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  1. #1
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    4hour MTB race - help in race day prep

    I have a 4 hr MTB race coming up, Need suggestions in....
    Set up- What to bring and bike set up... pics great
    Looking for a list of bullet pts of helpful hints on ...
    -tools/equipment to bring
    -H2O and/or additives
    -food, best stuff to bring and cool ways to pack for easy access and consumption
    -heplful strategies to consider during race
    -pics of bike and equipment/food setup
    -best pedal cadence
    -heart rate monitors... yes or no and why? (goal HR for race if yes)
    -websites for training programs ad/or info on above questions

  2. #2
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    More details. When is "coming up"? Have you done 2-4 hour events before? What type of course is it? Singletrack...forest service?

    Answered the nutrition question in your other thread.

  3. #3
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    Few weeks...
    First 4 hr MTB trail race- (appx 10mi loop x as many times you can complete in 4 hrs)
    I have done plenty of distance racing in triathlons (road and xtrerra) but never 4 hrs on a MTB

  4. #4
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    Ah, hour loop makes planning much easier. I still usually carry the normal tube, multi-tool, co2 package. I have a spare hanger in the bag as well. I like my nutrition in bottles for hour loops because I can switch it out every lap. In warmer conditions ill carry two. If you are in to race make sure you get to the singletrack near the front of the pack. It's 10x worse than coming out of an xterra swim and getting into the trail (if you are a slow swimmer like me). I know it's called a four hour race, but there is a chance you won't race for four hours. Finish four laps in 3:30 and you are done, three laps in 3:15....done, etc. I won't go back out if I couldn't finish another lap. That being said, four hours on the bike is the distance where I feel like I can go pretty hard the entire time. For me, that's slightly less than Olympic distance bike effort.

    I don't pay any attention to cadence because it is virtually impossible to maintain a consistent cadence on the terrain around here....way too much shifting. I don't use HR either, but if that is what you use I would shoot for somewhere between Olympic and 70.3 effort depending on where your fitness is.

    If it's a few weeks out I don't think any training programs are going to do much good. Ride as much as you can between now and then. Take a few days easy before the event.

    The biggest difference for me between long course road triathlon and longer mountain bike races is that my stomach is more sensitive on the mountain bike. I use the KISS method and that has been working quite well.

  5. #5
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    This was a recommendation that I received for a 100 miler a few years back.

    Bike recommendation for most endurance mtb racing is a lightweight (but reliable) full suspension bike, or a hardtail 29er. Reliability is very important. Make sure the bike has been checked over thoroughly before the race. I recommend doing this 2 weeks before race day, so that any new parts that might be needed can be installed, adjusted, and tested with at least 2 rides before the race.
    For tires in regular conditions I recommend something fast rolling with durable sidewalls that are resistant to cuts and pinches. I strongly recommend tubeless tires with sealant. Tires in the 600-700g weight range are generally reliable and still reasonable weight. Tire pressures depend on body weight, riding style, specific tire and riding conditions. That said, I usually run my 2.2 tubeless tires at 30-32psi for my 200lb bodyweight.

    I recommend you carry the following supplies with you during the race:

    2 spare tubes. If you use one, ask for a replacement at an aid station, if these are available.I also like to carry a tire boot.
    2 CO2 canisters and one adapter. Know how to use them and practice beforehand if necessary.
    One mini pump. Use this if you are out of CO2.
    2 tire levers. Wrap about 18 inches of duct tape around one of them. You never know when that might come in useful, and around the tire lever is a good place to keep it.
    One multi tool. This should include at least the 4, 5, 6mm hex wrenches and a flat head screwdriver.
    One chain tool. Attach a SRAM quick link to the chain tool with a strong twisty tie or tape. Use the quick link if you ever need to put a chain back together.

    You can carry these items in a hydration pack or in your pockets (or split them up between the two to distribute the weight). Make sure the spare tubes are separated from anything sharp such as the multi tool or chain tool. Be wary of saddle packs. They often lead to holes in tubes from all the jostling.

  6. #6
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    Thank you very much for all your detail thedood and nov0798! Great nuggets! Effort level similar to olympic and 70.3 is very helpful. I was thinking as much but wasn't sure. I do have a full susp., very light 29er, tubless. Thx again !

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