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  1. #1
    humber river advocate
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    the official eastern canada "point & shoot" camera mtb guide

    you know if you walk into a camera store and ask them to set you up with a system that you can take with you while mountain biking chances are you will get a blank look.

    i've learned a couple of things taking pictures over ten years while mtbing. while this might not work for everyone, it does work for me...

    things i look for in a point and shoot camera:

    -size of camera
    you don't want something huge that you can't carry around or won't fit in your pack.
    on the other hand you don't something that is to small with the buttons hard to press

    -durability
    look for metal bodies and knobs, they just seem to last longer

    - external flash mount
    you can never have to much flash. use the camera flash until your skills improve then go external.

    -multi meter mode
    very handy once your skills improve

    -good in camera stabilization
    improves picture quality

    more to come

  2. #2
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    Additional singlespeed wallet (ziplock bag) to contain camera in jersey pocket. My point and shoot lasted half a season after getting infected with dirt. My bad.

  3. #3
    Misfit Psycles
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    Quote Originally Posted by nspace
    My point and shoot lasted half a season after getting infected with dirt. My bad.
    that's going around.
    beware.
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  4. #4
    No. Just No. Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by nspace
    My point and shoot lasted half a season after getting infected with dirt. My bad.
    Go see the doctor for a prescription, and things will hopefully return to normal soon enough. After that try to be more selective about the company you keep.

  5. #5
    humber river advocate
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    Quote Originally Posted by nspace
    Additional singlespeed wallet (ziplock bag) to contain camera in jersey pocket. My point and shoot lasted half a season after getting infected with dirt. My bad.
    i used to do that with my old point and shoot

    that's why i got this camera... olympus stylus 1030sw



    small all metal case, little wiper on the auto lense cover, waterproof, shock proof, freeze proof. real fast burst picture mode with a good panoramic mode. it is also easy to use with one hand while riding.


    for more involved pictures i have the canon g10. great camera (lot smaler than an slr), lots of features with cool picture stabilization/orientation. Has many of the same features as higher end slr's. will even take a special telephoto lens or wide angle (collectors item) if you can find it.




  6. #6
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    For a similar price to the G10, I went with Panasonic's DMC-LX3.
    The LX3 adds the following features that I find important for MTB picture taking:

    -wider angle lens than pretty much any other compact camera on the market without using add-on adaptors.

    -bright F2.0-2.8 aperture range.

    For me MTB pictures are all about scenery, so a wide (relatively speaking) angle lens is a must. With the 24mm wide lens on the LX3, pictures finally begin to take on a proper sense of scale. MTBing in Ontario tends to take place in shadowed woods, so a bright lens really adds flexibility to where you can take pictures. The only drawback to the LX3 would be the total lack of zoom. You can forget about taking pictures of cute trail-side animals unless they happen to be right at your feet.

  7. #7
    humber river advocate
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    i use the wide format setting to try to get more scale and auto bracket. though you can adjust your settings (have to play around with it). another aspect is to get the true colors of the leaves, plants, etc. the trade off of the olympus ease of use/toughness is that it washes out the pictures. plus the flash is not the strongest.

  8. #8
    MTB Rider
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    I wonder what BlackCanoeDog uses? I'm very impressed w/ the pics he's taken on his rides.
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  9. #9
    Keep pedaling...
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    Any small camera will work. It's the person who takes the photos, not the camera.

    If it's not small enough that you ALWAYS take it with you, then it's not small enough.

  10. #10
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    ********. The lag ina number of P&S cameras makes it near impossible to get the shot properly, not to mention the stupid settings that cameras coem with. If you are just after standard, run of the mill "remember the moment" shots, then any point and shoot will do. If you want to actually take a good picture, you need a good camera.

    The one I will be going with is the Panasonic LX3. 2.0 lense, better noise control then the Canon G10, full manual control. Prefocus on the area, set your shot exposure, and you *should* be able to catch killer shots.

    Its nowhere near my 1d Mark II though.
    Stuff.

  11. #11
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    Well, if you want those kinds of shots, then yeah you need a higher-end camera. I took these with my D40, which is just an inexpensive DSLR (which I would highly recommend).

    But 99% of the photos that I've seen here could all be taken with any camera. I took these all with either a cheap P&S or an iPhone (edit: except the first 5 - D40 again!). I think they turned out okay, and really that's all that matters.

  12. #12
    humber river advocate
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    yeah good cameras make a big difference, though you have to have deep pockets $$$$ the price of lenses are nuts!!! then you need all the other stuff. a small digital slr would be the ticket for under a grand.

    one thing i would like to try for my point and shot is this...

    http://www.creativepro.com/article/b...a-lens-peanuts

  13. #13
    bi-winning
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    Quote Originally Posted by singlesprocket
    i used to do that with my old point and shoot

    that's why i got this camera... olympus stylus 1030sw
    I like the idea of those cameras. However, many of the reviews I have read on the Olympus cameras seem to suggest that the image quality is not on par with non-waterproof camera of equal value from a company like Canon. Really, this makes sense, since you are paying for the toughness, but I don't know if I would be willing to trade some image quality for the extra durability. If I were to pay $300 for a camera, I'd want nice pictures in all situations - not just for riding. I generally don't drop my camera, fall on it, or soak it in water, but piece of mind is always nice.

    It does sound like the Stylus Tough 6000 has numerous improvements over previous models, so I think Olympus is taking steps in the right direction.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by singlesprocket
    yeah good cameras make a big difference, though you have to have deep pockets $$$$ the price of lenses are nuts!!! then you need all the other stuff. a small digital slr would be the ticket for under a grand.

    one thing i would like to try for my point and shot is this...

    http://www.creativepro.com/article/b...a-lens-peanuts
    i wouldn't think that this:

    is the kind of small and portable you were looking for.

    that effect is quite easy to emulate on the computer if thats what you're into.

    a moderate camera, say the canon SD1100, can be had for a really good price. so far under a grande that you can match it with photoshoppe or another (lesser expensive program) and still surpass most macgyver type solutions in terms of the final product.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by nogearshere
    i wouldn't think that this:

    is the kind of small and portable you were looking for.

    that effect is quite easy to emulate on the computer if thats what you're into.

    a moderate camera, say the canon SD1100, can be had for a really good price. so far under a grande that you can match it with photoshoppe or another (lesser expensive program) and still surpass most macgyver type solutions in terms of the final product.
    Photoshop and an SD 110 will not replace what an SLR and a bellows can do.
    However, since most are taking snapshots any durable camera will do. I would recommend the Olympus as well. I have seen them thrown at concrete from the sales reps directly. Image quality is more than enough for most everyone and the IQ of "Canon" cameras is much over-rated. And yes, I do shoot with Canon...
    www.mtbiker.ca

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  16. #16
    Misfit Psycles
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbgobie
    Photoshop and an SD 110 will not replace what an SLR and a bellows can do.
    sorry i got confused by the thread title smarty pants.
    i still say, for your average and sub-pro photog, photoshoppe will kick their ass every time.
    lenses and math, hard.
    mouse and help icons, easy.

    they really should teach photography in highschool...an alternative to art or typing or french...

    a long time ago in a galaxy far far away i was SOLD a canon...now, after bajillions in lensulary investments and the like i sit and watch my 30D become endangered knowing full well i just cant afford to change brands...
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  17. #17
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    They do teach photography in some high schools.
    It may be the P&S thread, but that doesn't mean they are magically the replacement of SLRs
    =)

    And it is tons easier to take a photo properly how you want it than photoshop it later. If life were so easy pro photographers would be worthless and photoshop artists would make all the big money, but it ain't so...

    Back to the topic, what most people who post photos here should learn is about exposure, and their camera settings that are found in the manual!

    Taking photos in the shadows of the forest in a sunny day can cause problems with exposure reading. Would suggest a spot metering on the rider you're trying to take a photo of, and pre focus of they are riding, especially with a p&s
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  18. #18
    Misfit Psycles
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbgobie
    Back to the topic, what most people who post photos here should learn is about exposure, and their camera settings that are found in the manual!

    Taking photos in the shadows of the forest in a sunny day can cause problems with exposure reading. Would suggest a spot metering on the rider you're trying to take a photo of, and pre focus of they are riding, especially with a p&s
    i for one (as an slr and p&s abuser) would really appreciate a 'for mtb'ing basics to photography' thread with tips like that in it...

    my manual is written in geek but i can understand what you wrote.
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  19. #19
    humber river advocate
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    the prefocus, spot meter setting works great. i just pick a tree where the rider will pass and focus on that. i would also turn on your cameras bracketing function. i had good results with that on. i also have a lecia d-lux 3 (which i think is the same as panasonic). great camera, but fragile, broken it once, gave it to gf.
    Last edited by singlesprocket; 05-13-2009 at 10:54 AM.

  20. #20
    Is it winter yet?
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    I'm heading to Buckwallow this weekend, and plan to take along our Panasonic TZ3. Nice little point-and-shoot camera. I'm rubbish as a photographer (and cyclist, for that matter), but BCD has inspired me.

  21. #21
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    Whoever said Photoshop can make up the difference between a Point and SHoot and an SLR should just stop talking right now. Thats like saying a geo metro can beat a porsche just by having it detailed properly. Photoshop can only assist an already decent image, it can't make up for a poor image to start. And make no mistake, if you are shooting high speed sports liek DH, you will NOT get a good image out of a point and shoot, unless you REALLy know what you are doing (which I do not.)

    The simple fact is that you need the right tool for the job, and for solid MTB shots NOTHING OUT THERE will beat a Dslr. Thats it. End. No other arguement.

    Yes you are take decent snapshots with a P&S, you can do that with any camera. But try catching a rider at full tilt...forget it.
    Stuff.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by dropmachine.com
    Whoever said Photoshop can make up the difference between a Point and SHoot and an SLR should just stop talking right now.
    i will, but i didn't, now whatever will we have the person who drops-in mid conversation (without actually reading the statement in question) do?

    Initial
    then
    Clarification

    Quote Originally Posted by dropmachine.com
    Photoshop can only assist an already decent image, it can't make up for a poor image to start.
    not exactly but you are mostly right.
    i CAN improve a poor image with photoshoppe, this is a fact.
    i CANNOT make it equivalent to a decent DSLR image, no.

    my point was that the difference between features and zig zags of a P&S (beyond lens and zoom quality) is a matter of dollars and sense. rather than drop a grande on a P&S buy an SD1100 (or such) for a hundred (plus) and use some of the 8-900$ remaining on photoshoppe...it (photoshoppe) will make up for those lost P&S features...

    if i wasn't clear it won't be the first time.

    now take any camera, even cheezie P&S's and they are light years beyond the abilities and comprehension of the majority of people that own them...never mind DSLR's...most DSLR's are bought at Future Shop and never leave AUTO!
    yes, i would put my P&S pics up against theirs for sure.

    Quote Originally Posted by dropmachine.com
    make no mistake, if you are shooting high speed sports liek DH, you will NOT get a good image out of a point and shoot, unless you REALLy know what you are doing (which I do not.)

    The simple fact is that you need the right tool for the job, and for solid MTB shots NOTHING OUT THERE will beat a Dslr. Thats it. End. No other arguement.

    Yes you are take decent snapshots with a P&S, you can do that with any camera. But try catching a rider at full tilt...forget it.
    you are spot on.

    sadly, that answer really ONLY matters when it matches the question asked...

    "point & shoot" camera mtb guide, he even used quotes for emphasis.
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  23. #23
    humber river advocate
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    what the heck!? /\ anyway, i've been exploring the macro function on the new camera. the first thing i learned in natural settings your lighting is very important. if given a choice i would go with natural. though it would be a good idea to have a tripod. (and keep using your bracket function)...

    example... first picture...




    third bracket...




    p.s. thats another flower on the trail.




    Quote Originally Posted by nogearshere
    i will, but i didn't, now whatever will we have the person who drops-in mid conversation (without actually reading the statement in question) do?

    Initial
    then
    Clarification


    not exactly but you are mostly right.
    i CAN improve a poor image with photoshoppe, this is a fact.
    i CANNOT make it equivalent to a decent DSLR image, no.

    my point was that the difference between features and zig zags of a P&S (beyond lens and zoom quality) is a matter of dollars and sense. rather than drop a grande on a P&S buy an SD1100 (or such) for a hundred (plus) and use some of the 8-900$ remaining on photoshoppe...it (photoshoppe) will make up for those lost P&S features...

    if i wasn't clear it won't be the first time.

    now take any camera, even cheezie P&S's and they are light years beyond the abilities and comprehension of the majority of people that own them...never mind DSLR's...most DSLR's are bought at Future Shop and never leave AUTO!
    yes, i would put my P&S pics up against theirs for sure.


    you are spot on.

    sadly, that answer really ONLY matters when it matches the question asked...

    "point & shoot" camera mtb guide, he even used quotes for emphasis.

  24. #24
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    P&S camera guide or not, its giving bad info
    A SLR in Auto still produces a better image than a p&S in any manual mode. For reasons way beyong some manual settings.

    The AF speed and sensor size just to name a couple that don't depend on knowing how to use your camera.

    The above flower pics are taken in the shade, you lose contrast. As you mentioned lighting is very important, if you can find flowers in the sun, or bring a reflector to perhaps backlight the flower you'd have a much better shot.

    I would take a cheap used abused slr with no photoshop any day over even the top end p&s camera any day.
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  25. #25
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    AGREED!

    Point and Shoots are great for shots of flowers by the side of the trail. Hell, a $100 camera can do that with no stress at all. But get things moving, start shooting action....and the point and shoot is done. Even the G10, or LX3 cannot get anywhere close to what the cheapest DSLR can do.

    BUT

    If you are going to buy a P&S, make sure you get one with full manual control. Then at least you can prefocus on a spot, and run a high shutter speed to try and catch the action. You shot will still likely be crap since P&S cameras tend to be crap at higher ISO setting (tons of noise), but its gonna be better then nothing.

    For me, I will be going with the LX3 for this very reason. Still, it cannot do what I need it to do for other shots. Just not gonna work out. Theres no way I could take the shots I do with a point and shoot and still get the same results.
    Stuff.

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