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  1. #1
    rider
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    8sp vs. 9sp for ultramarathon use?

    8sp is far less touchy to keep in adjustment and seems to last better as well. Is that enough reason to go with it and live with the harder to get parts issue compared to 9sp components?

    Or, I could go totally retro-grouch, and slap on some pre-Hyperglide, Uniglide shimano 6 or 7 speed parts. I have piles of the stuff. Like over 200 rear cogs alone, not to mention all the other supporting parts. The old xt thumbshifters have the friction shift switch option. Funny thing is, in 15 years of riding those thumbshifters, I never had to resort to switching to the friction shifter mode.

    29erchico

  2. #2
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
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    Sounds like you've got enough experience to make a good decision. Stick with what has worked for you in the past.

    I think the most maintenance free setup readily available today is the SRAM 9spd stuff, using twist shifters. X.7, X.9, and X.0 are all basically the same shifter (so save some money and buy the X.7's), and the front/rear der's, chains, and cassettes all work extremely well together.

    In 2000 and 2002 I did the 1100-mile Idita races using the above SRAM setup. Added a click of cable tension at ~350 miles each year, no other maintenace necessary.
    In 2003 I used this setup for the Koko, GLR, and GDR, without changing or lubing cables/housings. Over that two month stretch I added a few clicks of cable tension at the rear shifter, while riding. That's it.
    In 2004 I did the Koko, GDR, and AK Sweet Roll all in about two months time. ~3000 miles of off road racing, with only a few clicks of cable tension needed.

    I loved 8 speed and was reluctant to switch to 9, but I don't find the "more durable/less finicky" argument to be true. YMMV.

    Hope that helps.

    MC

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MikeDee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 29erchico
    8sp is far less touchy to keep in adjustment and seems to last better as well. Is that enough reason to go with it and live with the harder to get parts issue compared to 9sp components?

    Or, I could go totally retro-grouch, and slap on some pre-Hyperglide, Uniglide shimano 6 or 7 speed parts. I have piles of the stuff. Like over 200 rear cogs alone, not to mention all the other supporting parts. The old xt thumbshifters have the friction shift switch option. Funny thing is, in 15 years of riding those thumbshifters, I never had to resort to switching to the friction shifter mode.

    29erchico
    If you can get the low and high gear you want with 8 speed, stick with it. It shifts better and is less liable to give you issues. On the subject of friction shifting, if you bend a derailler hanger or derailler, index shifting doesn't work too well.
    Last edited by MikeDee; 01-18-2006 at 09:13 AM. Reason: Added content.

  4. #4
    TEAM TOPEAK - ERGON
    Reputation: KERKOVEJ's Avatar
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    I'll 2nd the SRAM X-9 set up. I have been on it for 3 years now, and the stuff works 10 times better than Shimano XT that I ran in the past. In addition to the SRAM I run Avid Flakjacket shift housing. I can get through and entire season on that stuff!

    SRAM all the way!
    Last edited by KERKOVEJ; 01-18-2006 at 10:05 AM.

  5. #5
    Exactly 1/2 of 2-Epic
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    recent SRAM convert checking in

    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    In 2000 and 2002 I did the 1100-mile Idita races using the above SRAM setup. Added a click of cable tension at ~350 miles each year, no other maintenace necessary.
    In 2003 I used this setup for the Koko, GLR, and GDR, without changing or lubing cables/housings. Over that two month stretch I added a few clicks of cable tension at the rear shifter, while riding. That's it.
    In 2004 I did the Koko, GDR, and AK Sweet Roll all in about two months time. ~3000 miles of off road racing, with only a few clicks of cable tension needed.
    MC
    dang - never heard of anything cable related lasting that long. What cable system/s do you use, anything special? Anything sealed?

    Since switching to SRAM XO twisties/XO rear in September, I haven't had to touch the system.

    Any trouble shifting when wet?

    Thanks.
    Dave

    Anything is possible. The impossible just takes longer.

    2 Epic

  6. #6
    rider
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    I was thinking that grip shifters might be the way to go. I really like that you can fine tune the front der. rather than just one position for each chainring.

    29erchico

  7. #7
    Exactly 1/2 of 2-Epic
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    Quote Originally Posted by 29erchico
    I was thinking that grip shifters might be the way to go. I really like that you can fine tune the front der. rather than just one position for each chainring.

    29erchico
    Makes sense on paper, but that's the one thing I haven't adjusted to very well. There are 3 "settings" that can work for various gear combos in the middle ring for instance - but only one of them works for all middle ring combos. That's proved to be 3x the choice that I want. It's only a problem when I don't have the mp3 playing...with the mp3 I might not hear the grinding
    Dave

    Anything is possible. The impossible just takes longer.

    2 Epic

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