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  1. #1
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    E100 vs. CCP100 and/or TransRockies

    Hi,

    I'm looking for some opinions from people who have done the E100 and either the CCP100 or the TR. I've done the latter two, twice for both races, and am considering the E100 (100km version) this summer. My specific concern is elevation. I live at 3500', ride between 3500'/5500', and see the E100 course is laid out between 6500'/10,000'. Ouch!

    If you've done the TR, what would you say the singletrack on the E100 is comparable to on the TR route? I'm trying to imagine racing 100kms of Alberta/BC singletrack and know that would be painful.

    Other questions for Park City locals. Are there any good (aka "hot showers") camping facilities within a 15 minute drive to the race start? I'd like to get down there at least 3 days in advance of the race, do some riding, while keeping my costs to a minimum. Alternatively, is the Carriage House hotel complex a good price/location option?

    Your input on these, or any other comparisons you may have, are greatly appreciated.

    Cheers,
    Dave

    Calgary, Alberta
    Canada

  2. #2
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    E100 - 100k

    Dave, I am not a Park City local nor have I done the CC100 or Trans Rockies. So why am I responding to your post?

    I highly recommend the E100 - 100K race! I did the E100 50 mile version last year and I plan to do the 100K version this year. The event is well run, the course is super fun, and Park City is a great place to visit in late August.

    I like to look at finishing times for comparable distances to get an idea of how tough a course is. For example, the 2005 Laramie Enduro 111K took the top 5 finishers from 5:23 to 6:12 to complete. The 2005 E100 - 100K took the top 5 finishers from 7:19 to 8:36 complete. The E100 is almost all singletrack, with lots of climbing, and requires that you pay attention 100% of the time.

    The Carriage House is only about 10 minutes from the parking lot at the Canyons so that location is fine. I stayed at the Prospector last year but this year I will stay at the Canyons for convenience.

  3. #3
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    Talk to Boris!

    Dave,

    not sure why I'm answering either, I haven't done the CCP or TR. Jon Baker has done the CCP and E100 several times each if I understand correctly. You can find him on the E100 website forum board. He's a great guy.

    I've done the E50, E100, 12 hours of Park City and dropped out of the E100 once. It's a tough race! From what I've read, not having much firsthand experience, it's THE toughest 100 mile race. That being said, the trails are incredible. Think of riding tight, sometimes technical singletrack all day, sun up to sun down. It's dreamy and were it not for the pain it would feel that way too. I highly recommend it.

    For lodging, contact Boris, race organizer. He's a top notch person and can steer you.

    I live in SL. If you arrive days early, call to ride. I know the course well (as I'm sure many others do).

  4. #4
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    Hi Dave -

    Is it supposed to be easy? Heck no! It will just blow you away to ride so much single track in a day!! Don't miss it is my advice. I've done the CCP a couple of times and I finished in the 10:30-11:30 hour range. The E100 took me 12:30.

    You should be fine in terms of the E100 single track - it is pretty sweet. Haven't done the TR yet, but I hear you guys up there in Canada have it a little more technical. The trail gets ridden alot up there in park city, so it is usually more on the smoother side than the bumpy. The thing that sticks out in my mind is that on the traverses and downhill singletrack you are constantly weaving and turning. Never a straight section to let your guard down. DON'T BLINK you might go off the trail.

    There are a couple of single track climbs/decents that are more techincal with roots and rocks, etc to spice it up.

    I usually find myself thinking about dropping out halfway up the climbs in the E100, but then you get a super nice shot of single track, forget about the last climb, and start up the next one for another round.

    I would reccomend getting here a couple days early to scope some the sections of the course out and get acclimated. The altitude shouldn't be to bad on you if you are getting up to 5 or 6000 feet up your way, although it is easy for me to say since I've been living at higher altitude my whole life. If you can swing the E50 too, that would be a great warm-up for the big show.

    Baker

  5. #5
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    TR rules

    There is lots, and lots of singletrack on the TR. That being said, it is all rideable. Almost every stages does have at least 20-30km of gravel road though, and some stages have a few 10-15km stints on the paved stuff.

    How technical it gets really depends on how much it rains............it can get realy, really, really muddy.

    -bob

    ps. brush up on your hike-a-bikes and waist deep water crossings.

  6. #6
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    If you've done the Trans Rockies race, I would think the E100 is certainly doable. I did the 100K last year without any endurance racing experience. It is hard, and the sligthly technical nature of the trail, and huge vertical (18,000 for the 100mi) makes it even more so..... but from what I've read, the TR is harder, being a multi-day, bad weather, death march and all.

    The E100 is a great race. I'm definitely returning this year.

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