Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2

    How much to replace a seatstay ?

    Hi guys,

    How long does it take to replace a seatstay on an 01 ellsworth truth?
    A bike shop charged me about 90 minutes (or 90$) to remove the old one and put the new one in place… does that sound right?
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Time is not a road.
    Reputation: chad1433's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    4,136
    Just one stay? Was it on the brake side or drive side? Either way, you're talking about two bolts for the stay and maybe one for the derailleur or two for the disc caliper. Should take 30min, tops. Even if they removed one bolt on the other stay to swing the rockers/chainstays for easier removal, it shouldn't take that long.

    I assume your saying they charged you $90 labor?

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by chad1433
    Just one stay? Was it on the brake side or drive side? Either way, you're talking about two bolts for the stay and maybe one for the derailleur or two for the disc caliper. Should take 30min, tops. Even if they removed one bolt on the other stay to swing the rockers/chainstays for easier removal, it shouldn't take that long.

    I assume your saying they charged you $90 labor?
    Exactly.

  4. #4
    wpg then, van now
    Reputation: WpgRider's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    91
    Ask them to walk you through it - any decent LBS should be able to explain why they charged what they did.

  5. #5
    Rolling
    Reputation: lidarman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,119
    Seat stay?

    Most shops have standard times for various repairs. They prolly charged you for stay install, rear derailleur mounting and adjusting, brake mounting and adjusting and some silly fee for feeding that derrailleur cable back. Not sure you have much of an argument.

    The bottom line is if you don't do things yourself, you pay for the expertise and you have to deal with it. Always get the costs up front, therefore they can't easily say a 30 minute job took 90 minutes. If you just say do this, they have an almost open ticket.

  6. #6
    Rolling
    Reputation: lidarman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,119
    Quote Originally Posted by chad1433
    Just one stay? Was it on the brake side or drive side? Either way, you're talking about two bolts for the stay and maybe one for the derailleur or two for the disc caliper.
    Chad, the stay is a single piece. There is no brake side piece or drive side piece.

  7. #7
    Time is not a road.
    Reputation: chad1433's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    4,136
    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    Chad, the stay is a single piece. There is no brake side piece or drive side piece.
    Gotcha, these mount on the chainstays?

    Even more reason to be upset about much he was charged. Unless they had to remove and press bearings, but again, would this be necessary?

  8. #8
    Silver bullet
    Reputation: djb55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    202
    I replaced the seatstay on my Truth this summer and I would say that 90 minutes is a reasonable time.

    I do all of my own work and I'm not trying to defend bike shops that do overcharge but working in a field where I do charge for my time (not working on bikes at all) one has to remember what's involved. Paperwork for one, no one likes it but it's there and the customer has to pay for it.

    The guy has to charge his time from the time he picks up the paperwork, finds the bike, finds the parts, puts the bike in the stand, do the work and the...yup, finishes the paperwork and then calls the customer to tell him it's done.

    Last but not least, if you got the new style seatstay where you have to thread the shifter cable through the drive side tube this can get time consuming and .

  9. #9
    Rolling
    Reputation: lidarman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,119
    Quote Originally Posted by chad1433
    Gotcha, these mount on the chainstays?
    No, this is not a Turner TNT design, all the stuff mounts on the seatstay. The chainstay has nothing attached and is three bolts, the hardest being the BB pivot bolt which takes careful technique to remove.

    My chainstay took me at most 5 minutes to install.

    Then 10 minutes of taking pix to post!

  10. #10
    Time is not a road.
    Reputation: chad1433's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    4,136
    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    No, this is not a Turner TNT design, all the stuff mounts on the seatstay. The chainstay has nothing attached and is three bolts, the hardest being the BB pivot bolt which takes careful technique to remove.

    My chainstay took me at most 5 minutes to install.

    Then 10 minutes of taking pix to post!
    I thought he was changing a seatstay...

  11. #11
    Rolling
    Reputation: lidarman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,119
    Quote Originally Posted by chad1433
    I thought he was changing a seatstay...
    Are we have two separate conversations here? He is. I just *tried* to make the point that a chainstay is easy to change relative to a seatstay.....the seatstay requires a brake and a derailleur to be mounted, and adjusted....thus taking longer.

    I thought you were arguing that there are no parts attached to the seatstay and it should be easy to change.

    Quote Originally Posted by chad1433
    Gotcha, these mount on the chainstays?

  12. #12
    Time is not a road.
    Reputation: chad1433's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    4,136
    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    Are we have two separate conversations here? He is. I just *tried* to make the point that a chainstay is easy to change relative to a seatstay.....the seatstay requires a brake and a derailleur to be mounted, and adjusted....thus taking longer.

    I thought you were arguing that there are no parts attached to the seatstay and it should be easy to change.
    Ok, so looking at the photo, I see that one seatstay side would carry the dropout, one would carry the disc tabs. Is that not right?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  13. #13
    Rolling
    Reputation: lidarman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,119
    Quote Originally Posted by chad1433
    Ok, so looking at the photo, I see that one seatstay side would carry the dropout, one would carry the disc tabs. Is that not right?

    Yes!!!!!!!!!!!!! But back to the original thing that started this all...the seatstay is one solid unit (left and right) and when you replace it, you replace both sides. That means you have to put the brake on the left side and the derailleur on the right side...

    It's not just a few bolts by the rocker and the dropout--that's the easy part. Threading the friggen cable through the stay is the interesting part..but there are threads on this.

  14. #14
    Silver bullet
    Reputation: djb55's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    202
    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    Threading the friggen cable through the stay is the interesting part..but there are threads on this.
    Can you tell me where the threads are on this? I've had pretty good luck with it but there are always better ways.

    Thanks.

  15. #15
    Rolling
    Reputation: lidarman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    11,119
    Quote Originally Posted by Crash dummy
    Can you tell me where the threads are on this? I've had pretty good luck with it but there are always better ways.

    Thanks.
    While I look...the best way seems to be using a vaccuum cleaner to put a thread through from the dropout side to tape or superglue the cable to.

    ..or if you think ahead, pull a string through when you remove the old cable.

    Threading rear derailleur cable
    Last edited by lidarman; 11-01-2006 at 05:53 PM.

  16. #16
    Time is not a road.
    Reputation: chad1433's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    4,136
    Quote Originally Posted by lidarman
    Yes!!!!!!!!!!!!! But back to the original thing that started this all...the seatstay is one solid unit (left and right) and when you replace it, you replace both sides. That means you have to put the brake on the left side and the derailleur on the right side...

    It's not just a few bolts by the rocker and the dropout--that's the easy part. Threading the friggen cable through the stay is the interesting part..but there are threads on this.
    I see. I had to look at my bike (home now). I was thinking they were individual pieces, for whatever reason.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •