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  1. #26
    Daniel the Dog
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    Circus,

    He is messing with me a bit...having fun. No worries.

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo View Post
    I was thinking of going 24-32-42 on my XTR 9 speed with a 11-34 in back. I'm thinking I could use the 24 only in the steepest climbs, use the 32 for mellow climbs, and the 42 on dirt roads and mellow downhills. I know you have more of a chance for cross chaining and chain drop at times.
    Yes! Best performance here will be on a 650b bike.
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  3. #28
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    I am looking at new bikes at the moment and I know that I will miss that Granny on the steep climbs if I go 2x10. But it seems to me that if I want a well spec'd bike, (my current HT is XT/XTR and my FSR X9/X0), maybe carbon, then I am stuck with 2x10. And if I go 29", the ratio's are worse/higher aren't they? If I look at road bikes, there is often a 3-ring option but that doesn't seem to be the case in MTB world. Am I missing something vital?

  4. #29
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    26/39 with an 11/36 cassette is ~2 gears higher than than a 22/32/44 with an 11/34 cassette so no big dramas there.
    I've ridden 2x10 with an 11/36 and it is a better system as you are not changing the rings halfway through climbs to get to a lower gear but my 22/32/44 11/34 XT 9 speed still has plenty of life in it and IMHO 2x10 is not worth dropping a grand on a new drive train for when my current 3x9 does the job perfectly well. It isn't that much better, I can'tsee myself improving my my overall distance by very much if any.
    BTW Stumpy UK - Shimano are still making high end MTB triples so should be no problem there - they have stopped making top end road triples - duraace is all double now.

    EDIT got my maths fouled up new something wasn't right - 26/36 is a gear ratio of 0.7222
    22/30 is 0.7333 - so you are effectively only loosing 1 gear
    Last edited by SimpleJon; 10-10-2012 at 03:07 AM.

  5. #30
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    I like the 3x because I generally ride on the road to the trailhead.
    I'm stilll running 3x8 on 3 of my bikes and a 3x9 on my new 2012 Salsa Fargo.
    It is hard to justify changing drivetrains just to have the latest and greatest.
    If I raced it might be different and I ride alone 98% of the time (hence, no peer group pressure).
    The truth will set you free... But first it will piss you off

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by SimpleJon View Post
    26/39 with an 11/36 cassette is ~2 gears higher than than a 22/32/44 with an 11/34 cassette so no big dramas there.
    I've ridden 2x10 with an 11/36 and it is a better system as you are not changing the rings halfway through climbs to get to a lower gear but my 22/32/44 11/34 XT 9 speed still has plenty of life in it and IMHO 2x10 is not worth dropping a grand on a new drive train for when my current 3x9 does the job perfectly well. It isn't that much better, I can'tsee myself improving my my overall distance by very much if any.
    BTW Stumpy UK - Shimano are still making high end MTB triples so should be no problem there - they have stopped making top end road triples - duraace is all double now.

    EDIT got my maths fouled up new something wasn't right - 26/36 is a gear ratio of 0.7222
    22/30 is 0.7333 - so you are effectively only loosing 1 gear
    How much is 0.0111 (gear) anywhey?

  7. #32
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    All my bikes will be converted to 1x10 over the winter months. 1x10 is life changing.
    2014 S-Works Epic WC
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  8. #33
    Helmetless Crasher
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    Triple is the way to go for me. Where I ride/race, I spin-out the big ring, albeit not for very long. This = about 32 mph. I have passed many people going down that fast gnarly hill who have spun-out at much lower speeds - they are helpless as I (and anyone else w/ proper gears) get by them.

    Similarly, there are some long steep climbs at the end of long rides that get the granny. Nobody I ride with hits these w/ the middle ring - it would be a torture test of will.

    I need/enjoy all 3 rings - I think.
    '95 M2 StumpJumper FS
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  9. #34
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    My simple answer is I like both. the 2x10 is more efficient from a shifting standpoint as I feel I shift less & fewer gears overlap. With a 3x9 you can't beat the low granny gear at about hour 20 in a 24 solo when your legs are gone. For endurance races I like to have one of each. If I only had one bike at my disposal I'd opt for the 3x9 to cover all bases.

  10. #35
    Team Velveetaô
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    How Low do you need to Go?

    Quote Originally Posted by mtbne1 View Post
    My simple answer is I like both. the 2x10 is more efficient from a shifting standpoint as I feel I shift less & fewer gears overlap. With a 3x9 you can't beat the low granny gear at about hour 20 in a 24 solo when your legs are gone. For endurance races I like to have one of each. If I only had one bike at my disposal I'd opt for the 3x9 to cover all bases.
    I think that really captures it.

    Do you never need a 22:34 or 22:36? Double or 1x is probably fine for you.

    The top end high gear needs of most mountain bikers can be covered by any 36+ tooth biggest ring. If you can live with a 26:36 as your lowest low gear, the overlaps between a typical two ring setup cover all the available gears in a three ring setup. So IMO if you don't need the low gear that you can get by having a 22T small ring, a double or 1x is probably totally adequate for you.

    I ride a 29. I weigh almost 200 lbs. I often ride with a heavy pack. My full suspension bike weighs ~30 lbs. My favorite ride starts with a half hour false flat and then goes to 3 full hours of climbing without a break. Starts at 7,000 feet tops out at 11,300 feet. I could do it with the lowest gear available on a 2x setup, but that last half hour would be less fun. If I rode a 26" wheeled bike the ratio would be that much milder and it might work. But I don't.

    If you're a 145 lb greyhound, or you're just a strong rider and you never use your low gears, go for it. I use my low gears here in CO. Lots. If I want to grunt I ride my SS. If I'm bothering to have a geared bike, I want one that has a full useful range of gears.

    I sometimes spend a couple hours on the small ring, and I shift between the lowest 4 or even 5 gears on the cluster. When running in the middle ring, I rarely use the lowest or highest sprocket, and preferably stay in the middle 5 (I run 9 speed). And I use the big ring not just for going super fast downhill on the road, but for technical downhill to keep the chain tension high so I don't have the chain jumping off the ring or swinging into the spokes. If you have one of those fancy new clutch rear derailleurs chain tension doesn't vary so that isn't a factor. But I don't have one of those and don't plan to for years. My SRAM x.9 9 speed stuff is bomber.
    Tom Purvis - Salida, CO - http://teamvelveeta.tom-purvis.com

    "I like my wimmen like I like my beer--cold and bitter!"

  11. #36
    Feral Roadie
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbsbiker View Post
    How much is 0.0111 (gear) anywhey?
    It depends on your crank length, wheel size and tire diameter. Sheldon's Browns Gain Ratio Calculator gives you the complete mechanical advantage of any particular gear setup.

    I've got my own code that plots the speed vs rpms for any given gear and even if you pick a relatively narrow range ( 70 - 90 or whatever makes your knees happy ), gears have to be on the order of 5% different to make any noticable change at all.

  12. #37
    renaissance cyclist
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    Iím indifferent to the 2x10. I donít often use the full range of gears on my 3x10; in fact for most rides Iím ok on my 1x8 bike (although that bike is fully rigid). On my 3x10 I live on my middle ring 95 percent of the time and only shift to the other rings for particularly long/steep climbs and descents. I question whether having fewer chain rings would result in less shifting between them as the transition between the big and small rings seems to be right in the middle of gear ratios I use most often. Either way, I donít use the full range of available gears on a 3x10, so can understand the feasibility of running a 2x10 and probably will someday if/when the right bike selling for the right price happens to have one.

  13. #38
    Let's fly!
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    My Spec Epic 29er came with 2x10. I swapped it for 3x10 immediately. I live, ride, and race in Colorado -- mostly front range, race in Winter Park, have done the Leadville 100 twice (sub-9 once). I ride with people of varying abilities, so I sometimes use the granny/36t. We have some gradual downhills where big ring comes in very handy. On the steep sections of the LT100, I was doing 65rpm and watching 2x10ers grinding it out at 50rpm. Very happy to have the granny/36t.

    The 3x has a lower low and a higher high. I value both.
    '13 Spec Epic 29er, '09 Orbea CX, '12 Cannondale SuperSix, '08 Spec Transition, '06 Simtra Trials (sold), Yamaha YZ450 (sold)

  14. #39
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    Having 3 choices is better than 2 . Good on flat and always there for you on long grinding climb like Columbine.

  15. #40
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    I Have a S-works Epic 29r. Came with the 2*10 (24/38) and 11/36 cassette. I'm 66 and not that strong. Found the 2*10 bloody awful for climbing. Modified the gearing to 20/36 front rings. The FD could just handle it. But found i ran out of revs on long downhills. So modified it to 3*10 with 20x30x40 front rings. The 20 front gives the same revs*speed as a 26r with a 22 front ring. This I found to perfect for me for long distance stuff. However for shorter (30 mile) rides a 2*10, 20/34 with 11/36was better. So now i switch between 2*10 (for my local trails) and 3*10 depending on the event, downhill speed and climbing grades. I only switch if doing an event that 'requires' it, otherwise I ride 20/34 front rings

    Esentially its that old saying - horses for courses - what suits me may not suit you. If 3*9/10 is better for you on your terrain then use it. If 2*10 suits you better, then use it

  16. #41
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    Considered trading my triple for a double but couldn't find 2x gearing that suited me.

    90% of my trail riding is done in the small ring of my triple (22t) and I find myself resorting to my 22t front ring and 34t rear cog on almost every ride that I do. Just can't give up the easy gears.

    Then there are the rides to get to the trail that I use to justify the big ring (44t).

    For the range of gearing that my triple gives me I couldn't find a double that I wouldn't have to give up something on one end or the other. That and my triple is fully functional. Had a hard time justifying the $ to replace something that just works.

  17. #42
    psycho cyclo addict
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    Heck Yah!

    44/32/22 Shimano LX w/ 11-34 XT and White Industries 38/32/20 w/12-34 XTR 9-speed on my geared 29er's (running 32 - 16 on my SS 29er). Both setups have been bullet proof. I've ridden 2x10 like 5 times and found it to be too finicky - shifting strangeness, dropped chains and not a huge gearing advantage. Switching between chain rings isn't something I have trouble with or do very often but they sure come in handy ~5% of the time.

  18. #43
    Shut up and ride
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    Been riding and racing 1x9 for 5 years now.

    No interest in ever going back to a triple.

  19. #44
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    Any of you ever consider a 3 x 10?

  20. #45
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    I have a 1x9, 2x9, and a 3x9 setup on my bike. I can quickly switch between setups with just a press of my thumb or index finger. I really like my bash guard that doubles as a chain-ring too.

  21. #46
    Twin Six METAL Team
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    I used to ride a 3x9, but switched to singlespeed about 5 years ago...and never looked back! Until I moved to CO earlier this year and decided to build a full-suspension with 2x10. Honestly, I don't think I could ever go back to a triple. The 2x10 works fine for everything I've encountered so far. Granted, I've only ridden in/around Colorado Springs, Castle Rock, Leadville, Salida, Monarch Crest, etc. So...I'm sure there's something out there that might make me think twice! Until then though, I'll stick with 2x10 (and my SS)...or if I demo it and like it...maybe even 1x11 (SRAM XX1).

  22. #47
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    Don't get me wrong, if I was buying a new bike that had 2x10 on it, I'd be happy too. For that matter, if I was building a new bike, I'd probably go 2x since there does seem to be more choices available now. I just don't see the point of spending time & money to make such a minor modification to an existing set up.

  23. #48
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    if you are spinning out with a 2x you might just want to replace the big ring with a larger size. i was skeptical of the benifits of 2x when i got my carbon flash 2 (i raced a 1x most of this year and loved the low maintenance care free shifting) but the small ring is great for most trail as well as tough climbs. and if you get on flat fast track parts, the larger ring lets me hammer down. i never really ran into a problem in the two last races i did with this set up.

  24. #49
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    I bought a new mountain bike last week (been out of the loop for a couple years). The bike was at a low price. I couldn't pass it up. It has a triple, I prefer a double.
    I was wondering if you could convert a triple to a double? Say a 40 -28 or something along those lines. A bigger middle and granny?
    Comas aren't as fun as riding your bike, so wear a Helmet.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisgardner73 View Post
    ...or if I demo it and like it...maybe even 1x11 (SRAM XX1).
    I would love to hear anybody's real life experience with the 1x11. I switched from 3x9 on a FS 26'r to 2x10 on a carbon HT 29'r and have been very happy. A lot of that happiness is due to weight loss, but shifting reliability has been a very nice side benefit. Would 1x be nicer? When I did High Cascades this year I noticed a lot of 1x10 rigs and that got me thinking. Anybody out there using 11 speed on long distance rides yet?

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