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  1. #1
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    60 miler next May, any advice?

    I will be 33 next Jan and want to compete in a 60 mile endurance race. I'm 5'11" maybe 5'10" depending on the day lol, and I weigh 178. I'm in pretty good shape but not nearly good enough to do 60 miles with 5970 feet of elevation gain.

    I've got a lot to work on in the areas of riding efficiency, pacing, and overall cardio.

    For the last few weeks I've been doing intervals on the trainer and while running, and then doing one medium length mountain bike ride on the weekend - about 18-25 miles.

    At the end of 25 miles my legs are cramping pretty bad and I'm totally spent. Luckily my legs are almost fully recovered the next day but it takes about one more day for them to feel 100% when walking up stairs.

    Last weekend I rode 2 days and did about 30 miles total split between the two. This week, after resting 1 day, I went running and felt stronger than ever.

    I can't ride the mtb after work bc it's dark and trails are closed, so my main option is a trainer at the gym or to run in our neighborhood which has some nice hills and is about a 3.75mile loop.

    The race is 60 miles with 5970 feet of elevation gain. I don't want to just finish, I actually would like to be halfway competitive, but I also know the reality that ill be riding against some insanely good riders/athletes.

    So I say all that to simply ask if anyone can offer any wisdom or advice?

    Thank you

  2. #2
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    The way to get good at long rides is to do long rides... Realistically, if you want to be "halfway competitive" in an 60 mile race, you need to get to the point where you're consistently riding 8-10 hrs a week. But you can't just "jump into" that level of training,
    the slower you approach it, the easier it will be to stay there. Small incremental progress every week is the key.

    To "just finish" I would concentrate on that one long ride per week and try and increase it by 5-10% in time each week. It's that one long ride that is going to provide the major training benefit, the rest of your training is "training to train". i.e. working on improving your ability to recover to do the next long ride.

    Intervals have their place, but really the best thing you can do now is just spend time on the bike, or if not on the bike, anything with aerobic effort at relatively low intensities. Running is fine if that is what works for you. If your time is limited, intensity is okay, but you want to get to that weekend ride fresh and ready to go. If you feel like you're dragging yourself out there on the weekend, turn down the effort during the week.

    The other thing you need to figure out is eating and drinking. It's a big part of doing long rides without bonking. If you're eating and drinking right, you shouldn't be "totally spent and cramping" at the end of a training ride.

  3. #3
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    Did my first 60 miler several years ago and it ate my lunch. I couldn't figure it out. I was riding tons of miles, but it didn't transate. After really looking at things and reading a lot, I realized when I would train I just worried about miles and not the type of miles. The race had much more elevation gain than i was training so I was cooked 1/2 way through the race.
    Not sure where I'm going with this. Oh, train smart... or something.
    Small ring in front makes it easier. Small ring in back makes it harder. That blows my mind.

  4. #4
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    Pump the brakes on 8-10 hours on the bike a week. Not necessarily so.

    You're on the right track with upping the intensity on what you do have time for. Running is great. Don't give up the running in pursuit of 8-10 hours on the bike a week. You'll be short changing your heart and lungs. When you hit your weekend ride, go hard. A good, hard 25 miles for now. As time progresses, up the mileage to closer to 35 or 40 at as high and hard a pace as you can muster. Keep the running up in between.

    Now, be prepared to ride the 60 miler differently from your intense weekend rides. In the race, you are going to concentrate on letting the heart and lung fitness you have built up carry the day. Think about keeping a good spin instead of trying to muscle everything. Think about running at about 60% of the effort as on one of your intense 2 hour rides. Of course there is eating to consider, but that's its own post.

    My 2 cents. Others will cry foul. Admittedly, I don't win these things but I am usually in the top third of the field. Given family and work obligations this is how I run it.
    "Bikes aren't fast--people are fast. Bikes are overpriced. It's an important distinction."---BikeSnob NYC

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lenny7 View Post
    I realized when I would train I just worried about miles and not the type of miles. The race had much more elevation gain than i was training so I was cooked 1/2 way through the race.
    Not sure where I'm going with this. Oh, train smart... or something.
    This is why in my opinion it's best to train based on hours instead of miles. I can go ride 10miles of technical steep trail in 2hrs or I could go ride 30miles of flat trails in 2hrs. The technical trail will be the harder ride and better training for a race with steep terrain. Look at the finishing times from previous years and think about where you want to finish then try to build up your long rides to that time.

  6. #6
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    For me, training for next year's goals will be about heart rate and time. Never miles.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrantB View Post
    Pump the brakes on 8-10 hours on the bike a week. Not necessarily so.

    You're on the right track with upping the intensity on what you do have time for. Running is great. Don't give up the running in pursuit of 8-10 hours on the bike a week. You'll be short changing your heart and lungs. When you hit your weekend ride, go hard. A good, hard 25 miles for now. As time progresses, up the mileage to closer to 35 or 40 at as high and hard a pace as you can muster. Keep the running up in between.

    Now, be prepared to ride the 60 miler differently from your intense weekend rides. In the race, you are going to concentrate on letting the heart and lung fitness you have built up carry the day. Think about keeping a good spin instead of trying to muscle everything. Think about running at about 60% of the effort as on one of your intense 2 hour rides. Of course there is eating to consider, but that's its own post.

    My 2 cents. Others will cry foul. Admittedly, I don't win these things but I am usually in the top third of the field. Given family and work obligations this is how I run it.
    FWIW, I don' t think this is terrible advice, but it's not advice I would give somebody starting out. This can work, but you have to have a really good sense of where your personal limits are. You could very easily flame out if you don't know when to step back and take a rest week.

    Maybe it's just me, but I really think the hardest thing to learn is when to take a day off.

    And in my experience running seems to be 2x the training on a bike. (i.e. a 1 hour run is equivalent to a 2 hr bike ride. ) So if you've got limited time, running would provide more benefit.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbense View Post
    The way to get good at long rides is to do long rides... Realistically, if you want to be "halfway competitive" in an 60 mile race, you need to get to the point where you're consistently riding 8-10 hrs a week. But you can't just "jump into" that level of training,
    the slower you approach it, the easier it will be to stay there. Small incremental progress every week is the key.

    To "just finish" I would concentrate on that one long ride per week and try and increase it by 5-10% in time each week. It's that one long ride that is going to provide the major training benefit, the rest of your training is "training to train". i.e. working on improving your ability to recover to do the next long ride.

    Intervals have their place, but really the best thing you can do now is just spend time on the bike, or if not on the bike, anything with aerobic effort at relatively low intensities. Running is fine if that is what works for you. If your time is limited, intensity is okay, but you want to get to that weekend ride fresh and ready to go. If you feel like you're dragging yourself out there on the weekend, turn down the effort during the week.

    The other thing you need to figure out is eating and drinking. It's a big part of doing long rides without bonking. If you're eating and drinking right, you shouldn't be "totally spent and cramping" at the end of a training ride.
    I think part of the reason I cramp up and feel so exhausted is bc I haven't properly hydrated. I bought a gigerrig (like camelback just diff brand) very recently and will see how much that helps. I sweat like a mofo when I ride and it's very humid here.

    I picked up a trainer at the LBS last night and plan on putting some time in on it a few times a week.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lenny7 View Post
    Did my first 60 miler several years ago and it ate my lunch. I couldn't figure it out. I was riding tons of miles, but it didn't transate. After really looking at things and reading a lot, I realized when I would train I just worried about miles and not the type of miles. The race had much more elevation gain than i was training so I was cooked 1/2 way through the race.
    Not sure where I'm going with this. Oh, train smart... or something.
    Yeah I saw the 5900+ feet of gain and it worried me a little. I was thinking of running the hills in my neighborhood as part of my training. I ran yesterday, mixed hills and flats, did about 5.5 miles in 48 minutes.

    Quote Originally Posted by GrantB View Post
    Pump the brakes on 8-10 hours on the bike a week. Not necessarily so.

    You're on the right track with upping the intensity on what you do have time for. Running is great. Don't give up the running in pursuit of 8-10 hours on the bike a week. You'll be short changing your heart and lungs. When you hit your weekend ride, go hard. A good, hard 25 miles for now. As time progresses, up the mileage to closer to 35 or 40 at as high and hard a pace as you can muster. Keep the running up in between.

    Now, be prepared to ride the 60 miler differently from your intense weekend rides. In the race, you are going to concentrate on letting the heart and lung fitness you have built up carry the day. Think about keeping a good spin instead of trying to muscle everything. Think about running at about 60% of the effort as on one of your intense 2 hour rides. Of course there is eating to consider, but that's its own post.

    My 2 cents. Others will cry foul. Admittedly, I don't win these things but I am usually in the top third of the field. Given family and work obligations this is how I run it.

    I dig your recommendation. I enjoy running, and it's really easy to get out on the road in the neighborhood to put some miles in every night. Like I said it's about a 3.75 mile loop and there are a couple of really nice hills that I'd have to run up, down, then coming back I'd have to go back up and back down. I did about 5.5 miles last night and felt good. I could have gone further but it was cutting into family time. Total was about 48 minutes.

    Quote Originally Posted by bbense View Post
    FWIW, I don' t think this is terrible advice, but it's not advice I would give somebody starting out. This can work, but you have to have a really good sense of where your personal limits are. You could very easily flame out if you don't know when to step back and take a rest week.

    Maybe it's just me, but I really think the hardest thing to learn is when to take a day off.

    And in my experience running seems to be 2x the training on a bike. (i.e. a 1 hour run is equivalent to a 2 hr bike ride. ) So if you've got limited time, running would provide more benefit.
    Yes I agree about the 2x element of running vs biking. I am not training legs/cardio 7 days a week - probably about 5 days a week. 2 solid days of recovery and I feel great. I've read about tapering off a week or so before the race and will probably do that.

    Quote Originally Posted by dan4jeepin View Post
    This is why in my opinion it's best to train based on hours instead of miles. I can go ride 10miles of technical steep trail in 2hrs or I could go ride 30miles of flat trails in 2hrs. The technical trail will be the harder ride and better training for a race with steep terrain. Look at the finishing times from previous years and think about where you want to finish then try to build up your long rides to that time.
    The trails we ride that are close to my house have a great mix of elevation, technical stuff, rocks, fire roads with sustained climbs, etc. One full loop is about 25 miles. When I can do that loop twice in one day I bet I'll be feeling pretty confident!

    Quote Originally Posted by westin View Post
    For me, training for next year's goals will be about heart rate and time. Never miles.
    I need a heart rate monitor. Never used one other than the built in ones at the gym. When I do intervals on the trainer at the gym my heart rate will get up into the 170's during the hardest fastest sections but will quickly drop back the mid 130's once I dip into one of the easy sections. I'd be interested to see what my heartrate goes up to when I am actually riding and I hit the long sustained climbs on the jeep roads. I know I breath heavier and my legs burn more on those than when I'm on the trainer!

  9. #9
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    I'm jealous it sounds like there is awesome trail running and riding right near and conveniently located to your house!

    One thing I'd recommend which helped me when I got into racing- is it convenient for you to go check out the course say... a month before the race? I know actually getting to and doing the course itself REALLY helped with my nerves before a big race... like "wow, yeah... I can actually do this. Alright. Bring it on."

    Then again when you're elbow to elbow with everyone else in the actual race, it's a different story, however knowing that you can actually get through the whole course and having some familiarity with it is reassuring.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beandip4all View Post
    I'm jealous it sounds like there is awesome trail running and riding right near and conveniently located to your house!

    One thing I'd recommend which helped me when I got into racing- is it convenient for you to go check out the course say... a month before the race? I know actually getting to and doing the course itself REALLY helped with my nerves before a big race... like "wow, yeah... I can actually do this. Alright. Bring it on."

    Then again when you're elbow to elbow with everyone else in the actual race, it's a different story, however knowing that you can actually get through the whole course and having some familiarity with it is reassuring.
    I can check out the course before the race. It is probably an hour drive away. That's a good tip. Last year I believe only 60 people signed up to race so unless a whole lot more sign up this year, it shouldn't be tooooo heavy of traffic on raceday. Who knows, tho!

    I think the fastest times last year were about 4 hours and some change. This year they actually have a 60 and 100 mile option.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachua View Post
    I can check out the course before the race. It is probably an hour drive away. That's a good tip. Last year I believe only 60 people signed up to race so unless a whole lot more sign up this year, it shouldn't be tooooo heavy of traffic on raceday. Who knows, tho!

    I think the fastest times last year were about 4 hours and some change. This year they actually have a 60 and 100 mile option.
    That's cool... an hour from the house is pretty convenient then for you to do a scouting mission. Sounds like a good race- next year you should do the 100 miles

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbense View Post

    Maybe it's just me, but I really think the hardest thing to learn is when to take a day off.

    And in my experience running seems to be 2x the training on a bike. (i.e. a 1 hour run is equivalent to a 2 hr bike ride. ) So if you've got limited time, running would provide more benefit.
    I agree to both points. You can't be super intense every day of the week.
    "Bikes aren't fast--people are fast. Bikes are overpriced. It's an important distinction."---BikeSnob NYC

  13. #13
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    I have found using an elliptical ,with handles to use upper body and enough resistance is a great low impact cardio workout. It gets your back, shoulders and arms ready for the long days on the bike too.

    Can you night ride where you are at? That's how get the miles in when the days get shorter.

  14. #14
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    unfortunately I can't ride at night. . I did find out that they keep the gates open till 7pm two nights per week during winter but I don't even get home from work till 6pm (if I'm lucky).

    my plan right now is to do 30 miles per weekend ride till i break through that ceiling. ill try for more on weekends I can ride both days. secondary training will be to ride the trainer 2 nights a week and run twice a week (interchangeable with trainer).

    I also found out that there's 3k feet of elev gain on the 25 mile loop near where I live so it looks like that will be a perfect training ground for me!


    this weekend I'm going to go for 30 miles in one ride. that will be a new milestone for me. .

  15. #15
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    so not sure if this is cool with admins but I thought about adding what I did each training session. (if not I can delete or follow your suggestion)

    tonight I rode the gym bike for 45 minutes doing intervals. the max resistance is 25 and I set it to an average of 17. my heart rate got up to 170 a few times but mostly hovered in the high 150 low 160 range. not sure how accurate those hrm through the grips are.

    feel great tonight. legs feel a little tired maybe a tad achy but otherwise all good. going to run tomorrow night and rest Friday night before I shoot for 30 miles of riding on Saturday.

  16. #16
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    I would guess most of the halfway competitive ( ie middle of the pack) racers in a sixty-miler ride a minimum of 5 and more like 6 to 10 hours a week. My first 50 mile race is this weekend and I have about 2000 road bike miles and 500 trail bike miles and 700 running miles so far this year. Like you I enjoy running hills, and my weekly schedule looks similar to this :

    Monday Yoga or Strength plus Swim (rest legs)
    Tuesday 5 mile run
    Wednesday 45-75 minutes hilly ride outside or trainer intervals
    Thursday 5 mile run
    Friday Make up day, or rest legs plus swim
    Saturday Big trail ride 3 hours increasing to 5 hours
    Sunday Recovery spin, easy two hours on trainer or long slow 60-90 minute run.

    If you can work in an early morning spin class, that will help a lot. Also, take advantage of holidays and a few strategically planned vacation days to schedule some "breakthrough" trail rides....


    ... Is what I think.

  17. #17
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    I have a certain "very tough" 50 miler that I have done for the last 4 years. This year I knocked 1hr 3min off of my previous best time and that was while also running a fever for most of the race!



    It was actually a culmination of factors that helped me achieve that jump. Factor #1 was consistency in riding. Last winter I began commuting back/forth to work. It's 1hr each direction. My schedule is such that I work 3 days one week and 4 days the following week. My schedule rotates like that all year long. That equals 6hrs/8hrs weekly. All of that is done on the road "on my SS MTB". Ninety % of this was done at an intensity where I was just "having" to lightly breathe out of my mouth. At that intensity I can build some fatigue but not so much that it leaves me tired for days at a time. Once every 3 weeks I would try and get in a "very relaxed" paced trail ride of around 5hrs. As it got closer to the date of the race I would pick up the intensity on every other hill or so. Just played around with the intensity on certain sections of those longer rides. My purpose was to slowly add intensity to get a training effect but not so much that it was hard to recover from. Baby steps if you will? If you are not used to riding that long at once, just being on a bike period for 5 or so hours will be fatiguing regardless of the intensity. It's pretty unrealistic to expect to be strong for 60 miles if you only train for half that distance all of the time.

    In the past I have ALWAYS suffered from major leg cramps no matter how much I ate/drank and it didn't seem to matter "what" I ate or drank. I tried Sport Legs, Endurolytes, Heed and a whole host of other supplements. Nothing worked. This year however I did not even have the first twinge/sign of a leg cramp!!!! Cannot begin to tell you how awesome that has been! I can't point to any 1 thing but I do know that my training/riding has been consistent and I have cut my caffeine consumption by more than half. I used to drink coffee all day long at work. Now I just have 2 cups before I leave for work and if I have coffee during the day it is decaf.

    Fueling on the bike. This has been a progressive learning experience for me but it has made a HUGE difference in how well I feel throughout a long race. If you can go for those longer rides be sure to experiment with different drinks and whatever you choose to eat so that you will know how your body will react. For me I've narrowed it down to Shot Blox, water and Infinite Nutrition's endurance mix. I eat 1 pack of Shot Blox per hour. I can actually "feel" the kick that I get from them especially once my body is starting to feel fatigued. I mix "1" bottle of Infinite to last me the entire race. I estimate how many hours I expect it to take me to finish. If its 6hrs then I put 6 servings in that 1 bottle. Each hour I try and drink about 1/6th of that bottle. Yes that is super concentrated and YES it tastes about like battery acid but it saves me a lot of time and keeps things simple. The rest of the time I am just drinking plain water.

    Next year I plan to take another hour off of my time. I'm gonna do it by losing 15-20 pounds over the winter and focusing more of my training on the weaker points in my game. If I can do that I should be getting really close to a top 5 finish in my class which is something that just a couple of years ago I thought was pretty much unattainable!
    Last edited by Flat Ark; 11-03-2012 at 07:14 AM.

  18. #18
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    Hey thanks for passing along the wisdom!

    I will try out a bunch of that. Today I rode about 34 miles. most of it was single track but we did climb one long jeep trail, and two long fire roads. I stayed hydrated and didn't have any cramps! I also still have lots of energy - just got back to the house and still wearing my bike gear lol.

    Today was def an accomplishment for me! Now if I can continue to build on that!

  19. #19
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    I have also just commited myself to a longish event and am beginning my training (i'm a 18 month mtb noob). I only want to finish. But, with cutoff times, you have to keep up the pace. This course is 44mi and 8000ft of climbing. Worst part is that about 6500 of that elevation is in ~21mi broken up on 2 climbs (9mi and 12mi). I can't take the advice to reserve legs by spinning because i'm doing this SS. I also can't run because of a disc bulge. Luckily, this course is also just about an hour away from my house.

    Here's my plan (hope it works)-

    *Ride the entire course. Knowing what to expect while allow you do know where to conserve energy and where to let loose. Get familiar with the terrain.
    *I plan on riding the one of the sustained climbs every 2 weeks. This will get my used to the course and where i can conserve energy. I will also get used to 20mi with 4000-4500ft.
    *Get in a 2nd local ride for miles and shorter climbs, but, steep enough to require leg power/endurance.
    *Add a recovery spin day on the trainer to practice pedal stroke. (Again, i'm a noob)
    *Test out food to last the ride. It is a race, so, i don't want to sit and have a picnic. But, this effort will require fuel. I don't want to only bike with gels. I am going to try out a lot of ideas i have read here at MTBR (potatos, rice balls, pickle juice). I want to make sure i have my goodies ready and know i can ride while eating them.
    *Do NOT test out equipment or foods on race day. Last thing i want is an upset stomach 15mi in. Or, tires that will shred on the terrain. This has already been eye opening. I've already figured out my brakes fade on the downhill, water bottle cage is too weak to hold my bottle over the rough terrain, and boiled potatos are easy on the stomach.
    *Hydrate. I hate dehydration headaches and my muscles take forever to recover if i don't. I try to hydrate 2-3days before a big ride. You want to store that up and the day of will mostly just pass through.
    *Enjoy the training. Each training ride is an excuse to get on the bike.

    Hope all goes well and good luck to you.

  20. #20
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    Hey man thanks for the tips! I really appreciate everyone giving their input and experience!

    The race you're entering sounds hardcore! and on a ss to boot! I would love to do something like that someday.

    I wanted to give a quick update to training. I took off Sunday to rest. legs were a little sore. soreness gone today so I ran 4 miles of hills. felt great and shattered my previous best average pace by almost 1 minute. I also looked back at my running log and saw that I've shaved almost 2 minutes off my average pace since June! most of that progress has been in the last 2 months since I started back mountain biking!

    more good news, too - my blood pressure has dropped from 130/80 to 112/70!

    the human body is amazing in its adaptability!

  21. #21
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    I'd recommend giving these a good read.

    Methods of Endurance Training: Summing Up Part 1 | BodyRecomposition - The Home of Lyle McDonald

    There is a long series of article of which this is the first part of the overall summary. The author agrees with the 2:1 bike:run approximation. He also discusses how you can use more intense methods (not necessarily short-burst intervals, but things like higher intensity sessions of 15 minutes to 1-2 hours) to supplement, complement, or (if necessary due to family, work, etc.) "replace" traditional logging of long hours in the saddle. Note, I use replace in quotes because at the elite levels, you have to log the long hours in the saddle (as well as using more intense methods).

    He does not really discuss how to use cross-training in event preparation. I'd love pointers to resources that do that.

    It may give you some thoughts. Also, you might think in terms of logging your efforts as heart rate over a given time (which I noticed in at least one post). This will help control for variations in terrain, etc. Remember that you are a biker who uses running as a supplement. I would consider phasing the running out as you approach your event.

    I'm looking to do similar long events next year (for the first time) -- so I'm interested in the same sorts of things, but my advice comes with serious grains of salt and there are more experienced folks around here.

    Best,
    Mark

  22. #22
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    Last Fall I started riding with a group of guys and the goal was to race Syllamo's Revenge in Arkansas in May of this year. It's a tough 50 mile endurance race and my first long race. We rode as much as possible throughout the winter which was unusually mild last year so we got in some good training.

    Out of all of our training days up to the race we had one very hot day on a ride and it kicked our butts because we were not heat acclimated yet. It was an eye opener.

    Well the day of the race was also hot and it was a tough day of riding for me. I did finish, which wasn't pretty, but still glad the fact that I finished. I have never been so wore out in my life due to the miles and the heat. Not sure where you live but be ready for anything the day of the race. Learn how to stay hydrated and fueled for the miles and how to pace yourself over that many miles.

  23. #23
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    Hey Gary, the weather can have a huge effect on the body! It gets hot as heck here in the Southeast during the summer so I hope my body adapts quickly. The 60 miler is in May and it will probably be quite warm with plenty of humidity! Hydration will def be key. Thanks for the heads up/tips!

    Also, wanted to add an update. I've been riding intervals on the trainer 4-5 nights a week and doing one good long ride every weekend. Last weekend I felt the fastest I've ever felt on my bike. Bike handling skills and confidence are improving every weekend and my endurance and hill climbing is improving, too.

    New first for me last weekend - was able to keep it in the middle chain ring on all hills. One climb is about 2.4 miles long, so I was super stoked about that one. I used to have to drop down into the small ring during the steepest sections.



    I've also got a new bike being built! I can't wait to finish it.

  24. #24
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    I would avoid making your training a religion unless you are being paid Avoid too many long,slow miles instead find some steep hills and areas where you can crank out some hard miles. I would give yourself 2-3 days off. Have fun while training. This is all about fun for us mortals who don't get paid.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zachua View Post
    unfortunately I can't ride at night. . I did find out that they keep the gates open till 7pm two nights per week during winter but I don't even get home from work till 6pm (if I'm lucky).

    my plan right now is to do 30 miles per weekend ride till i break through that ceiling. ill try for more on weekends I can ride both days. secondary training will be to ride the trainer 2 nights a week and run twice a week (interchangeable with trainer).

    I also found out that there's 3k feet of elev gain on the 25 mile loop near where I live so it looks like that will be a perfect training ground for me!


    this weekend I'm going to go for 30 miles in one ride. that will be a new milestone for me. .
    I cannot ride the trails at night is what you are saying. I ride the roads and gravel a lot during the winter months. I have good lights but don't need a trail to ride. The road riding on your mountain bike will pay off big time. In ride about 13 to 15 hours per week and lately about 9 to 10 of those aren't on the trail. I do get to dirt on Sundays. Just ride your bike and seek out some nice hilly areas. I look for hills. Hope this helps.

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