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  1. #1
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    2018 Cascade Creampuff

    I'll be the nutcase on the steel-frame, single-speed 29+ hardtail with *flats* cause my feet don't like clipless. It's gonna be so much fun!

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    This race is always a blast. I'm taking a year off the racing stuff, but hope to be down there to ride before and after, and help out during the event.
    Whining is not a strategy.

  3. #3
    eri
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    This race is always a blast. I'm taking a year off the racing stuff, but hope to be down there to ride before and after, and help out during the event.
    I had a really good time doing the 50 last year. Lovely, lovely course, gorgeous forest, was pleasant despite the heat last year.

    Course was perfect for singlespeed. Spun out at the start means I got to say 'hi' to new people all day long.

    Am kinda sorta thinking to buck up and try the 100 this year. I'm just aiming to finish and this is the ride I am most looking forward to, just gotta beat the cutoffs.

    Looks like date has been set for August 14th 2018. <--- Edit: NOOO! Wrong, is the 4th of august as corrected below.

    I'm Psyched!
    Last edited by eri; 02-05-2018 at 11:36 PM.
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    I agree, it is a great course for SS and the race was a lot of fun. It's too bad they shifted the date back a week compared to last year. I probably can't make it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eri View Post
    Course was perfect for singlespeed. Spun out at the start means I got to say 'hi' to new people all day long.
    Yep, that paved flat 3 mile start is the only part that blows on single speed. In 2010 when there were over 150 riders a single speeder came in 2nd overall.

    Quote Originally Posted by eri View Post
    Looks like date has been set for August 14th 2018.
    It's August 4th, 2018 - first Saturday in August.

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    eri
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleIPA View Post
    Yep, that paved flat 3 mile start is the only part that blows on single speed. In 2010 when there were over 150 riders a single speeder came in 2nd overall.



    It's August 4th, 2018 - first Saturday in August.

    Thanks for pointing that out! Jesse how unhelpful I am. I don't understand how I could have misread that date. I'm editing my post above to point that the date is wrong.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleIPA View Post
    Yep, that paved flat 3 mile start is the only part that blows on single speed. In 2010 when there were over 150 riders a single speeder came in 2nd overall.



    It's August 4th, 2018 - first Saturday in August.
    Nice! Now I might be able to suffer for 100 miles again.

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    Tires question. Should I pick up some Fat B Nimbles? I remember seeing lots of Racing Ralphs, I'm thinking that 29+ Fat B Nimbles are pretty close to giant, heavy(ish) Ralphs. I really can't see any other 29+ tire that makes sense for the Puff, if single speed 29+ makes any sense at all anyway.

  9. #9
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    Kosmo can probably give some good race tire suggestions as I know he's rather savvy in the race scene.

    I ran Ikons in last year's hot and dry Creampuff. But really, I run Ikons in pretty much everything except mud. And if there's mud I typically stay home and drink beer.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleIPA View Post
    Tires question. Should I pick up some Fat B Nimbles? I remember seeing lots of Racing Ralphs, I'm thinking that 29+ Fat B Nimbles are pretty close to giant, heavy(ish) Ralphs. I really can't see any other 29+ tire that makes sense for the Puff, if single speed 29+ makes any sense at all anyway.
    I've had great luck with XR3 front and XR1 rear, as well as RoRo front and RaRa rear combos.

    I went RaRa at both ends one year, and definitely had to hold back a tiny bit on the Alpine Trail descent, esp the Jedi Section.

    I am now in agreement with econo on mud events. The last Creampuff 100 I did was the infamous Mud Puff, and I will never race a bike in bad mud again after that.
    Whining is not a strategy.

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    I can't wait to hear 2012 mud puff stories first hand after the race. Hoping we don't have new mud puff stories to tell.

    Thanks for all of the tire suggestions. I'm thinking I'm going to try running Chupacabras. They are more or less a giant XR2 which seems *close* an XR1 or XR3. I know 850g tires seem nutz for a Puff, but I ran 850g(ish) 2.4 Ardents in 2010 and finished. I was really looking at the Fat B Nimbles, but there are too many stories of them falling apart just looking at them sideways.

  12. #12
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    Not that much punchy, repeated acceleration type of climbing, so it's as much or more about rolling resistance than weight, esp out back IMO.
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  13. #13
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    Ninety per cent of your time will be spent on the gravel climb the three times you suffer through it, so pick the tires appropriate for that.

    It has been a long time since I've ridden the course and the current crop of tires aren't the same at all, but assuming it's going to be dry (and Western Oregon usually is in August) pick a tire that rolls fast as your main priority. Traction just won't be a problem.
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by miles View Post
    Ninety per cent of your time will be spent on the gravel climb the three times you suffer through it, so pick the tires appropriate for that.

    It has been a long time since I've ridden the course and the current crop of tires aren't the same at all, but assuming it's going to be dry (and Western Oregon usually is in August) pick a tire that rolls fast as your main priority. Traction just won't be a problem.
    Course has changed a bit from the three lap "classic" version you're describing miles, but your tire advice still holds, IMO, esp in back. Personally, I like a bit more bite up front, so I can Bring The Thunder coming down Alpine and Tire Mountain. Ha!
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    Course has changed a bit from the three lap "classic" version you're describing miles, but your tire advice still holds, IMO, esp in back. Personally, I like a bit more bite up front, so I can Bring The Thunder coming down Alpine and Tire Mountain. Ha!
    I used 2.35 ikon last year. There were some loose switchbacks where I had trouble with front end traction. Looking for something bigger this year on the front. Ikons sure have been reliable and durable for me..
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    This race is always a blast. I'm taking a year off the racing stuff, but hope to be down there to ride before and after, and help out during the event.
    Giving others a chance for some wins 'eh? Only to return and crush their souls in '19.
    If it's not powered solely by you, it's motorized.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ACree View Post
    Giving others a chance for some wins 'eh? Only to return and crush their souls in '19.
    Exactly.

    Hoping to win the inaugural 60+ E-Bike Category!
    Whining is not a strategy.

  18. #18
    jms
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    I've had great luck with XR3 front and XR1 rear, as well as RoRo front and RaRa rear combos.

    I went RaRa at both ends one year, and definitely had to hold back a tiny bit on the Alpine Trail descent, esp the Jedi Section.

    I am now in agreement with econo on mud events. The last Creampuff 100 I did was the infamous Mud Puff, and I will never race a bike in bad mud again after that.
    Oh good time indeed ; )
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  19. #19
    jms
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    Course has changed a bit from the three lap "classic" version you're describing miles, but your tire advice still holds, IMO, esp in back. Personally, I like a bit more bite up front, so I can Bring The Thunder coming down Alpine and Tire Mountain. Ha!
    Best advice you're going to find regarding this race will be found from Kosmo IMHO

    Rolling resistance definitely make a difference in this race. You might look at a 2.25 snakskin version Thunderburt [rear]/2.25 Nobby Nic [front] combination if it's a "dry" and something like Nobby Nic/Rocket Ron [rear] if it's a "wet" year for the course they're using these days - there's over 20K of climbing for the hundred miler.
    Last edited by jms; 02-26-2018 at 08:17 PM.
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by jms View Post
    Best advice you're going to find regarding this race will be found from Kosmo IMHO

    Rolling resistance definitely make a difference in this race. You might look at a 2.25 snakskin version Thunderburt [rear]/2.25 Nobby Nic [front] combination if it's a "dry" and something like Nobby Nic/Rocket Ron [rear] if it's a "wet" year for the course they're using these days - there's over 20K of climbing for the hundred miler.
    20k climbing in 100 miles? No. I need to see a legit usfs file one that. My friends have done it and their strava showed around 14k. Which may be a little under the actuall usfs geological survey but not 6k under.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LaneDetroitCity View Post
    20k climbing in 100 miles? No. I need to see a legit usfs file one that. My friends have done it and their strava showed around 14k. Which may be a little under the actuall usfs geological survey but not 6k under.

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    It's more like 16k. At least that's what my GPS uploaded to Strava and others that showed up on my activity had between 15k and 17k feet of climbing as well.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by economatic View Post
    It's more like 16k. At least that's what my GPS uploaded to Strava and others that showed up on my activity had between 15k and 17k feet of climbing as well.
    I show 8400 feet for 1 lap of the course. Fritters are more appealing than Creampuffs.
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  23. #23
    LDC is ded,deth by trollz
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    16 sounds legit. Brutal as well. My friend just barely made the cutoffs at each point. Im going to have to check this one out at some point.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LaneDetroitCity View Post
    16 sounds legit. Brutal as well. My friend just barely made the cutoffs at each point. Im going to have to check this one out at some point.

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    16-17 is correct on the current course. The only part I considered somewhat brutal was that mile-ish gravel road climb after the last aid station. Just a bit too steep for me and my gears that day. Racing. AAAARRRRGGGGHHHH!

    My biggest 100 ever is still my first Butte 100 on the original course that was well over 18k climbing and darn near killed me.
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  25. #25
    eri
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaneDetroitCity View Post
    20k climbing in 100 miles? No. I need to see a legit usfs file one that. My friends have done it and their strava showed around 14k. Which may be a little under the actuall usfs geological survey but not 6k under.

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    I clicked around on "flybys" for last years fritter 50. Looks like lots of people showed >9500ft for the 50.

    https://labs.strava.com/flyby/viewer...-0QndX1EKrEs1C

    But altitude truth is sort of like measuring the length of a coastline - depends on how fine your ruler is.
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by eri View Post
    I clicked around on "flybys" for last years fritter 50. Looks like lots of people showed >9500ft for the 50.

    https://labs.strava.com/flyby/viewer...-0QndX1EKrEs1C

    But altitude truth is sort of like measuring the length of a coastline - depends on how fine your ruler is.
    Good point. And there are always variances, sometimes quite large ones, across everyone's barometric altimeter sensors. Sensors always have measurement error.

    The elevation change is only one metric for course difficulty. The Creampuff gives you long steady gravel roads to grind away and fuel/hydrate while ticking away the miles & feet. Many other courses don't give you that luxury. It also makes things easier with the course at lower elevation compared to other races, e.g. Butte 100, Pierre's Hole.

  27. #27
    eri
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    Quote Originally Posted by economatic View Post
    Good point. And there are always variances, sometimes quite large ones, across everyone's barometric altimeter sensors. Sensors always have measurement error.

    The elevation change is only one metric for course difficulty. The Creampuff gives you long steady gravel roads to grind away and fuel/hydrate while ticking away the miles & feet. Many other courses don't give you that luxury. It also makes things easier with the course at lower elevation compared to other races, e.g. Butte 100, Pierre's Hole.
    Even with the heat last year I thought the fritter was fun and not so difficult. Great aid stations and the forest and trails were just so great, that alone took away a bunch of difficulty.

    The original suntop 50 course is much rougher and exposed to the sun, the roads were steeper, fewer aid stations, fewer views. Much more of an ass kicker. But then that whole race was just a 50...

    https://labs.strava.com/flyby/viewer...WSay7Fgmm3qHJg

    Oh jeese. Now I see that many peoples strava report the original suntop 50 is 11-12k of climbing. Well... I guess another example to prove your point: the difficulty difference was more than just 2k more climbing.
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  28. #28
    jms
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    16-17 is correct on the current course. The only part I considered somewhat brutal was that mile-ish gravel road climb after the last aid station. Just a bit too steep for me and my gears that day. Racing. AAAARRRRGGGGHHHH!

    My biggest 100 ever is still my first Butte 100 on the original course that was well over 18k climbing and darn near killed me.
    Ahh the yes, the access to Cloverpatch Tie. Ugly

    I started and finished six CCP's consecutively, beginning in 2007 - the year Kosmo showed up and came within minutes of taking the OA [chapeau Tom]. IRC The classic course was [traditionally] touted as 18K and change [four times]. The two versions I did that routed through the Winberries [the 2012 Mud Puff being one] were "only" @ 13-14k.

    From the horse's mouth, he'd originally estimated it to be over 20k. I'm glad to read Derek dialed back the climbing to something a tad less miserable on the latest version.

    Never had my best placings there, but ALWAYS my favorite race. The people and place make the CCP iconic.
    Last edited by jms; 02-28-2018 at 08:24 AM.
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    I did another west coast endurance MTB race a couple of years ago and when I was descending fast on pavement I thought to myself "why am I wasting my precious climbing energy to go downhill on pavement, I should just do the CCP again"

    Thanks for tire info everyone (Kosmo).

    As it's been a few years (2010) a couple more equipmentish questions.

    1. Does everyone run a dropper post now? Other than the weight it just makes sense I think.
    2. Maybe this is more strategy than equipment, pump up tires for the 1912 big climb and then to drop them before dropping into Alpine, pump them up again at Aid #1? Or just pick a happy medium and try to make it work all day?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleIPA View Post
    I did another west coast endurance MTB race a couple of years ago and when I was descending fast on pavement I thought to myself "why am I wasting my precious climbing energy to go downhill on pavement, I should just do the CCP again"

    Thanks for tire info everyone (Kosmo).

    As it's been a few years (2010) a couple more equipmentish questions.

    1. Does everyone run a dropper post now? Other than the weight it just makes sense I think.
    2. Maybe this is more strategy than equipment, pump up tires for the 1912 big climb and then to drop them before dropping into Alpine, pump them up again at Aid #1? Or just pick a happy medium and try to make it work all day?
    1. Well, not me. Ever. Anywhere. TIFWIW.

    2. Happy medium, IMO. I run a couple psi more than I would for a long, non-racing, trail ride.
    Whining is not a strategy.

  31. #31
    jms
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    1. Well, not me. Ever. Anywhere. TIFWIW.

    2. Happy medium, IMO. I run a couple psi more than I would for a long, non-racing, trail ride.
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  32. #32
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    Thanks again for info on tires, droppers and tire pressure.

    Now on to training.

    Today's ride: https://www.strava.com/activities/1471882164

    Best things about this ride are.
    1. It's all on the bike from my garage to the top of the mountain.
    2. I'm riding on dirt (roads not trails) in about 1 mile from home, mostly dirt rest of ride.
    3. Lots of 6-8% climbing, just like the Cream Puff.

    Am I wasting my precious training time on the flat sections with a few punchy climbs? I could just drive to the base of the big climb and do laps.

    Also, the steep "nipple" on top of the mountain really wipes me out sometimes. It's only about 70-100 feet of climbing but it's really steep. Part of me thinks I'm toughening myself up getting to the top, another part of me thinks I'm beating myself up getting to the top.

    Just wondering how some of you who have completed a bunch of Puffs would make use of this "training hill".

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleIPA View Post
    Thanks again for info on tires, droppers and tire pressure.

    Now on to training.

    Today's ride: https://www.strava.com/activities/1471882164

    Best things about this ride are.
    1. It's all on the bike from my garage to the top of the mountain.
    2. I'm riding on dirt (roads not trails) in about 1 mile from home, mostly dirt rest of ride.
    3. Lots of 6-8% climbing, just like the Cream Puff.

    Am I wasting my precious training time on the flat sections with a few punchy climbs? I could just drive to the base of the big climb and do laps.

    Also, the steep "nipple" on top of the mountain really wipes me out sometimes. It's only about 70-100 feet of climbing but it's really steep. Part of me thinks I'm toughening myself up getting to the top, another part of me thinks I'm beating myself up getting to the top.

    Just wondering how some of you who have completed a bunch of Puffs would make use of this "training hill".
    Well, there is always some value to punchy, rolling training, but honestly, you can describe the Puff with 90% accuracy by saying "climb moderately steep gravel roads, then rip down single track". But the North Fork Trail segment is kind of rolly so don't completely neglect this aspect of training.

    Do NOT neglect that nipple on your home training climbs. The short (~1 mile?) gravel climb to the Cloverpatch Tie Trail late-ish in the lap is very steep, and catches the sun's heat nicely.
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    Thanks again for the advice Kosmo. I'll remind my legs that they will thank me when we get to that steep bit.

  35. #35
    jms
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    Never say never

    After the legendary/infamous Mudpuff of 2012, I thought,"I'm good, six starts and finishes is plenty, seen em all, done enough, seven times isn't going to be any more 'fun'. Time to put myself out to pasture."

    And for some reason, i'm still captivated by this silly race that is The Cascade Creampuff. So, I'm in for my 6-1/2th [50] or seventh [100], whichever makes [likely the LEAST] sense by June of this year. My goal being to just finish, and maybe set a benchmark for stupidity beyond the age of 60 .

    Let the training [follies] begin.
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    ^^^ Funny. I thought the same after the Mud Puff, but went back two years ago and did the 50. Had a blast. Eugene and Michelle put on a good race and after-party. I might go down and help out this year, and give the 50 another whirl next year, which will be my 60th year on this planet.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleIPA View Post
    I did another west coast endurance MTB race a couple of years ago and when I was descending fast on pavement I thought to myself "why am I wasting my precious climbing energy to go downhill on pavement, I should just do the CCP again"

    Thanks for tire info everyone (Kosmo).

    As it's been a few years (2010) a couple more equipmentish questions.

    1. Does everyone run a dropper post now? Other than the weight it just makes sense I think.
    2. Maybe this is more strategy than equipment, pump up tires for the 1912 big climb and then to drop them before dropping into Alpine, pump them up again at Aid #1? Or just pick a happy medium and try to make it work all day?
    I ran a dropper post last year in the Fritter on my SS steel hardtail, and didn't regret it a bit - I think I had a lot more fun, and had better recovery on the descents. That recovery would be even more important in the 100. But I run a dropper most of the time, so I'm not as used to having a rigid post - and fun is more important than speed for me.

    I just ran a medium-ish tire pressure as I'd prefer not to adjust it on the trail. Traction was an issue on the road climb after Cloverpatch though. If I had to do it again then I might let some pressure out at aid 4 so I could avoid walking there - I had to walk sections unless I could find grassy terrain to pedal on because the gravel was too loose to stand and too steep to pedal seated.

  38. #38
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    Anyone want to ride ATCA (no shuttle but not hammering), Sunday July 1st or Monday 2nd?

    Training/scouting mission. *Only* one loop :-)

  39. #39
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    This race is so legit. Toughest single-day 100 miler IMO. I've done Leadville, High Cascades and Capitol Forest and a lot of other ultra endurance events. It's hard because of the amount of climbing per lap.

    Last year I came in 2nd in the Open category, racing a 19lb hardtail. Nothing too special with setup other than running two bottles and eating tons of watermelon and refilling at each station. The key is to pace yourself properly! I ride this race.

    I trained well by doing tons of steady climbing, commuting weekdays with a pretty full backpack. That really got my legs in order and made for some efficient power output (sans backpack). Prior to the race I had done at least 5 or so 60 mile races.

    The trails are great. Aside from the monster fire road climbing be sure to go right, not left towards the top. I've made the mistake last year and lost 30 minutes chasing back. The year before I missed a different turn. Argh! I highly suggest going over the course thoroughly and understand where the potential splits are. The organizers don't do a good job of simplifying directions. I remember attending the pre-race meeting the day before and getting confused 20 minutes into the course description! I talked to them about making sure course markings are more visible.

    Other than that it's a challenging race. Wish it had more attendance, but I think the amount of climbing really scare people off.

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    ^ ^ ^ ^ ^

    https://www.strava.com/activities/1119285548 - Your strava from last year almost scared me away from signing up. I found it googling "cascade creampuff site:strava.com". I saw 20k climbing and thought that was more even more than expected, then I saw your navigational error and extra 1000+ feet or so of climbing. Nice job btw! A podium with no mistakes is impressive, but you added even *more* climbing and still got #2!

  41. #41
    eri
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    WRT course markings, they use green for go, red for wrong, but Im color blind so look exactly the same. I had to stop 3 times and hold the tape to my eye and was able to determine it was red. They said theyd pick different system next year that didnt rely on color.

    And... Ill be missing the race this year... was really looking forward to it... traveling overseas with my son. Priorities.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrioabero View Post
    This race is so legit. Toughest single-day 100 miler IMO. I've done Leadville, High Cascades and Capitol Forest and a lot of other ultra endurance events. It's hard because of the amount of climbing per lap.
    I'm going to put the Butte 100 in Montana a half notch above the Creampuff in terms of difficulty.

    But the Creampuff is also a half notch better because both laps are astounding, and the first lap of the Butte 100 is pretty meh -- though the second lap is my personal favorite 50 mile lap anywhere.
    Whining is not a strategy.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    I'm going to put the Butte 100 in Montana a half notch above the Creampuff in terms of difficulty.

    But the Creampuff is also a half notch better because both laps are astounding, and the first lap of the Butte 100 is pretty meh -- though the second lap is my personal favorite 50 mile lap anywhere.
    I 100% agree about Butte 100 being more difficult. The long fire road climb (twice) in the Creampuff makes things easier because you just spin for miles and can keep hydrated/fueled. The higher elevation of Butte also adds to the challenge.

    Will you be at Creampuff this year?

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    Quote Originally Posted by economatic View Post
    I 100% agree about Butte 100 being more difficult. The long fire road climb (twice) in the Creampuff makes things easier because you just spin for miles and can keep hydrated/fueled. The higher elevation of Butte also adds to the challenge.

    Will you be at Creampuff this year?
    Yup, support role only, though. My young friend will see if his magic at Butte last year can translate to the Creampuff.

    How about you?
    Whining is not a strategy.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    Yup, support role only, though. My young friend will see if his magic at Butte last year can translate to the Creampuff.

    How about you?
    Awesome! I'm not registered yet but it's likely Heather and I will be there. We'll look for you.

    And hopefully I can find some magic this year. It should help that I won't be doing Butte a week before.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    I'm going to put the Butte 100 in Montana a half notch above the Creampuff in terms of difficulty.

    But the Creampuff is also a half notch better because both laps are astounding, and the first lap of the Butte 100 is pretty meh -- though the second lap is my personal favorite 50 mile lap anywhere.
    How much harder is Butte 100 if you could easily say something like X% harder. I've been Butte curious for years.

  47. #47
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    Anyone driving to Westfir/Oakridge from or through Portland Wednesday August 1st in the evening with extra space for a puffer and a bike? I'll pay gas.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleIPA View Post
    How much harder is Butte 100 if you could easily say something like X% harder. I've been Butte curious for years.
    Tough to quantify, so I'll waffle, but also hopefully add some useful information:

    1. Butte has elevation. During the latter parts of the race, you bounce around between 6 and 8k. Some people don't notice. For me, it was tough in the 100, and a non-issue in the 50.

    2. Butte has almost no humidity. Oakridge has humidity. 85 in Butte feels a bunch more tolerable to me than it does in Oakridge.

    3. Oakridge has lots of gravel road climbing. Butte has quite a bit less.

    4. Butte has more steep climbing and way more sand (northern loop).

    5. Winning times for Butte seem to be ~45 to 60 minutes longer.

    So l'll just estimate Butte is 10-15% harder. Both are REALLY tough 100s, compared to races like the Capitol Forest 100 or High Cascades 100.

    Hope that helps!
    Whining is not a strategy.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by kosmo View Post
    Tough to quantify, so I'll waffle, but also hopefully add some useful information:

    1. Butte has elevation. During the latter parts of the race, you bounce around between 6 and 8k. Some people don't notice. For me, it was tough in the 100, and a non-issue in the 50.

    4. Butte has more steep climbing and way more sand (northern loop).

    Hope that helps!
    Thanks Kosmo, that helps. I'll keep Butte 100 on my bucket list, but maybe leave the steel single speed at home.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleIPA View Post
    Thanks Kosmo, that helps. I'll keep Butte 100 on my bucket list, but maybe leave the steel single speed at home.
    A little taste of the Butte 100 scenery, sideways as always from my Mac:

    2018 Cascade Creampuff-cdt.jpg
    Whining is not a strategy.

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    Awkwardly broke my pinky toe getting out of bed this morning, 1 week before the Creampuff. Uggh! I was planning on doing 4 hour or so ride with a good amount of climbing tomorrow, but I'm thinking I should probably skip that. Thoughts?

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    ^^^ I'd go ride, and let (med-free) pain be your guide.

    Face it, at this point, ya got watcha got, and about all you can really add is fatigue, so be nice to your finger today, and hope it returns the favor on Saturday!
    Whining is not a strategy.

  53. #53
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    For those who raced the Creampuff, how did it go this year???
    Salsa Timberjack SS
    -Gears give me headaches

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0H_5PSNokk - Robert Johnson "32-20 blues"

    I ran SS 32-20 and had a whole bunch of things go wrong. Pretty much everything besides my drive train broke at some point and I missed the final cutoff at Aid 4 by 30 minutes; 88 miles but DNFd. Still had a ton of fun. The day could not have been better, high of only 81, probably closer to 78 at windy pass. Aid station volunteers were super helpful and encouraging. Even got a trombone serenade as I topped out Cloverpatch Tie.

    Only 20 started, but 16 finished and another 2 of us DNF'd at Aid 4 on lap 2.

    I still can't figure out why so few people show up for such a fun event. If 2000 riders show up to ride gravel roads all day, why don't at least 100 come out for *stunning* trials?

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleIPA View Post
    I ran SS 32-20 and had a whole bunch of things go wrong.

    I still can't figure out why so few people show up for such a fun event. If 2000 riders show up to ride gravel roads all day, why don't at least 100 come out for *stunning* trials?
    Bummer, Rich. Next time! I was down there in support mode, for a young friend that managed to win, after losing 21 minutes early on, blowing through Aid 3 rather than turning left onto Kate's Cutoff.

    He's still tired from that effort!

    I'm with you on the lack of attendance. When I started doing Creampuff 100s in 2006, the full field of 250 sold out. It was a blast!
    Whining is not a strategy.

  56. #56
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    ^^Good to hear your rider won, Kosmo. And not surprising at all.

    Although I was planning to race the 100 on the SS, I had to opt out at the last minute. Wildfire smoke and asthma are a terrible combination and put me in bad place. Lame.

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    ^^^ Missed seeing you and Heather down there. It was a fun day. A bit warm at the finish late in the day, but lovely on course.
    Whining is not a strategy.

  58. #58
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    For all who have raced this event-

    Im planning on racing the 2020 event (next year is a wash due to family reunion) and am looking for every scrap of info I can get ahold of- elevation profiles, route pics, cutoff times, etc... I want to be prepared, so I can enjoy the race.

    Can yall help a noobie racer out?
    Salsa Timberjack SS
    -Gears give me headaches

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sage of the Sage View Post
    For all who have raced this event-
    Can yall help a noobie racer out?
    I've finished once, as a complete noob, and DNFd once (at the last cutoff after having a day of mechanical issues). There's almost 20000ft of climbing in the current version of the puff, but *much* of it is gradual (5-8%) smooth gravel. If your goal is to finish, I'd say that if you put a good amount of training into long climbs (think 10k climbing per week for 10+ weeks) and have halfway decent descending skills, you're probably going to finish unless things go wrong like crashes and mechanicals.

    That being said, probably the best advice I could give would be (if you can) just go do a loop of the course in a non-race setting. Throw 2 bottles and a 3L camelbak full of electrolyte and some gels, gu packs, snacks etc. Start at the covered bridge, ride North Fork trail -> climb 1912 or 1910 -> Kate's Cut -> Chrome Toilet Loop -> Kate's Cut - A.T.C.A.

    Maybe have some friends who aren't into massive climbs take the shuttle and meet you at Kate's Cut.

    If you're training to podium, that's outside of my paygrade. Kosmo can probably give you advice for what it takes to do that.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sage of the Sage View Post
    For all who have raced this event-

    Im planning on racing the 2020 event (next year is a wash due to family reunion) and am looking for every scrap of info I can get ahold of- elevation profiles, route pics, cutoff times, etc... I want to be prepared, so I can enjoy the race.

    Can yall help a noobie racer out?
    2020?! Talk about advance planning. Good on ya.

    IPA's advice below of doing an actual lap of the course is spot on, if you can. When I was serious about this race, I'd go down about a month ahead of time and ride those trails in a training "block" of 3 days, 5 hours each day.

    But that isn't realistic (or desirable?) for most, so I'll just say that this race can be described with 90% accuracy as "climb sorta steep gravel roads, then descend ripping single track".

    So do that. And make sure you train up to over an hour of continuous gravel road climbing. The climb up to Aid 3 tends to go on awhile!

    If you can't do it on gravel roads, do it on paved roads, but on your actual race bike, or something very similar.

    And do some steep stuff. There isn't a lot, but that ~1.5 mile gravel road climb leading up to the Cloverpatch Tie Trail is about half a gear steeper than a civilized man should have to tolerate.

    Twice.

    In one day.
    Whining is not a strategy.

  61. #61
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    Thanks, Kosmo.

    Yeah, 2020. Ill be in Alaska next summer...
    Salsa Timberjack SS
    -Gears give me headaches

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