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  1. #1
    The 5th knuckle
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    Changing Bikes from 1x10 to SS - Change in training plan

    In years past I've done one or two races a year. Mostly to give me something to plan for and be engaged. I normally like to ride the Ridgeline Rampage because it's in my back yard, and the Breck 68 because it kicks the living snot out of me. I didn't do anything this past season and I'm fat and not really motivated about much. I need to change that. I recently bought a new SS that I was drooling over and ended up selling my 1x10 to finance it and keep the political scene neutral around the house.

    I have my training plans for years past to use as a baseline - How do I modify them for a SS season? Or do I at all?
    Quote Originally Posted by Hernando Gutierrez
    The only thing you have to figure out is don't fall down. To keep riding the bike.

  2. #2
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    Just keep doing what you've been do but now its on the SS it's atomatic. You need more quick burst power on a SS to clear short kickers but during your normal rides you'll have to attack them anyways so that's what I mean by automatic. Don't be afraid to change your gearing around a bit to see if you like it better shorter or taller.

    I've got a 34t front and 17-20t options for the rear. In one month I've used each one for different areas but the 34t-20t is probably going to stay my fun rides choice, with the rest being for races.
    Last edited by RojoRacing53; 11-07-2013 at 12:34 PM.

  3. #3
    The 5th knuckle
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    Excellent - thank you.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hernando Gutierrez
    The only thing you have to figure out is don't fall down. To keep riding the bike.

  4. #4
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    Put some time in with sustained standing efforts. Unless you're going to gear for spinning out on the climbs which will be a hamster wheel on the flats, you will need to get accustomed to standing for longer periods. I do this with training rides. I will either do sustained 20min+ standing efforts or a hill climb that takes an hour to complete and stand up on 80% of it.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetboy23 View Post
    Put some time in with sustained standing efforts. Unless you're going to gear for spinning out on the climbs which will be a hamster wheel on the flats, you will need to get accustomed to standing for longer periods. I do this with training rides. I will either do sustained 20min+ standing efforts or a hill climb that takes an hour to complete and stand up on 80% of it.
    I'm actually switching back to SS from1x10 myself.A year and a half ago I went SS and loved it.Geared was an experiment which is now finished.That said the idea stated as far as being out of the saddle for extended periods is very important.On the climbs maybe as long as 30 min.Also considering your either rigid or hardtail on semi to technical terrain you'll be out of the saddle too.In the end you may find your upperbody including core suffer more then the legs.

  6. #6
    The 5th knuckle
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    Standing and hammering it is then. I wussed out this past week and only hit the rollers. Hanging up the skirt tomorrow morning and getting real dirt under the tires.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hernando Gutierrez
    The only thing you have to figure out is don't fall down. To keep riding the bike.

  7. #7
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    I have done a few 100 mile races on my ss and one of them was the breck 100....OUCH!!! In years past I trained at 32x21 and tried to slowly build up my strength with an easier gear and my only agenda was finishing. Last year I said screw it and switched to 32x19 and decided I am either going to blow up or finish at much faster pace. A few races I blew up and one of the 100 mile races I knocked an hour off my time. I have a few friends who race ss as well and they train with base miles to start and then start to push a really tough pace. If you have a few races on your radar I would stick with the gear you are going to use for the race.

  8. #8
    The 5th knuckle
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    Quote Originally Posted by cbrock450 View Post
    If you have a few races on your radar I would stick with the gear you are going to use for the race.
    I'm running a belt drive and to change gearing is a $100 lets see if this works idea. I'm running the equivalent of a 32x20 now. Like you said I'll either do it and finish well or be drinking beer early.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hernando Gutierrez
    The only thing you have to figure out is don't fall down. To keep riding the bike.

  9. #9
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    Do occasional low cadence, high torque, training rides on a road bike. Don't stand up. Develop this kind of seated power to help avoid having to stand too much on the SS during 10 hour races.
    The drive towards achievement and success is the motive power of civilization.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    Do occasional low cadence, high torque, training rides on a road bike. Don't stand up. Develop this kind of seated power to help avoid having to stand too much on the SS during 10 hour races.
    Just a difference of opinion and preference but I love standing up for long periods during a 24hr race. If the course has a long gradual incline like a couple % I'll make sure to gear the bike a little taller so I can comfortably stand the whole way without spinning out. I will say I'm a bit odd when it comes to Mtb style but its hard to argue with the results.

    Try both and do what works best for you, options are always good to have.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by RojoRacing53 View Post
    Just a difference of opinion and preference but I love standing up for long periods during a 24hr race. If the course has a long gradual incline like a couple % I'll make sure to gear the bike a little taller so I can comfortably stand the whole way without spinning out. I will say I'm a bit odd when it comes to Mtb style but its hard to argue with the results.

    Try both and do what works best for you, options are always good to have.
    I hear you, and to be clear, I certainly didn't mean to avoid standing. It's good to have what I'll call the "Three Basic Pedaling Techniques" in an endurance race: regular spinning, standing, and seated, lower cadence stuff. I find that helps equally exhaust all my muscle groups, in order to ensure maximum, but equally distributed, pain on the day after the race!
    The drive towards achievement and success is the motive power of civilization.

  12. #12
    The 5th knuckle
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    .... in order to ensure maximum, but equally distributed, pain on the day after the race!
    Non-preferential punishment. I can get on board with that.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hernando Gutierrez
    The only thing you have to figure out is don't fall down. To keep riding the bike.

  13. #13
    Hairshirt Rider
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    Are you targeting the RME marathon or 1/2 marathon races and are you riding for fun and to finish or for PR times? Lot's of different ways to get to both those goals but since you are asking for advice....

    If you are going for PR times then I'd keep a road bike in the mix for recovery, tempo and steady state rides. I have found this to be helpful. Strava your regular climbs on the SS and use those as a benchmark. Not so much for KOM bragging rights but it is an easy way to keep track of those efforts. I suppose adding some workouts that get your legs ready for spinning a fast cadence would be good but I've never bothered. As the race gets close I have found that for the longer endurance events where my finish time is pushing 6 hours I do better with back to back days with 1/2 of finish time rides. Easier to recover from that then from a 6+ hour day in the saddle.

    If the goal is fun and finish ride the SS, and ride it a lot.

    Your gearing is perfect for the CO races. The only time I have geared from 32/20 was Voodoo Fire and Peaceful Valley where I went 32/19

  14. #14
    The 5th knuckle
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    They are the RME marathons and I'd like to hit some PR's. I'd like to hit the sub 5 hour mark for Ridgeline.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hernando Gutierrez
    The only thing you have to figure out is don't fall down. To keep riding the bike.

  15. #15
    Daniel the Dog
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    Are you single speeding these days? I am doing a lot of riding on my SS. It is a fun new thing for me but I can't climb steeper climbs without standing up and cranking. I'm not sure I want to do it in a race but getting a quick workout it works.

    I do believe you create more power standing up but for long races it would be too taxing to stay standing for me.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo View Post
    I do believe you create more power standing up but for long races it would be too taxing to stay standing for me.
    Don't think like that, if you use the right technique when standing and pedaling you can do so for long periods of time without any huge deficit. Once you get past thinking standing can only be done for a short time and only at the cost of efficiency then you will stop mentally handicapping yourself and with practice it'll be just as effective as spinning the lower gears.

    I'm still new to single speed so maybe I do things a bit different then others because the few SS guys I've ridden with think my style and ability to climb stuff the geared guys have trouble with is a bit odd. Yes I'm very strong but with a little shorter gearing the same things can be done by other riders as well.

    Never stop hammering

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