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  1. #1
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    8-hour enduro race - pace strategy

    In just a month I'll be racing in an 8-hour event and I'm wondering if anybody has any good pace strategies?

    I'm leaning toward this:
    Simply ride at a slow-ish pace the whole time, but very steadily and very consistently. It will take a lot of discipline, but I'll need to learn not to overdo it or run too fast. This will be especially hard when everyone else is passing me. But in the long run I expect to finish, and keep things steady and predictible.

    I'll have a support crew (mechanic, coach) in a pit. Each lap should be 4-5 km long or so, meaning I'll pass the pit often.

    The alternative:
    Nail it from the start, grab a good position, and try to keep it, though risk burning out too early.

    Anybody have any experience with such strategies?

    Thanks.
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  2. #2
    psycho cyclo addict
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    Long and short of it: really depends on the riders' ability to overcome and endure if you push a bit over your limit. My general approach is to think like a train conductor... keep exertion at ~80% all of the time (or wherever rate you feel that you can maintain a consistent pace for the long haul) so you save some reserve for the taxing parts of the course.

    I did a 9-hour in the Spring. Started out faster (not all out but definitely moving at a better clip that shaved 9 minutes off my 1st lap compared to the year before). A friend of mine told me to kill the pace a bit or I would burn out before the end. I did ease up but felt by the end that I had too much left in the tank and could have pushed harder. I'd rather burn and have my body force me to slow down near the end knowing that I put forth maximal effort as opposed to feeling like I backed off. Best of luck.

  3. #3
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    Start slow and end fast is usual recommendation, especially for first endurance race. Start off at about 80% RPE, maybe slightly more. At half-way point you can then determine if you can pick pave up, need to slow down, or maintain.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by krixmeister View Post
    Start slow and end fast is usual recommendation, especially for first endurance race. Start off at about 80% RPE, maybe slightly more. At half-way point you can then determine if you can pick pave up, need to slow down, or maintain.
    Thanks coach
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by krixmeister View Post
    Start slow and end fast is usual recommendation, especially for first endurance race. Start off at about 80% RPE, maybe slightly more. At half-way point you can then determine if you can pick pave up, need to slow down, or maintain.
    Good strategy. I'll add my usual advice for first-time endurance racers: Don't race anybody but yourself. It's easy to get sucked into racing another rider, then not finishing. Most people never give it another go if they don't complete their first event.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    Good strategy. I'll add my usual advice for first-time endurance racers: Don't race anybody but yourself. It's easy to get sucked into racing another rider, then not finishing. Most people never give it another go if they don't complete their first event.
    Yup: Good advice for the first one....

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