Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    pin it
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    10,230

    Rare cougar sightings in Mono



    Rare cougar sightings stir concern in Mono
    Rare cougar sightings spark concern in the town of Mono.

    Two extremely rare cougar sightings in the town of Mono, Ont., have sparked both concern and excitement.
    A Mono resident called police Sunday morning after spotting a cougar walking down Leader Dr. in the town, just north of Orangeville, around 9 a.m.
    “The road runs right behind a public school,” said OPP Const. Paul Nancekivell. “It’s of concern to the town of Mono.”
    The principal at Mono Amaranth Public School said recess continues because the OPP said students are safe outdoors. The school didn’t inform students of the cougar sightings, so as not to scare them, but teachers have discussed emergency procedures.
    “We’d ring the bell, which we’re hoping would scare the animal away,” said principal Peter Leblanc.
    A cougar was also spotted Saturday on a rural side road about 23 kilometres from the school.
    Ontario cougars — a species also called mountain lions and pumas — are rarely seen. The last cougar officially recorded by the province was shot and killed in 1884, but 189 possible sightings were reported between 1935 and 1983. However, there is firm evidence the cats live in Ontario.
    “While we know there are cougars in the province, we also know they are extremely rare,” cougar researcher Rick Rosatte says in a statement on the Ministry of Natural Resources website.
    A group of 89 biologists and wildlife technicians banded together with the Ministry of Natural Resources in 2006 to seek proof of Ontario cougars. Since then, the team has documented more than 30 cases of cougar tracks and droppings, but a single cat has yet to be officially spotted.
    Stuart Kenn has been tracking cougars — or pumas, as he insists on the scientific name — since 1974, but has yet to see one in the flesh.
    “They’re shy and elusive animals; normally they’re three hills over before you see or hear it,” said Kenn, president of the Ontario Puma Foundation.
    Kenn, a cartographer, has set up “trail cams” in puma populated areas, but has yet to catch a cat on film. He also collects witness accounts from across the province, but says many don’t pan out.
    “Ninety-five per cent of sightings aren’t pumas to begin with. They could be coyotes, dogs, cats, just about anything else.”
    Michigan has been considered unofficial cougar country in North America; the state’s Ministry of Natural Resources has confirmed 15 sightings since 2008. The most recent verified cougar sighting in Michigan was last May, after a man snapped a photo of a cougar crossing a road and fleeing into the woods.
    One of the few videos of a wild cougar was shot in Michigan in 2011. The black-and-white video shows the large cat stroll past a nighttime camera.
    The Ontario ministry said there is a possibility some cougars roaming free here are former pets.
    “It’s likely that escaped or intentionally released cougars — from zoos and private homes — are responsible for at least some of the sightings,” Rosatte said. “Or they could be a genetic mix from different sources — remnants of a small native population or migrants from the west.”
    The Mono sighting has yet to be verified as a cougar. The Ministry of Natural Resources says many alleged cougar sightings turn out to be bobcats, lynx and even house cats.
    Cougars, listed as an endangered species, can grow to almost 3 metres long and weigh up to 100 kilograms. The OPP says cougars can be deadly and warns Mono residents to supervise pets outside and avoid areas populated by deer, as they could be a cougar’s lunch.
    There is no record of a cougar attack on a human in Ontario. But if approached by a cougar, Rosatte has some advice.
    “One should slowly back away from the animal, stand tall and look as large as possible, and fight back with any object if attacked.”


    Rare cougar sightings stir concern in Mono | Toronto Star
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    343

  3. #3
    Workin for the weekend!
    Reputation: -Todd-'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    655
    Steve French!

  4. #4
    Dorkimus Prime
    Reputation: Biggie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    1,463
    THey usually pick off the plump lame ones at the back of the pack. I'll lose sleep, the rest of you folk are fine!
    "I love being on a bike. It helps me feel free. I get it from my dad", by Guillaume Blanchet

  5. #5
    dru
    dru is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    2,643
    Cougar, too cool. Now the young guys can go into the woods to pick up instead of the bar.......

    Drew
    occasional cyclist

  6. #6
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    13,915
    That looks more like a bobcat than a cougar in that photo, it looks a bit stripey.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  7. #7
    humber river advocate
    Reputation: singlesprocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    6,031
    Quote Originally Posted by dru View Post
    Cougar, too cool. Now the young guys can go into the woods to pick up instead of the bar.......

    Drew
    toby jug saturday night here in caledon
    Support TORBA
    Sunnyside Bike Park Working Group
    Albion Hills Conservation Area Master Plan Public Advisory Committee

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: trailtrash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,140
    the toronto star article is from back last summer.
    A friend says she saw a cougar back in december near mono center in the evening along side of the road as she slowly drove by on the way to the pub.freaked her right out. She got a real close look as it did not run away immediately making me wonder if it was one that was released from captivity therefore not to shy of people (not a good thing).
    She's not to sure about biking or running alone in mono cliffs anymore.
    Team Van Go

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Thatshowiroll's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,224
    So now we've got shy Cougars with mono at Toby Jugs?

  10. #10
    pin it
    Reputation: cyclelicious's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    10,230
    Trail Trash you are right this is from last summer! The article came up on a newsfeed and I thought it was new.

    False alarm !

    All is safe again at the Toby Jug
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: tyh83's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    318
    Quote Originally Posted by broadwayline View Post
    I Forgot all about Steve French!!!! so awesome!
    Team Van Go
    Santa Cruz Heckler
    Rocky Mountain Element 70
    Salsa Mukluk - Fat Bike!
    http://www.teamvango.ca

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,644
    Cougar on the Squamish Chief trail.



    Pretty much the only animal out there that gives me the chills. I try not to think about them when riding solo.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 90
    Last Post: 01-24-2013, 08:57 PM
  2. 650b sightings
    By StiHacka in forum 27.5 - 650b
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 07-10-2012, 06:51 PM
  3. Bigfoot Sightings while Riding
    By bloodyknee in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 10-29-2011, 09:05 PM
  4. Trail sightings
    By mtbxplorer in forum Women's Lounge
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 03-29-2011, 10:32 AM
  5. Any Bandit sightings yet?
    By Modig in forum Transition Bikes
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-08-2011, 11:26 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •