfish? What don't you like versus what you like? How would a HT 29er be better, in your estimation? Curious minds want to know...

    Quote Originally Posted by Jnthomps08 View Post
    It's interesting reading some of the replies to this thread. For my endurance bike, I was looking for a XC 29er with a little bit longer legs, but still a racey feel. I've had a spearfish for a year now and I'm just not settled on it.

    Looking through this thread, there are a lot of hardtails being mentioned, which makes me think that I should do a new 29er hardtail with big tires on it.

    This has sparked a search in me.
    The great use of life is to spend it for something that will outlast it.
    William James

  18. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by insighter View Post
    Can you say more about your experience with the Spearfish? What don't you like versus what you like? How would a HT 29er be better, in your estimation? Curious minds want to know...
    I'll be glad to talk more about the Spearfish. Before I start, let me preference this review of sorts with saying that I ride in Pisgah National Forest in western North Carolina. I had the Spearfish set up more for Pisgah and my 29er HT set up for racing.

    Pisgah trails look a lot like this:



    It's pretty rough. There is a lot of climbing on fire and forest service roads and a lot of the descending is forest single track with roots, rocks, and black bears.

    The other area I ride looks like this:



    It's more groomed and built for different skill levels.


    My bike was built up from a frame. Reba RL with blackbox damper up front with a Fox RP23 kashima on the rear. Sram X9 drivetrain with XT brakes. Industry 9 hubs on Stans Flows. I had a 2x10 with 39/26 rings on an XT crank. I was happy with the weight of the build; I thought it was sturdy enough to ride hard, but nothing on there that I wouldnt replace if I broke it.

    For trails like the second picture, the Spearfish was awesome. It climbed well on modest grades and descended tame singletrack very smoothly and confidently. After a half a dozen rides or so, I started calling it the Rocketfish.

    When it came to riding in Pisgah proper, though (like the first pic) I was disappointed with how the bike climbed. Steeper grades (trail and gravel) produced noticeable bob in the shock. If I adjusted the shock to reduce the bob, then the bike descended trails much like a hardtail. In short, it climbed like I expect a bigger bike would, but did not descend like I though it should.

    I was really drawn to the simple linkage and look of the Spearfish, but I decided that if a bike was going to climb with noticeable bob, then I would want more travel on the downhill. Likewise, if it was going to descend like a hardtail, then I want weight savings and efficiency when climbing.

    I demoed a Trek Superfly 100 and was blown away: stiff on the climbs; a rocket on the descnets. I just bought a Rumblefish (no Superflys at the shop) and, even though it has 120mm of travel in the rear, with the propedal on, it is super stiff. I stand and climb all the time, something that I could not do on the Salsa.

    For trails like the second picture, the Spearfish was great. For Pisgah, not so much for this rider. With that being said, I know of two guys that ride and race Spearfish in Pisgah and they are much faster than me, even if I'm on the Rumblefish. So it goes.

    Hope that helps.

  19. #44
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    The Anthem is sounding better all the time. Think it's my #1 pick now.

  20. #45
    Arrrghhh!!!
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    Thanks. That is helpful to know about the Spearfish, and it provides a sense of where that bike will shine.
    I rode Pisgah a bit when I was living down that way, though I spent more time in the Wilson Creek area. Great riding.


    Quote Originally Posted by Jnthomps08 View Post
    I'll be glad to talk more about the Spearfish. Before I start, let me preference this review of sorts with saying that I ride in Pisgah National Forest in western North Carolina. I had the Spearfish set up more for Pisgah and my 29er HT set up for racing.

    Pisgah trails look a lot like this:



    It's pretty rough. There is a lot of climbing on fire and forest service roads and a lot of the descending is forest single track with roots, rocks, and black bears.

    The other area I ride looks like this:



    It's more groomed and built for different skill levels.


    My bike was built up from a frame. Reba RL with blackbox damper up front with a Fox RP23 kashima on the rear. Sram X9 drivetrain with XT brakes. Industry 9 hubs on Stans Flows. I had a 2x10 with 39/26 rings on an XT crank. I was happy with the weight of the build; I thought it was sturdy enough to ride hard, but nothing on there that I wouldnt replace if I broke it.

    For trails like the second picture, the Spearfish was awesome. It climbed well on modest grades and descended tame singletrack very smoothly and confidently. After a half a dozen rides or so, I started calling it the Rocketfish.

    When it came to riding in Pisgah proper, though (like the first pic) I was disappointed with how the bike climbed. Steeper grades (trail and gravel) produced noticeable bob in the shock. If I adjusted the shock to reduce the bob, then the bike descended trails much like a hardtail. In short, it climbed like I expect a bigger bike would, but did not descend like I though it should.

    I was really drawn to the simple linkage and look of the Spearfish, but I decided that if a bike was going to climb with noticeable bob, then I would want more travel on the downhill. Likewise, if it was going to descend like a hardtail, then I want weight savings and efficiency when climbing.

    I demoed a Trek Superfly 100 and was blown away: stiff on the climbs; a rocket on the descnets. I just bought a Rumblefish (no Superflys at the shop) and, even though it has 120mm of travel in the rear, with the propedal on, it is super stiff. I stand and climb all the time, something that I could not do on the Salsa.

    For trails like the second picture, the Spearfish was great. For Pisgah, not so much for this rider. With that being said, I know of two guys that ride and race Spearfish in Pisgah and they are much faster than me, even if I'm on the Rumblefish. So it goes.

    Hope that helps.
    The great use of life is to spend it for something that will outlast it.
    William James

  21. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jnthomps08 View Post
    I'll be glad to talk more about the Spearfish. Before I start, let me preference this review of sorts with saying that I ride in Pisgah National Forest in western North Carolina. I had the Spearfish set up more for Pisgah and my 29er HT set up for racing.

    Pisgah trails look a lot like this:

    (See image in post above)

    It's pretty rough. There is a lot of climbing on fire and forest service roads and a lot of the descending is forest single track with roots, rocks, and black bears.

    The other area I ride looks like this:

    (See image in post above)

    It's more groomed and built for different skill levels.


    My bike was built up from a frame. Reba RL with blackbox damper up front with a Fox RP23 kashima on the rear. Sram X9 drivetrain with XT brakes. Industry 9 hubs on Stans Flows. I had a 2x10 with 39/26 rings on an XT crank. I was happy with the weight of the build; I thought it was sturdy enough to ride hard, but nothing on there that I wouldnt replace if I broke it.

    For trails like the second picture, the Spearfish was awesome. It climbed well on modest grades and descended tame singletrack very smoothly and confidently. After a half a dozen rides or so, I started calling it the Rocketfish.

    When it came to riding in Pisgah proper, though (like the first pic) I was disappointed with how the bike climbed. Steeper grades (trail and gravel) produced noticeable bob in the shock. If I adjusted the shock to reduce the bob, then the bike descended trails much like a hardtail. In short, it climbed like I expect a bigger bike would, but did not descend like I though it should.

    I was really drawn to the simple linkage and look of the Spearfish, but I decided that if a bike was going to climb with noticeable bob, then I would want more travel on the downhill. Likewise, if it was going to descend like a hardtail, then I want weight savings and efficiency when climbing.

    I demoed a Trek Superfly 100 and was blown away: stiff on the climbs; a rocket on the descnets. I just bought a Rumblefish (no Superflys at the shop) and, even though it has 120mm of travel in the rear, with the propedal on, it is super stiff. I stand and climb all the time, something that I could not do on the Salsa.

    For trails like the second picture, the Spearfish was great. For Pisgah, not so much for this rider. With that being said, I know of two guys that ride and race Spearfish in Pisgah and they are much faster than me, even if I'm on the Rumblefish. So it goes.

    Hope that helps.
    Thanks for that detail. It really does help. I'm new to mountain biking and am about to purchase a bike to ride a trail that looks (in two different sections) just like your two photos; loose, rumbly and steep up one side and fairly groomed down the other.

    It's for a daily commute, I don't need to go fast, and I'll get to know the track very well. its also only about 7 miles in either direction. I need to purchase a bike soon and only have specialized to choose from at my local bike store. I'm leaning towards the fully rigid Stumpjumper expert evo R hardtail. It comes in at just under 9kgs (19.6lbs). Am I being too interested in weight; do I need front suspension on trails like you've shown here?

    I can't find any reviews of the Stumpy evo R ht online, and can't get to ride one over the trails before I purchase, so I'm reeling on other's advice.

    Any suggestions? Thank you!

  22. #47
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    It seems to me the most popular endurance bikes are 29er hardtails, but like many have said here, there certainly isn't any reason you cant go on whatever bike you have.
    The bike only makes a big difference after you've maxed out your ability potential.

  23. #48
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    I've been riding a Tallboy for about a year now. It's a good all around bike and will handle pretty much anything you can throw at it. It's built up to about 25lbs. I did a 50 mile race on it and did really well. It was really too much bike for the course I was on, but still I was very happy with it. Recently picked up a Ti Hardtail 29er set up 1X10 and only slightly lighter than the TB. I was very surprised to see my times on climbs less than a mile dropping by over a minute as well as my times on most descents being pretty close to the Tallboy. The HT is much more harsh and is not fun in rough trails, but is fast on everything else. So it really depends on the types of terrain you are riding and how good your lower back is. On a shorter race I wouldn't hesitate to take the HT, but on a longer race, or more technical course, probably taking the TB.

  24. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrWild View Post
    Thanks for that detail. It really does help. I'm new to mountain biking and am about to purchase a bike to ride a trail that looks (in two different sections) just like your two photos; loose, rumbly and steep up one side and fairly groomed down the other.

    It's for a daily commute, I don't need to go fast, and I'll get to know the track very well. its also only about 7 miles in either direction. I need to purchase a bike soon and only have specialized to choose from at my local bike store. I'm leaning towards the fully rigid Stumpjumper expert evo R hardtail. It comes in at just under 9kgs (19.6lbs). Am I being too interested in weight; do I need front suspension on trails like you've shown here?

    I can't find any reviews of the Stumpy evo R ht online, and can't get to ride one over the trails before I purchase, so I'm reeling on other's advice.

    Any suggestions? Thank you!
    If your trails are anything like Pisgah, you definitely need front suspension and I would recommend full suspension, especially on an endurance race. Pisgah has a lot of loose rocks, it's rough in places, drops of 1-3 feet if you take the fast line, roots, and a lot of the stuff I mentioned. The fastest guys may be on 29er hardtails and I own one too, but my back is feeling it by the end of 30 mile races. I haven't attempted an endurance race on the 29 hardtail yet. When compared to my 26 anthem where I raced 12 hours solo and didn't have any pain or discomfort. I would never want to race an endurance race on a fully rigid bike. Go with comfort over weight, my friend. It's not a big deal at the end of the day. It's around 2 pounds. More importantly, get a bike that pedals very efficient like the Anthem. I haven't ridden a lot of other full suspension bikes to tell you how well they pedal. I'm not trying to advertise for Giant. It is really the only one I am familiar with and comfortable recommending.

    Edit: I recommend making your own thread so you can get more feedback.
    There is not much choice between rotten apples.

  25. #50
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    Many seem to be focused on what's the best on race day. For me a Masters (46) Endurance racer its what I use in training that helps me stay fresh recover faster and able to ride again the next day. In my case through trail and error, numerous injury and recovery periods its a FS 29er. Jet 9 RDO with a 120mm front,
    but any major brand with a quality product woutd work.

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