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  1. #1
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    To Road or Not to Road

    So this year I ended a long mtb hiatus by buying a used norco Sasquatch to see if I would like getting back into biking. I've become addicted to flying through the woods every chance I get once again. Now that I'm sure I'm enjoying it again I'm looking to upgrade my bike and get into something more xc specific. On the other hand, my riding partner has recently purchased a road bike and says I've got to get one. My dilemma is that i can't get both but really would like to get into road riding too. I've purchased a good mtb in getting my Norco but it's heavy and not really made for what I'm using it for. So I'm looking at the Norco Killer B Sight 3 as my mtb upgrade or a Scott CR1 comp road bike.
    So, should I stick with the mtb I have for now and get the road bike....or do i say screw road riding for now and upgrade to the new mtb?

  2. #2
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    As the resident Dirt Bag I can understand the issue of budget and wanting it all. Even tougher when one you are looking at new.

    What year was the sasquatch?

    Budget?

  3. #3
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    My Sasquatch is a 2007. A little old but in fine spine mashing shape. Scored it for 250 bucks. My new budget is in and around 1500.

  4. #4
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    Depends on your goals and location, if you live close to trails a new mtb would be my choice.
    A road bike would help maximize your training time, cutting down on travelling to and from the trails...
    A 2hr mtb ride could easily become a 3.5-4 hr activity, away from family and other things..

  5. #5
    Ms. Monster
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    I'd agree that location is all-important. If road riding from your front door is a PITA, I'd probably go with the mtb. I've lived lots of places that I hated road biking. Too many lights / too much traffic / too flat... In the west end (Milton, Burlington, Dundas) there is fantastic road biking (and good mtb too...). To me, somehow, I don't mind traveling to mountain bike, but it bugs me to have to drive on roads to road bike.

  6. #6
    Evil Jr.
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    This is quite a dilemma! Fortunately, you'll find that most of us started off similarly. My advice would be to get the road bike now while the season still has some life in it. Keep plugging away on the MTB and save your pennies in time for the Spring bike show (usually in March). Go to the Trek booth and pick-up a lightly-used demo at a deep discount. Viola!

    There is a formula to describe the optimum amount of bikes any rider should own: N+1, where N is the current number of bikes you have. In short, more bikes = more fun.
    Please enjoy seeing this terrible collection of me - something wonderful is about to happy.

  7. #7
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    I would get the MTB. You CAN ride a MTB on the road for training when the weather/trails are not suitable. I know it's not the same and you will probably not be able to keep up to roadies. If you have to have one bike, it would be the MTB for me. Can you get that Norco around $1500.00? I thought that started at $2500.00
    Fortunately, I have not been faced with this problem. I have a most understanding wife and all the bikes I need/want.
    Burnt Norton

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by garage monster View Post

    There is a formula to describe the optimum amount of bikes any rider should own: N+1, where N is the current number of bikes you have. In short, more bikes = more fun.
    So true!!
    Right now I have a decent mtb, an entry level road bike which I'd like to upgrade soon, and I'm thinking about buying a cyclocross bike just to open up my options around my home...
    That would be a good investment as well, you can use it on paved roads, gravel side roads and you can get into the forest on the double track as well
    .
    Buying a new bike is always exciting!!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerdgirl View Post
    To me, somehow, I don't mind traveling to mountain bike, but it bugs me to have to drive on roads to road bike.
    Ha! I know exactly what you mean... and that is one of the pleasures of road riding.

    My advice would be to save up until you can have both bikes, depending on your budget.

    First, go used. You can sell a bike for not much more than you paid if you change your mind. If you can do your own work, you can save a crapload of money.

    Second, don't buy cheap/crap bikes. Do your research, especially if buying used. Long term, they're just not worth it.

    Last, and I don't think you'll like this, but I'd say get some cheap slicks for your mountain bike, suck it up and keep saving until you can get something you'll want to keep long term.

    You're not super happy with your present mountain bike, and that's your joy. I think you should wait until you can get the mountain bike you want, then start saving for a used road bike. A mountain bike can be ridden on the road. A road bike's not fun on the trails.

    That said, road bikes are awesome!

    Have fun!

  10. #10
    Ms. Monster
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    A couple more thoughts:
    - A riding partner is not to be scoffed at
    - I have the Scott Comtessa Pro (Women's version) and LOVE it
    - You can get some crazy good deals in the fall for mountain bikes the pro/sponsored riders are done with for the season often posted in the Canadian Cyclist classifieds.

  11. #11
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    I am a very simple man, and like to quantify things in the simplest of terms...so here it is:

    If you are going for training, go for the road bike.

    If you are all about the fun, go for the mtb.

  12. #12
    Evil Jr.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerdgirl View Post
    - You can get some crazy good deals in the fall for mountain bikes the pro/sponsored riders are done with for the season often posted in the Canadian Cyclist classifieds.
    This is true. A friend of ours bought MikaŽla Kofman's bike from the previous year and it was a great deal!
    Please enjoy seeing this terrible collection of me - something wonderful is about to happy.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerdgirl View Post
    A couple more thoughts:
    - A riding partner is not to be scoffed at
    - I have the Scott Comtessa Pro (Women's version) and LOVE it
    - You can get some crazy good deals in the fall for mountain bikes the pro/sponsored riders are done with for the season often posted in the Canadian Cyclist classifieds.
    Of course don't forget the side effects of the Upgradeitis symptons. That being alot of stuff used yet still good being sold off by riders who wanted the new shiny thing part.

  14. #14
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    Depending on what age group demographic you're at now, in my view, mountain biking's a little rougher on the body than road biking (a lot in my case, just hit the ground one more time on sunday).... cash it in while you can! I'm looking forward to doing a lot more road riding once I 'retire' from singletrack.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by RiotMTB View Post

    If you are going for training, go for the road bike.
    If this is the case I would say go for a cross bike. Much more versatile then just having a road bike. And allows you to ride other places not just pavement...rail trail, farm/gravel road, and so on.

  16. #16
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    I would place my bet with secret agent (can always ride an mtb on the road esp if you have two ) and with Enduramil ( if going road, go cross or something similar that lets you hit non paved stuff )
    Am I allowed to place my bet in two places like that?

    Of course if you're going to get into road RACING then you need a real road bike and a second mortgage. Not that there's anything wrong with that.
    Cheers, Dave

  17. #17
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    Norco Performance Bikes: 2007 Norco Sasquatch

    Reality is the Sasquatch frame is built as a aluminium bomber hard tail. It's not designed for light it for taking abuse. It is what is termed a Shore Hardtail, taking 5 foot drops and teeter totters. Still get you home.

    First thing I'd actually suggest changing is frame. Figure out your frame size and start perusing the Pinkbike ads. Pretty soon it will be end of season and people will start selling off their frames and stuff to pay for stuff like school.

    Other option would be a new On One 456 frame,

    On-One 456 Evo2 Frame

    Just swap everything over and sell off the Sasquatch frame for $100.

  18. #18
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    If your spouse has a road bike and is getting excited about the sport, get a road bike so you can ride with her. That way you have an activity you can enjoy with your spouse, and when it does come time for the new XC bike,she will be more understanding. Of course, if you can keep up with her on your MTB with slicks, that could work too...

    If you are not planning on doing anything too extreme the Norco will do you just fine until you can swing a new MTB (BTW garage monsters idea re the Trek store demo sale is a good call) and to some extent you will have the best of both worlds in the meantime...
    Strava made me do it....

  19. #19
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    Cross bikes are awesome. Just saying ...

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by limba View Post
    Cross bikes are awesome. Just saying ...
    Agree 100% but I've always thought of them as a perfect third bike. Since they're neither fish nor fowl, better to start with the two primary "quiver" bikes and move on from there... unless you're limited to just one bike (boo!).
    Please enjoy seeing this terrible collection of me - something wonderful is about to happy.

  21. #21
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    easy call.

    upgrade to the best MTB that you can afford right now and enjoy the rest of the season. look at some used bikes, pre-owned by sponsored riders - they will come at a great price... also look at demo fleet by Trek and Specialized - speak with Trek store directly about the selling dates - do not limit yourself to just Norco... they are other great options out there... nothing wrong with Norco.

    then start saving cash for a good road bike, because you need both. buy it when you are ready.

    in the meantime - use your MTB on the road with some slick tires, as suggested.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kay. View Post
    Depending on what age group demographic you're at now, in my view, mountain biking's a little rougher on the body than road biking (a lot in my case, just hit the ground one more time on sunday).... cash it in while you can! I'm looking forward to doing a lot more road riding once I 'retire' from singletrack.
    when i retire from single track, it will be after they wheel my coffin on the single track on it's way to my final resting place, in order to dump it 6 feet deep.

    not a second before.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by osokolo View Post
    when i retire from single track, it will be after they wheel my coffin on the single track on it's way to my final resting place, in order to dump it 6 feet deep.

    not a second before.
    I had similar thoughts. Perhaps something like this:


  24. #24
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    road bike is awesome, when I got mine I couldn't ride far enough, 50-100-150 km and finally the Mt Washington bicycle hill climb BUT it is not MTBing. It is not clear that your riding partner is your s/o but that is a different thing. My wife started riding 10 years ago and lucky for us she had a few girlfriends that also rode. They trained around here and road the 100 km Perth to Kingston and back a few times. We seldom rode together.
    If your riding partner is not really committed you might have to reconsider.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Face Visor View Post
    I had similar thoughts. Perhaps something like this:

    lol, is that funeral in Portland? :P
    Please enjoy seeing this terrible collection of me - something wonderful is about to happy.

  26. #26
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    One other thing about being old and crashing... don't do it.

    butt seriously, if you crash on a road bike if sucks just as bad as a trail wreck.

  27. #27
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    A cheap 10-20 year old used steel road bike won't be as nice as a modern road bike but will be a lot better for road riding than a MTB with slicks and let you save most of your $$ for the new MTB.

    No, downtube or stem shifters with 10 or 12 speeds isn't convenient or cool as far as road bikes go, but it's going to give you most of the speed.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by osokolo View Post
    when i retire from single track, it will be after they wheel my coffin on the single track on it's way to my final resting place, in order to dump it 6 feet deep.

    not a second before.
    I finally went full suspension 29er last year to give the body a bit of a break. I foresee a full suspension recumbent/wheel chair or whatever it takes to keep me on the dirt.
    I was not always able to afford a stable of bikes and rode my MTB for everything. A good MTB is not a road bike, but if set up correctly will be fine on the road. I like doing some urban riding on my road rides and will often take the MTB for 50-70 km rides just so I can ride on ledges, benches and other urban features. There is also that advantage if you like that sort of thing.
    Burnt Norton

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickboers View Post
    A cheap 10-20 year old used steel road bike won't be as nice as a modern road bike but will be a lot better for road riding than a MTB with slicks and let you save most of your $$ for the new MTB.

    No, downtube or stem shifters with 10 or 12 speeds isn't convenient or cool as far as road bikes go, but it's going to give you most of the speed.
    Have you ridden a modern carbon road bike with modern parts?

    I grew up riding steel, will never buy a carbon mountain bike, my beater is steel and I still ride 2 steel mountain bikes.

    On the road, however, I would never ride anything but carbon with recent generation parts. The leaps in technology have carried through to ride quality. It's not just about the speed of a road bike, but comfort, control, lightness.... the "joy" factor.

    Don't get a cheap bike, a CX bike is not a substitute for a good road bike (it's an adequate substitute, but it will be heavier, with a more sluggish geometry and more upright position than a road bike), buying parts separate may save you a bit of money over buying new, but the cheapest way to get parts is to buy them as part of a complete bike, new or used. Sell what you don't need.

    It's good to ask this question, we've all gone through exactly what you are. While you are getting different advice from all of us, it's all useful, because it's all based on experience.

    have fun...

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnikcdn View Post
    Have you ridden a modern carbon road bike with modern parts?
    I got started by borrowing for a few weeks a friends old steel Miele that he found at the side of the road on garbage day. I went and bought an Alloy Devinci with Ultegra/105 after those few weeks. I replaced it with an '08 Cervelo R3sl with '11 Rival on it last year. It's an awesome bike. Better in every way than the Miele I got hooked on.

    I spend more time and miles on the road bike than anything, but if I had to choose between my XC, road or DH bikes of similar value and level of modern technology to be replaced with something cheap or old it would be the road bike.

  31. #31
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    I rode 125k on my mtn bike with Conti Race King tires last Sunday. I climbed Woolverton hill 3 times and Mountain once (Grimsby Ontario). Monday and tonight I did over 75k of mixed surfaces on the same bike with the same tires. Tomorrow I will unleash Hell on my cross bike. :P
    I'd say pick the right tool for the job but your legs and lungs will always determine how fast you move.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnikcdn View Post
    Have you ridden a modern carbon road bike with modern parts?

    I grew up riding steel, will never buy a carbon mountain bike, my beater is steel and I still ride 2 steel mountain bikes.

    On the road, however, I would never ride anything but carbon with recent generation parts. The leaps in technology have carried through to ride quality. It's not just about the speed of a road bike, but comfort, control, lightness.... the "joy" factor.

    Don't get a cheap bike, a CX bike is not a substitute for a good road bike (it's an adequate substitute, but it will be heavier, with a more sluggish geometry and more upright position than a road bike), buying parts separate may save you a bit of money over buying new, but the cheapest way to get parts is to buy them as part of a complete bike, new or used. Sell what you don't need.

    It's good to ask this question, we've all gone through exactly what you are. While you are getting different advice from all of us, it's all useful, because it's all based on experience.

    have fun...
    Actually I think many here need to keep things in perspective. I say this as I have been spending some time with beginner riders lately. And it has shown that what I think they want or need is pretty much what not the answer.

    Most here are experienced riders who race and/or have many miles under them. But the reality is the Original Poster not only has a limited budget but isn't from what his post seem to looking for any kind of race type bike. Just wants to give it a try and see if he likes it. And let's face reality like most here when we got started we didn't want to spend lots of money either due to budget. Or bought used till we decided we actually liked road or off road bikes.

    What Nick Boers posts about used is a good way to get started, especially if he has no idea if he will like it. Because till he does. Well, no point in actually shelling out lots of money. And I bet if the OP is patient he can find something for $500.

  33. #33
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    If I could have only one bike, it would be the 29er hard tail. It does pretty much everything my cross bike does and more. I can put 60psi in the tires and ride the road at a good clip as well.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by osokolo View Post
    when i retire from single track, it will be after they wheel my coffin on the single track on it's way to my final resting place, in order to dump it 6 feet deep.

    not a second before.
    Stuffed and on a pedastal in the main entrance hall at Hardwood. Just sayin'.
    Cheers, Dave

  35. #35
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    Just a thought, where do you live Drumsngolf?

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