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  1. #1
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  2. #2
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    Interesting article. Fortunately (I guess) for me, my training level is waaaay below the dangerous range. Still, I'd rather die on my bike than live forever on the couch.

  3. #3
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    Whoa. I hope someone has data to refute this. I don't put in a lot of miles, but I like to push a very high heart rate when racing/climbing.

  4. #4
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    I rather 3 years racing than The Rest of my Life watching The riders pass by

  5. #5
    DLd
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    It's funny (and typical) how all the lazy fatties in the comments (of the article, not here) are trying to use it as justification for not exercising at all, despite it spelling out the clear benefits of moderate exercise. I would like to see what other variables they controlled for, ie. diet, sleep, etc...
    "Great things are not accomplished by those who yield to trends and fads and popular opinion."-Jack Kerouac

  6. #6
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    I skimmed that article, looks like it's more-or-less a repeat of some I've read in the past.

    If I were to write a capsule summary, it would be that training at a competitive level in endurance sports has some risk associated. That shouldn't be news to any of us - does anyone really think pushing past LT and staying there is healthy? Or riding crazy-high volume? I guess 20-25 miles a week isn't a ton of volume, that could be done by someone who runs five days a week with a couple of them longer than mine, but going faster than an eight minute mile is definitely getting to be a higher level of training.

    Meanwhile, the group of people in the study who trained still lived longer than those who didn't. I love the personal attacks in the middle of the article.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  7. #7
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    All you older folks should send me your bikes to watch after so you don't hurt yourselves!

  8. #8
    Daniel the Dog
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    Moderation is the key. If you are spending 12 months a year doing long high intensity activities it probably is not good for your heart. More bad news of out of balance exercise:

    What Causes A Weak Immune System From Over-exercising? | LIVESTRONG.COM

  9. #9
    Unpredictable
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    Quote Originally Posted by DLd View Post
    It's funny (and typical) how all the lazy fatties in the comments (of the article, not here) are trying to use it as justification for not exercising at all, despite it spelling out the clear benefits of moderate exercise. I would like to see what other variables they controlled for, ie. diet, sleep, etc...
    Didn't it say the auhors were both athletes - one who reduced his workload and the other who didn't? I don't remember the lazy fatties.

    At a guess there will be people who handle extreme exertion and those who don't. We accept the association of chronic musculoskeletal injuries as well as overtraining syndrome/viral illness and heavy training, so it's not that great a leap of consciousness to expect the heart to be susceptible to overtraining as well.

    There are a few physiological question marks though. Firstly, exertion raises peripheral blood presssure, but not central pressure (aorta, pulmonary arteries) in general, so is the effect of blood pressure relavent? Given that a lot of atrial fibrillation is triggered from the pulmonary ostia (where the vessels enter the atria), if central hypertension is not the issue (and it may be despite what I just wrote), what is? Is there an association with reduced resistance to infection and heart disease in these people? There certainly have been studies suggesting a link between bugs and coronary heart disease (eg Mycoplasma sp). Without reading the formal study one cannot know if there has been an assessment of subaortic stenosis (overgrowth of the muscle below the aortic valve restricting outlet from the left ventricle) as a cause of increased risk either.

    It is a threat to those who train at maximum level for years to suggest they may be doing themselves harm, but it makes sense doesn't it? The drive to compete and be the fittest, best and stongest is all-consuming for some athletes and probably represents some degree of psych disorder (like the need for repeated plastic surgeries), so regardless of the implications there will always be people who push the envelope. I don't think I could ever be one, but if I was, I would be a little concerned.

  10. #10
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    I call BS on this 'study'


    My Dad has been a runner as long as I can remember, and he is 78 now, and has no signs of slowing down.



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    .

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by RSW42 View Post
    I call BS on this 'study'


    My Dad has been a runner as long as I can remember, and he is 78 now, and has no signs of slowing down.



    .
    Well, there's science right there

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ridnparadise View Post
    Well, there's science right there
    Well played sir.

    One dad > focus group.

    Put that one in the scientific formulas book plz

  13. #13
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    When I read articles like this I think of the people you see doing a full Ironman I have no doubt that doing endurance to that extent is not good for you body
    Small ring in front makes it easier. Small ring in back makes it harder. That blows my mind.

  14. #14
    DLd
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ridnparadise View Post
    Didn't it say the auhors were both athletes - one who reduced his workload and the other who didn't? I don't remember the lazy fatties.
    You missed the part where I specified "in the comments," not "in the article."
    "Great things are not accomplished by those who yield to trends and fads and popular opinion."-Jack Kerouac

  15. #15
    DLd
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lenny7 View Post
    When I read articles like this I think of the people you see doing a full Ironman I have no doubt that doing endurance to that extent is not good for you body
    Yeah, seriously, they should switch to doing 24 hour races on a rigid singlespeed, much better for the body.
    "Great things are not accomplished by those who yield to trends and fads and popular opinion."-Jack Kerouac

  16. #16
    zrm
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    Even in my prime when I was racing a lot I was never an elite athlete although being a solid middle upper pack expert/cat 1 racer is still a pretty fit person) Now that I just race and ride for fun and fitness, I have to admit, I feel better over all than I did then. I get sick less, my body doesn't constantly ache, I may carry around a little more weight, but OTOH I don't look like a concentration camp inmate like I did when I was obsessed with my body fat percentage.

    Racing at an elite level is hard on your body, I don't know too many people who would dispute that. Everyone is different in how they handle it, but regardless of the pace that it happens it wears you down. I don't find it hard to believe that people who regularly push their body to the limit year after year could be shortening their life span.

    Of course as someone already said, 'I'd rather live a couple years less than someone who struggles to get off the couch to waddle to the TV and the kitchen for another piece of fried chicken.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by shrubeck View Post
    Interesting article. Fortunately (I guess) for me, my training level is waaaay below the dangerous range. Still, I'd rather die on my bike than live forever on the couch.
    Well Said!!!

  18. #18
    Daniel the Dog
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    Hmm

    I will tell you I'm a health care worker and I see folks everyday with Type II diabetes, hypertension, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, obesity, and elevated lipids. Most of these folks end up with strokes, heart attacks, kidney disease and other secondary health problems of this Metabolic Syndrome. I mean folks who are 50 cruising around in power chairs. Bad lifestyle choices are way more dangerous then endurance racing. That said, we should all be wise and know our limits..and be smart about this sport. Balance! Oh yaw no one gets out of this life alive

  19. #19
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    Awesome news! I can ride more buy more bike stuff and not worry so much about saving for my old age.
    Mark Farnsworth, Raleigh, NC
    http://farnsworthbikes.com

  20. #20
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    Wow 8 minutes/mile is't that fast. That was about my marathon pace in the ones that I ran. On top of that, the 3:30 it takes to run a marathon at that pace is not a particularly long duration by bike-racing standards. Now that Iím far more dedicated to bike racing I train much harder/longer than when I was running. I wonder, however, how late into life the people in the study were continuing to compete in endurance events. I would almost be willing to bet that that the people who we damaging themselves were the ones who failed to dial it back after reaching their 50ís and 60ís. Of course maybe thatís my optimism bias; Nah, Iím only 32, waaaay too young to be damaging myself by exercising. Although, I've never kidded myself into believing that my 8-12 hours/week of training would help me live any longer than 3/hours per week of moderate exercise and a sensible diet.

  21. #21
    Daniel the Dog
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    I agree

    Quote Originally Posted by debusama View Post
    Wow 8 minutes/mile is't that fast. That was about my marathon pace in the ones that I ran. On top of that, the 3:30 it takes to run a marathon at that pace is not a particularly long duration by bike-racing standards. Now that Iím far more dedicated to bike racing I train much harder/longer than when I was running. I wonder, however, how late into life the people in the study were continuing to compete in endurance events. I would almost be willing to bet that that the people who we damaging themselves were the ones who failed to dial it back after reaching their 50ís and 60ís. Of course maybe thatís my optimism bias; Nah, Iím only 32, waaaay too young to be damaging myself by exercising. Although, I've never kidded myself into believing that my 8-12 hours/week of training would help me live any longer than 3/hours per week of moderate exercise and a sensible diet.
    A guy probably only needs 3 hours of a blend of weight bearing exercise and aerobic exercise to stay healthy. Heck, I see 90+ year old folks who have avoided smoking, drinking, and overeating.

    By the way how the hell did Chevy Chase get so damn old How am I getting so old

  22. #22
    DLd
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    And then for an article that clearly points in the other direction, as who does more intense exercise than Olympians?

    Olympians Live Longer, Study Finds - ABC News

    Perhaps the original study is biased by people using poor training practices and poor nutrition, whereas one might expect an Olympian to be getting those things right...
    "Great things are not accomplished by those who yield to trends and fads and popular opinion."-Jack Kerouac

  23. #23
    BBW
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaybo View Post
    I will tell you I'm a health care worker and I see folks everyday with Type II diabetes, hypertension, hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, obesity, and elevated lipids. Most of these folks end up with strokes, heart attacks, kidney disease and other secondary health problems of this Metabolic Syndrome. I mean folks who are 50 cruising around in power chairs. Bad lifestyle choices are way more dangerous then endurance racing. That said, we should all be wise and know our limits..and be smart about this sport. Balance! Oh yaw no one gets out of this life alive
    ditto
    I would need to read the original study to see how it was conducted but nonetheless every longitudinal study like this shows only a RELATIONSHIP between compared variables, not CAUSE and EFFECT. There are many things involved to determine that.
    On the other hand, I think that dying or not shouldn't be the "take" of this because like Jaybo said, none of us will get out of this alive. The most important thing to me is the quality of life that we get being active.
    The couch potato might live as long as me but I won't be huffing and puffing while trying to make it to the second floor and look/feel 30 years older than what I really am.
    Keep exercising guys, the only risk about living is dying
    BBW. MS, RD

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by zrm View Post
    Racing at an elite level is hard on your body, I don't know too many people who would dispute that. Everyone is different in how they handle it, but regardless of the pace that it happens it wears you down. I don't find it hard to believe that people who regularly push their body to the limit year after year could be shortening their life span.
    I totally agree but I would even change "elite level" to "upper bounds of genetic capability". I know people who are no where near elite but look like hell because they have stayed within a few percentage points of what *appears* to be their genetic maximum for years and years.

  25. #25
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