Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 26
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    141

    For those in the GTA, did you anyone seriously do any biking today? commute to work?

    I took one look outside and auto-started my internal combustion engine... and I did not see anyone although i'm sure there are some hard core bikers around. With all the ice I doubt there'd be any real way to control the bike
    2007 Specialized
    FSR XC COMP

  2. #2
    Ms. Monster
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,750
    I did - on my road bike no less. I'm in Hamilton. It was pretty slushy, but not slippery. We'll see on the ride home. There's quite a lot of snow on the ground now...

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CptSydor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,458
    Hamilton wasn't bad at all. Last night heading east on the way home was far worse. From the sounds of the cancellations in the Toronto region, it must have been alot worse.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    846
    Yup, 6 km one-way on my road commuter. Going home is mostly uphill into 30-40 km/h winds though.

  5. #5
    Space for rent...
    Reputation: SSteve F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,012
    I think I will pass on my lunchtime ride today. Still recovering from my downhill, in the rain, wet leaves on hardpack mud experiment
    It's only pain......

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    141
    I don't get it though how your rode commuter can get through....aren't your tires just spinning out of control with all the ice ???

    Also... aren't you afraid of a driver slipping and sliding into you?
    2007 Specialized
    FSR XC COMP

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    846
    Quote Originally Posted by macmac
    I don't get it though how your rode commuter can get through....aren't your tires just spinning out of control with all the ice ???

    Also... aren't you afraid of a driver slipping and sliding into you?
    It's originally a touring bike (it's done the Blue Ridge Parkway, and 5 weeks in Europe). I've got 700 x 35 tires with a decent tread on them. I find that on a day like today, it's actually better to be in the new fresh snow and pack it down myself, than to ride where the cars have already packed it down. Yes, there were a few slippery moments, but not unlike racing through singletrack. Perhaps I'm improving my bike handling skills on a day like today. Mostly, though I'm avoiding a second vehicle payment (so I can spend that money on my summer bikes).

    Lastly, I'm always wary of drivers, but the *^%%$*& who cut in front of me today would have done the same thing in August.

    I've been a year-round bike commuter since 1999. I've fallen twice because of icy conditions, and probably have a total of about 10 "wimp-outs" during that time.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Wolfchild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    142
    I commuted with my mtb today I left home 6:00 in the morning and I just took my time slow and easy the side walks were very icy but I had no problems controlling my bike, in the afternoon I also rode along the sidewalks but they were more snowy, no problem at all
    not too much salt at all along the sidewalks but I am still gona rinse my bike with lots of water and then lube it. All I can say is that this is getting to be more and more fun.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Wolfchild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    142
    Well, I just finished cleaning my bike after the messy commute today, heres what I did:
    I put my bike in the bathtub, stood it up on the rear wheel with the front wheel against the wall and I turned on the shower and washed all the crap off. After the bike was dry I lubed the chain and the derraileurs, she is all ready to go tommorow morning.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    141
    Wolfchild...to have to do that after EVERY snowy ride... it just isn't worth it...lol

    When riding in the snow, should your tires be under or a bit over inflated?
    2007 Specialized
    FSR XC COMP

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: prod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    144
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfchild
    Well, I just finished cleaning my bike after the messy commute today, heres what I did:
    I put my bike in the bathtub, stood it up on the rear wheel with the front wheel against the wall and I turned on the shower and washed all the crap off. After the bike was dry I lubed the chain and the derraileurs, she is all ready to go tommorow morning.
    I bet you dont live with a wife/girlfriend. I would be drawn and quartered.
    In this kind of slushy riding, narrower tires seem to work better, dont you think?

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Wolfchild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    142
    Quote Originally Posted by prod
    I bet you dont live with a wife/girlfriend. I would be drawn and quartered.
    ?
    Yes that's true I live alone (been seperated for a long time now), but hey being single has it's advantages

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    846
    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfchild
    Well, I just finished cleaning my bike after the messy commute today, heres what I did:
    I put my bike in the bathtub, stood it up on the rear wheel with the front wheel against the wall and I turned on the shower and washed all the crap off. After the bike was dry I lubed the chain and the derraileurs, she is all ready to go tommorow morning.
    I often do that too (in one of the showers available at work that no one else seems to use) - yup, I've got a pretty sweet set-up for winter commuting

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: serious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    2,976
    I am all for winter riding (the recent WOW race was partially on snow), but I would find it very difficult to trust drivers around me when it is slippery like yesterday. I don't even trust drivers during summer when I go on the road for training (I don't do any commuting).

    You guys have nerves of steel to turn you backs on all those "not so great" drivers who could easily lose control in winter driving.
    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SL singlespeed
    GF Superfly 29er HT
    S-Works Roubaix SL3 Dura Ace
    Pake French 75 track

  15. #15
    Singlespeed Mysty
    Reputation: 1mystk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    646

    ... and if we just ... you're not the only one...

    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfchild
    Well, I just finished cleaning my bike after the messy commute today, heres what I did:
    I put my bike in the bathtub, stood it up on the rear wheel with the front wheel against the wall and I turned on the shower and washed all the crap off. After the bike was dry I lubed the chain and the derraileurs, she is all ready to go tommorow morning.

    wolf ... I take my bike into the shower too once all the taps outside the house are closed off for winter ...

    no boyfriend here to tell me I can't
    "I became a member of Team Misfit Psycles because of the free coasters"

    diSSent 29er SS
    www.misfitpsycles.com

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    846
    Quote Originally Posted by serious
    I am all for winter riding (the recent WOW race was partially on snow), but I would find it very difficult to trust drivers around me when it is slippery like yesterday. I don't even trust drivers during summer when I go on the road for training (I don't do any commuting).

    You guys have nerves of steel to turn you backs on all those "not so great" drivers who could easily lose control in winter driving.
    1. Good car routes are not good bike routes. If you can't find a commute with lightly travelled residential streets or actual bike lanes or paths, then you are at risk.

    2. Take the lane when you have to. In winter this sometimes means taking more of it than summer because of 4-5 unusable feet of slush, ice or plowed snow, but the drivers behind are simply going to have to wait to pass. Luckily, if you can accomplish #1, this should not be a problem.

    3. I don't trust drivers, nor should any cyclist. Assume that they will screw up, that they don't see you, that they will misjudge your speed, and that they don't believe you should be on the road. Ride defensively, and as they taught you in Driver's Ed, be aware of the big picture.

    I commuted again today and it was fun. Not as much fun as a 2 hour trail ride in July, but still fun.

  17. #17
    Ms. Monster
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1,750
    Bike routes really make a huge difference. Hamilton actually does a great job with this. Most of my commute is on a bicycle/pedestrian-only path, so my only fear is falling over, not being crushed by a tonne of steel. They also do a fantastic job keeping the bike path cleared. I only switch to my mountain bike (for commuting) a few days per year - the rest of the time the skinny tires do just fine. I also don't bother with the daily bike shower. My commuter bike is a beater. I just accept that it'll eventually succumb to the elements.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    846
    Quote Originally Posted by Nerdgirl
    My commuter bike is a beater. I just accept that it'll eventually succumb to the elements.
    Exactly. Every spring, for the price of one oil change and a tank of gas (and for way less than a single loan payment on a second vehicle), I treat my commuter to whatever it needs (usually a new chain, sometimes an entire new drivetrain, new cables, etc.). Because it's a commuter, we're not talking Dura-Ace either (or Ultegra, or 105, or Tiagra...). Anyway, who really cares about extra mechanical resistance in the riding conditions you face in the winter?

    And...do you know how fast a 15 lb. carbon fibre road bike feels on a warm spring day after a winter of commuting on a 30 lb. bike with 35mm treaded tires and panniers on snow-covered roads in sub-zero temperatures into cold NW winds? Woo-hoo.

  19. #19
    More than a little slow
    Reputation: dskunk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    603
    Quote Originally Posted by serious
    I am all for winter riding (the recent WOW race was partially on snow), but I would find it very difficult to trust drivers around me when it is slippery like yesterday. I don't even trust drivers during summer when I go on the road for training (I don't do any commuting).

    You guys have nerves of steel to turn you backs on all those "not so great" drivers who could easily lose control in winter driving.
    Hey Serious,
    Sort of wish I'd done the WOW race.
    Commuting really isn't that bad, I've been year round on major roads for the last 15 years and for the most part people are fairly good. I have been hit twice, but both times it was by people making right hand turns onto the street that I was on and I saw the whole thing happening ie if I had realized a little earlier what was happening I could have avoided the incident ( both times it was people making rolling right hand turns on red lights, I don't think that should be allowed on urban streets )
    And to stay with the thread, I didn't ride the last few days, I was in Vancouver. There are not many days in Toronto though that are unridable, the only weather that I bail on almost automatically is freezing rain.
    Cheers, Dave

    edit: An addition to the above. I certainly wouldn't advocate riding in conditions that you don't feel comfortable riding in ( or on roads that you don't feel comfortable on ) . If you aren't enjoying it there doesn't seem to be much point eh?
    Last edited by dskunk; 11-23-2007 at 12:00 PM.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: serious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    2,976
    dskunk,

    Perhaps I am a bit of a wuss when it comes to road riding. I have to force myself to road ride in the summer and I am never too comfy. I do love road riding, but drivers are sometimes so angry and buzz you for no reason. I am one of those who takes as little space as possible on the road. I know people think this is wrong, but I ride north of Richmodn Hill on roads where cars go 70-90 km/hr, so I am not about to try to slow them down by taking too much space.

    As for the WOW race, I think you would have loved it. You could have done it on the SS and give Mark and Peter a good challenge.
    My rides:
    Lynskey Ti Pro29 SL singlespeed
    GF Superfly 29er HT
    S-Works Roubaix SL3 Dura Ace
    Pake French 75 track

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    392
    Quote Originally Posted by Nerdgirl
    Bike routes really make a huge difference. Hamilton actually does a great job with this.
    Really? You must live in a different Hamilton than I do :P The rail/radial trails that are here in the Hammer are nice, but on-road bike routes or bike lanes that actually get you from point A to B quickly are non-existant.

    I also love how Hamilton has installed bike racks on all the buses....just in time for the middle of November, when very few if any riders will actually use them. Great initiative, but still make me question why they had the project done for November????

    Tim

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    141
    Hey folks, dskunk, how do you stomach riding all year round? For example today the temperature was roughly -7 to -9.... I walked to my car and my legs had frozen up, and the air...probably the biggest single challenge for me...is the freezing cold air entering my lungs...it's tough to deal with that. Next week we should be back to +4-6 which is much easier to endure
    2007 Specialized
    FSR XC COMP

  23. #23
    NormalNorm
    Reputation: norm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    935
    Yeah, I also find the Hammer not too bike friendly. All the mountain access routes are brutal for riding up. Funny, they re-did Upper James in 2003 for the World cycling championship, but never put in a bike lane. I'm noticing more bike lanes though....ex. Stone Church. Hopefully, we will see more of them.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Wolfchild's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    142
    Quote Originally Posted by macmac
    Hey folks, dskunk, how do you stomach riding all year round? For example today the temperature was roughly -7 to -9.... I walked to my car and my legs had frozen up, and the air...probably the biggest single challenge for me...is the freezing cold air entering my lungs...it's tough to deal with that. Next week we should be back to +4-6 which is much easier to endure
    I am starting to find out that riding a bike in below freezing temps is very similar to xc skiing. I have XC skied in -22 below zero so riding a bike in around -8 is nothing for me,
    I warm up really well after about 5-10 minutes of riding. I wear a combination of synthetics and wool and dress in layers.

  25. #25
    More than a little slow
    Reputation: dskunk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    603
    macmac,
    I wish I had an answer for you about cold air in your lungs. To be honest I've never had a problem with that at all. As far as the rest goes, good clothes help a lot (layers of synthetic and wool like Wolfchild, although I stick with wool only), staying as light as possible on the pedals and handlebars, and chemical heat packs for really cold days. I get addicted to the environment Canada phone line and try to make sure that I know just how cold it's going to be. 'Bout twice a year I screw up and end up dancing around the office singing the F song ( sort of talking head ish " Fuh, fuh fuh fuh fuh, fuh fuh, but more explicit ) as my hands and feet thaw out.
    It's not so much "how do you stomach riding all year round" as much as it is "what would you do/be if you didn't ride year round"
    By the way, it's an odd thing reading posts from everyone else who commutes. Commuting, unlike mtbing, is pretty solitary (serious excluded ). I'd started to think of myself as the only one, even though I wasn't, 'cause I was the only one that I knew. Anyway that's just a comment, doesn't really mean anything, welcome to the internet, whatever....
    Cheers,Dave

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •