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  1. #1
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    Kenda Smallblock 8's - Opinions ?

    I just mounted up a set of these based on what I read about them being fast tires for dry conditions and semi road courses (ie Point to point races ) .
    After two trail rides Ive found them a bit of work to accelerate although they do carry speed well .
    On road and double track , they felt like I had to work a bit harder to maintain a constant cadence .
    I have 2.0's but volume wise they do mount wide . Visually they almost look like 2.2's or more . Both rides have been with about 28/30lbs psi .

    Can anyone else share their experiences with them ?

  2. #2
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    I have had them on the back almost all year in mostly dry dusty conditions. Recently went to the Slant 6 on the back. I have the Nevegals on the front. Here is what I have learned from my riding. I noticed that the SB8 have a tendency to slide off of roots and rocks more so then the Slant 6. I never had a problem with sliding out or losing grip but you can hear it pop off of roots and rocks. The Slant 6 seems to hold its own better in those conditions. I did have the SB8 on the front for awhile but was washing out too much on the dry dusty conditions we have had here in the midwest. I am not a real fast or technical rider, just a weekend warrior this is just my opinion.
    Still learning how to keep the rubber side down.

  3. #3
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    Wondering if I should have gone with the 1.95 's ?
    I have Nevegals (Stick E ) and they are slooowww .
    I only spoon them on for rocky Escarpment type riding such as
    Kelso and Hilton Falls because they offer great grip on the rocks .

  4. #4
    snowbound
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    I've got the 2.1's in the 29r version. They are great for racing in dry conditions. For every day riding though I don't use them as they don't grab well in the corners, and are just plain scary (to me) over wet roots.

  5. #5
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    fast on hardpack and in dry conditions. not so good in loose conditions, terrible shedding mud and fairly thin sidewalls.

    run them with low pressures if you want alot of grip with them. i liked them overall.. you just need to remember that they are a light hardpack tire.

  6. #6
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    If you spend a few minutes in the Wheels and Tires forum you will find these and every other tire has been discussed extensively. I have ridden SB8s, and I will share my personal experience. Huge disclaimer: I ride a single speed hard tail and stand nearly all the time. This matters, because where a seated full suspension rider is spinning up a hill, the tire may slip on a root. I might hop the back wheel over the same root and not notice the tireís inability to grip.

    In the Spring, I was riding 2.35 Nevegals with tubes, but i switched to 1.95 Nevegals with tubes, and I was happy. When things dired up a bit here in Ontario, I went with 2.1 SB8s with tubes. I was not very happy at first. They roll much faster than nevegals, and they are fine for me in rocks. But I couldnít keep the front end tracking in wet or dry. It skated for me. I switched the front to a Slant 6, and things got bettre. I went tubeless, and I am now happy. I stand to climb, and the SB8 on the back is working for me.

    I didnít try a SB8 tubeless on the front, that might have helped. But from what I can tell, they are much better tubeless. I suspect they conform better to the surface and you get more traction without sacrificing rolling resistance. I donít know if you ride in Toronto, but last night I cranked up the Millwood Hill in flats on a 32x19, and I didnít spin out. I also ride lost of wooden stunts, including climbing them uphill, and they are fine for me.

    So my summary is that a 2.1 Slant Six front and 2.1 Small Block Eight rear is working for me on my SS hard tail.

  7. #7
    namagomi
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    +no edge makes it easy for beginners
    - no edge to rail corner.

    +tiny lugs make less rolling resistance
    - tiny lugs are not good on rocks and roots

    +lots of little tiny lugs give better grip on dry
    - pack up with mud and drifts more in sand

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by electrik View Post
    +no edge makes it easy for beginners
    - no edge to rail corner.

    +tiny lugs make less rolling resistance
    - tiny lugs are not good on rocks and roots

    +lots of little tiny lugs give better grip on dry
    - pack up with mud and drifts more in sand
    Did you read that somewhere?

  9. #9
    namagomi
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satan2 View Post
    Did you read that somewhere?

  10. #10
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    I realize that these are dry condition tire .
    I wont be using them wet/loose conditions

  11. #11
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    Kenda's are notoriously slow and hard to pedal. It's probably the DTC but I could be wrong.
    I have a Nevgal and a Blue Groove on my bike and like them for riding in Durham/Glen Major/Walker Woods, but the rear tire does slip on roots when climbing. I've learned to adjust my climbing style and cadence, but sometimes it can't be helped and I'll slip on a root.

  12. #12
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    Craig, I had a set on my C'Dale 29er in the 2.1 size and found that they worked great if you put a little more pressure that usual in them. The drawback is that with the higher pressure they slip and slide all over roots, wet, and even a fine dust over hardpack. Once you hit sand and muck you might as well be riding slicks.

    I swapped them out to a Maxxis Ardent 2.25 in the front and a Crossmark 2.1 in the rear, which are full knobbies and feel as if they roll just as fast as the SB8's.
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  13. #13
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    I was running Nevegals last year and found them deathly slow, though I loved them at Hilton and for riding skinnies and rocks and other technical stuff. However, I found the compromise with speed too great. I began the season with SB8's and all was good until things got pretty baked. I found my front wheel wanting to wash out on me all the time. I could not trust these. I go a pair of Rocket Rons and they have proven to be an excellent all around tire. I was concerned with pinch flats pedaling up on and off rocks, but so far so good. I will probably throw the SB8's on the Joyride bike once the Tabletops wear out.

  14. #14
    namagomi
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    Quote Originally Posted by Braids View Post
    Kenda's are notoriously slow and hard to pedal. It's probably the DTC but I could be wrong.
    I have a Nevgal and a Blue Groove on my bike and like them for riding in Durham/Glen Major/Walker Woods, but the rear tire does slip on roots when climbing. I've learned to adjust my climbing style and cadence, but sometimes it can't be helped and I'll slip on a root.
    It's just softer rubber and larger knobs, like the nevegals, cause greater tire hysteresis since they squirm and deform more.

  15. #15
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    I never quite understood the target for the SB8. Maybe appropriate for "urban assault" or something like that. Lots of tiny lugs with little space between them is about the worst combination for rotational weight and traction.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by electrik View Post
    It's just softer rubber and larger knobs, like the nevegals, cause greater tire hysteresis since they squirm and deform more.
    Tire hysteresis? I don't understand the term in this context. Does it take more force to deform them than for them to return to normal? Or are you just trying to use a big word for squishy?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerdgirl View Post
    Tire hysteresis? I don't understand the term in this context. Does it take more force to deform them than for them to return to normal? Or are you just trying to use a big word for squishy?
    Maybe he means that the knobs are so large and soft that they don't have time to "rebound" between obstacles and they're in a constant state of "preload"?
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerdgirl View Post
    Tire hysteresis? I don't understand the term in this context. Does it take more force to deform them than for them to return to normal?
    There are losses going on with the large soft knobs, but hysteresis may not be the best/right word to use to describe it. When they're deformed, some of the applied energy is absorbed as heat, and is not all returned as a force deformation is removed. The damping of the rubber also slows down the speed at which it springs back, reducing the energy returned by the knobs since they're deformed quickly when the tire rolls and they don't bounce back quick enough to return the full amount of force when they leave the ground.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nerdgirl View Post
    Or are you just trying to use a big word for squishy?
    Hahaha!!!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by garage monster View Post
    Maybe he means that the knobs are so large and soft that they don't have time to "rebound" between obstacles and they're in a constant state of "preload"?
    If you and the missus are both at home, on separate computers, debating the meaning of "tire deformity" on-line, either you are the best engineers ever or you both need to get out and ride a little more.

    (sorry, had to be said...)
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  20. #20
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    IMHO, these are good tires for dry/hardpack conditions, which makes them an odd choice for this time of year. If I were you, I would save 'em for next summer
    Strava made me do it....

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by garage monster View Post
    Maybe he means that the knobs are so large and soft that they don't have time to "rebound" between obstacles and they're in a constant state of "preload"?
    I expect that they rebound too slowly to return all their energy during the trailing half of the contact patch, but have fully rebounded during the rest of the wheel rotation. Of course, if they complete the rebound when in free air, they don't return any energy to the ground/bike interactions.

  22. #22
    Evil Jr.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unglued View Post
    If you and the missus are both at home, on separate computers, debating the meaning of "tire deformity" on-line, either you are the best engineers ever or you both need to get out and ride a little more.

    (sorry, had to be said...)
    You should hear some of the conversations that go on around here.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by garage monster View Post
    You should hear some of the conversations that go on around here.
    I can imagine, especially once the MiniMonster arrives....
    Strava made me do it....

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickboers View Post
    I expect that they rebound too slowly to return all their energy during the trailing half of the contact patch, but have fully rebounded during the rest of the wheel rotation. Of course, if they complete the rebound when in free air, they don't return any energy to the ground/bike interactions.
    Gosh, there have to be about a bazillion factors that affect that too like tire pressure and surface composition.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by garage monster View Post
    Gosh, there have to be about a bazillion factors that affect that too like tire pressure and surface composition.
    Tube/tubeless, air/nitrogen/CO2...

    Should we make a huge chart? hehe

  26. #26
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    I ran an SB8 on the rear only of my Trek EX9 with a Nev on the front.

    It replaced the Nev I had on the rear.

    Noticably faster tire than the Nev, but narrower (in the same listed size 26 x 2.1).

    I wouldn't dare run the SB8 on the front for anything other than pavement.
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  27. #27
    namagomi
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerdgirl View Post
    Tire hysteresis? I don't understand the term in this context. Does it take more force to deform them than for them to return to normal? Or are you just trying to use a big word for squishy?
    Yes, what you place into the knobs does not return - some of it is lost to teh squishy. It is a big word though, not that size matters...

  28. #28
    namagomi
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unglued View Post
    If you and the missus are both at home, on separate computers, debating the meaning of "tire deformity" on-line, either you are the best engineers ever or you both need to get out and ride a little more.

    (sorry, had to be said...)
    Ahem...

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by serious View Post
    I never quite understood the target for the SB8. Maybe appropriate for "urban assault" or something like that. Lots of tiny lugs with little space between them is about the worst combination for rotational weight and traction.
    I kinda wonder how a semi-slick tire with decent side knobs would compare with the SB8. It should roll even faster than the SB8 while having a similar amount of traction in the climbs, but it'll handle better in turns and on off-camber trails.

  30. #30
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    I had a specialized Speed Master (I think?) tire on the back a decade ago. It had a 1" or so wide strip of tiny little diamonds and a row of SB8 sized knobs on either side. Super fast, lasted very long like a slick tire, and would corner ok on hardpack or pavement.

  31. #31
    wwg
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    I found the SB8 to be a slow despite its appearance. The Maxxis Crossmark is a far superior tire.
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  32. #32
    namagomi
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    Quote Originally Posted by wwg View Post
    I found the SB8 to be a slow despite its appearance. The Maxxis Crossmark is a far superior tire.
    Schawble racing ralphs also... are a good option for hard-pack

  33. #33
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    furious fred would fit

    your description as well.

    the fastest racing tire ever.

    SB8 were good a couple of years ago, because there was not much competition in that segment. however, these days there are many way better options with less rolling resistance and more traction.

    back to OP question/dilemma - SB8 have horrible cornering traction and require a lot of finesse and skills to power them through corners. for just riding around - they are good only as long as it does not get wet and/or muddy.

    definitely not appropriate for current season...

    just don't understand comment that they are good for beginners because there is no side knob, whatever electrik meant...... even intrawebz couldnt help.

    Quote Originally Posted by nickboers View Post
    I had a specialized Speed Master (I think?) tire on the back a decade ago. It had a 1" or so wide strip of tiny little diamonds and a row of SB8 sized knobs on either side. Super fast, lasted very long like a slick tire, and would corner ok on hardpack or pavement.

  34. #34
    namagomi
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    Quote Originally Posted by osokolo View Post
    your description as well.

    the fastest racing tire ever.

    SB8 were good a couple of years ago, because there was not much competition in that segment. however, these days there are many way better options with less rolling resistance and more traction.

    back to OP question/dilemma - SB8 have horrible cornering traction and require a lot of finesse and skills to power them through corners. for just riding around - they are good only as long as it does not get wet and/or muddy.

    definitely not appropriate for current season...

    just don't understand comment that they are good for beginners because there is no side knob, whatever electrik meant...... even intrawebz couldnt help.
    To clarify - They're a good tire to learn on because the turn-in is predictable and the point where they let loose is progressive. This is something common on beginner tire or any round-profile tire.


    More "advanced" tires have a square profile on the corners, this type offers superior edge to corner with but takes more skill to use properly since the bicycle and wheel must be leaned over to the right angle. This requires a bit more confidence/skill.


  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by osokolo View Post
    just don't understand comment that they are good for beginners because there is no side knob, whatever electrik meant...... even intrawebz couldnt help.
    Tires with a very rounded profile and little to no definition of edge knobs have very predictable behaviour when leaning over at successively higher angles. For new riders this can sometimes be easier to learn from intuitively than a tire with a more pronounced row of edge blocks that will likely bite better on many types of terrain, but also have a more sudden (and subjectively less predictable) breakaway point once the tire is pushed beyond the limits of its traction.

    I'd say give the new riders better grip for the most help possible and let them fly, but as a learning tool I can understand where electrik is coming from conceptually.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by electrik View Post
    To clarify - They're a good tire to learn on because the turn-in is predictable and the point where they let loose is progressive. This is something common on beginner tire or any round-profile tire.


    More "advanced" tires have a square profile on the corners, this type offers superior edge to corner with but takes more skill to use properly since the bicycle and wheel must be leaned over to the right angle. This requires a bit more confidence/skill.

    So you would rather have a beginner on a tire that has less grip and washes out sooner than a tire that has more grip and washes out later?

    Weird.

    I would rather give beginner as much grip as possible and let them gain skills and confidence to ride less grippy tires.

    It takes less skill to ride bike with more lateral grip, fast.

    It takes more skill to ride semi slick or slick tires, faster.

    SB8 was considered a "pro" tire a couple of years ago.

    Panaracer Fire is your typical beginner tire, in my case as well.

    The difference between the two is obvious.

    It is not a rocket science.

    Edit: BTW Spesh Renegade is a very round profile tire, as well as Schwalbe Furious Fred. No square side knobs. Yet both are pure racing tires, unlike your general description. But what do I know. I only try 5-6 different sets every year in my eternal search for the perfect tire. I have a set of SB8 for sale. Do you have a beginner that I can sell them to for cheap?


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  37. #37
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    I've never ridden a SM8 so I don't know how it feels like and won't comment on it.

    However, I'm with electrik with regards to beginner tires. I started riding around 20 years ago on Ritchey Z-Max tires and continue to ride them to this day. They're a full knobby tire with a rounded profile and moderate amount of grip, they roll fairly fast and give you lots of warning before breaking traction in a predictable manner. They were great tires to learn on since they had enough grip to handle most situations and the rider had plenty of warning before they broke loose so he can learn how to push the limits and recover in time without crashing too often or badly.

    If I start leaning too far the tires will start chattering or feel loose well before they break traction so that I know I have to back off before I get dumped, and usually had the time to do so. And once I got used to that feeling I gained the confidence & skill to push them on the turns even when they felt loose, knowing that I still had a bit of margin left and also how to recover if they did let go.

    With my Tioga Factory XC's or some of the newer tires I've ridden, that warning zone is a lot smaller. They have a lot more traction which lets a beginner rider go faster easier, but the flipside of that is he can get in way over his head a lot easier as well. There's not much of a "safety zone" between traction and no traction, a less experienced rider won't be able to catch the warnings in time so he's going to take some harsh falls at higher speeds. That's gonna hurt, and it also makes it harder to learn how to corner and recover from skids. After a few bad falls you probably won't want to push the tires near their limits so your cornering skills don't progress and you don't really learn how to control the tires near their traction limits to get the most out of them.

  38. #38
    namagomi
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    Quote Originally Posted by osokolo View Post
    So you would rather have a beginner on a tire that has less grip and washes out sooner than a tire that has more grip and washes out later?

    Weird.

    I would rather give beginner as much grip as possible and let them gain skills and confidence to ride less grippy tires.

    It takes less skill to ride bike with more lateral grip, fast.

    It takes more skill to ride semi slick or slick tires, faster.

    SB8 was considered a "pro" tire a couple of years ago.

    Panaracer Fire is your typical beginner tire, in my case as well.

    The difference between the two is obvious.

    It is not a rocket science.

    Edit: BTW Spesh Renegade is a very round profile tire, as well as Schwalbe Furious Fred. No square side knobs. Yet both are pure racing tires, unlike your general description. But what do I know. I only try 5-6 different sets every year in my eternal search for the perfect tire. I have a set of SB8 for sale. Do you have a beginner that I can sell them to for cheap?


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    Wrong, you ride your bicycle with better lateral grip faster through a corner than the person without it(they are skidding allover the trail ).

    Despite inferior cornering on the trail - It is better to recommend a beginner use a round-profile tire because it is very predictable when it slides out and easy to control. Square profile tires will abruptly slide out and you'll be in more trouble or the beginner will simply state the tire "sucks" because they aren't leaning the wheel and cutting with the edge.

    Why pick a square profile with a distinct edge?

    Well, you wouldn't try to Super-G on a classic x-country ski, would you?

  39. #39
    snowbound
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    SB8's are a terrible tire to learn on. As osokolo said, they were considered a pro tire a few years ago.
    You wouldn't give a beginner skier world cup level ski's to learn on. I've found with the SB8's there is very little warning before they let go - and once they do, it is very difficult to recover from. Also, I think we have all agreed that they are suitable only in specific conditions - dry hard pack.
    Nevegals, Racing Ralphs, Maxis Ignitor - all tires I currently use are better suited to beginner riders.
    That being said - a friend of mine picked up an "entry level" Giant that came with SB8's. I have no idea why they would spec a bike like that with those tires.

  40. #40
    Evil Jr.
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    Oddly enough, my first "real" MTB (a Steve Bauer model from Crappy Tire) came spec'ed with Tioga City Slickers. Not knowing any better, I rode those tires until they were threadbare. Talk about a great beginner tire!



    When I finally scratched enough paper-route money together, I put a Panaracer Smoke on the rear (typical Hoser snow tire strategy, ). Wow, traction!

    When I once again put together enough money, I put a Panaracer Dart on the front. Wow, cornering!

    I'm not sure I'd recommend the same learning curve for a beginner but it sure tought me a lot!
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  41. #41
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    again, you are stating your

    opinions or personal preferences as facts. it is very misleading to those that don't know this about you.

    Quote Originally Posted by electrik View Post
    Wrong, you ride your bicycle with better lateral grip faster through a corner than the person without it(they are skidding allover the trail ).
    not necessarily accurate. kenda nevegals have more lateral grip, but specialized renegade are much faster in corners when dry and rocket rons are faster in corners when dry or wet - both compared to kenda nevegal.

    this is my personal experience.



    Despite inferior cornering on the trail - It is better to recommend a beginner use a round-profile tire because it is very predictable when it slides out and easy to control. Square profile tires will abruptly slide out and you'll be in more trouble or the beginner will simply state the tire "sucks" because they aren't leaning the wheel and cutting with the edge.
    the title of this thread is: Kenda Smallblock 8's - Opinions ?

    just a gentle reminder. we are not discussing round vs square shaped tires, though it would be a very interesting topic. i suggest you start a new thread and then we can beat up on it. here - we are discussing SB8 and i was challenging your suggestion that they are a good beginner tire. SB8 do not slide out in predictable or controllable manner. they just slide out very easily and can not be controlled. that is why they require a lot of skill to take advantage of their low rolling resistance in corners, by shifting weight around and knowing the exact limits of the tire. another good example is bontrager xdx - a bit bigger knobs, but similar concept. very round profile. when you lose them - there is no correction. you are gone...

    @aerius: same reminder - however - on a tangent i agree with your preference re: round profile tire with lots of traction - is better than a tire with "square shape" and big side lugs... for this discussion - let's keep it on SB8 - opinions.



    Why pick a square profile with a distinct edge?

    Well, you wouldn't try to Super-G on a classic x-country ski, would you?
    tommy had a much better question in my opinion, related to this topic. why give a racing "team ski" to a beginner skier. even today - you will still see many a racer using SB8, though there are other much better tires in that segment.

    i personally prefer the round profile. had a lot of love for racing ralphs, but now feel that for example specialized renegade will give me 95% of the cornering traction that racing ralphs offer, and be more predictable and better rolling tire in dry to sprinkle wet conditions. in my age group at Paul's 100k, 2nd and 3rd placed raced on renegade and furious freds, respectively. can't remember what the winner raced on, but he would have won on kenda nevegals anyway. he's got the motor...

    good discussion, just try to refrain from serving personal opinions and preferences as "facts". may be the time for another tire discussion thread... just to be ready for the next season...

    interested in hearing opinions and comparisons on

    maxxis ikon
    maxxis aspen
    conti race kings
    furious freds
    rocket rons
    racing ralphs

    etc... any "surprise" good tires from last season?

    let's leave it for the new thread though...
    Last edited by osokolo; 09-22-2011 at 07:40 AM.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by tommy View Post
    That being said - a friend of mine picked up an "entry level" Giant that came with SB8's. I have no idea why they would spec a bike like that with those tires.
    A friend of mine who's just getting into riding picked up an entry-level Giant (probably the same model) with the SB8s on it. That's even more insane down here considering the distinct lack of dry hardpack. Or dry anything for that matter. The SB8 is definitely not suited to wet rocks, roots and moss. When we upgraded him to 2.35 ST Minions his riding improved instantly. Traction definitely trumps low rolling resistance here.

  43. #43
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    makes a lot of sense to me

    manufacturers halfheartedly try to match the performance of the frame/components with tires. in many cases, they have contracts with specific tire manufacturers and have to use their products across the line of bikes they make.

    i suspect, sometimes they have more stock on a certain model tire and they just try to get it out through the door, regardless of the intended use...

    Quote Originally Posted by L. Ron Hoover View Post
    A friend of mine who's just getting into riding picked up an entry-level Giant (probably the same model) with the SB8s on it. That's even more insane down here considering the distinct lack of dry hardpack. Or dry anything for that matter. The SB8 is definitely not suited to wet rocks, roots and moss. When we upgraded him to 2.35 ST Minions his riding improved instantly. Traction definitely trumps low rolling resistance here.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by osokolo View Post
    manufacturers halfheartedly try to match the performance of the frame/components with tires. in many cases, they have contracts with specific tire manufacturers and have to use their products across the line of bikes they make.

    i suspect, sometimes they have more stock on a certain model tire and they just try to get it out through the door, regardless of the intended use...
    No argument here.

    In their defence, it wouldn't make sense for manufacturers to try to match tires to regions anyway. Far to much variability out there for that to be economical.

  45. #45
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    I'm with Osokolo on having a more aggressive tire for beginners. My first bike many years ago came with thinner 1.9 something or other. I ran into a very experienced rider, and he recommended the Hutchison Alligators. These were a great beginner tire and ran them for a couple of years. Offered great traction, mud clearance, good cornering, but were not the fastest. They had good grip on rocks and logs. Putting a beginner on something like the SB8 would be doing them a disservice. The only reason I did not eat dirt several times, is because of my years of riding. These tires let go with little warning and would be a bit dangerous if you don't have a good feel of what is going on, or are not aware of how fast to approach turns and different terrains. With the ground baked unto powder, these tires were a menace this summer. I have Nevegals, some Intense tires I can't remember the name of, and now the Rocket Rons. I don't like changing tires too much and I am liking the Rocket Rons for an all around tire. When you do lean on the RR's they have very good bite and could really send an inexperienced rider for a tumble. However, I don't think a newbie would be leaning this hard at speed in the first place. At least they shouldn't be. I'm all for big tires with lots of grip for beginners. There are too many subtleties to riding all kinds of obstacles and terrains that they don't know. No point in adding another obstacle in a hard to handle tire.

  46. #46
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    I wonder if beginners know how much thought we put into their riding?
    Please enjoy seeing this terrible collection of me - something wonderful is about to happy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by garage monster View Post
    I wonder if beginners know how much thought we put into their riding?
    My noob buddy knows. He was really struggling with fairly simple trail features with the SB8s and once I got him to buy Minions he really felt a difference and his riding improved markedly. So there's probably some good coming from it.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by L. Ron Hoover View Post
    My noob buddy knows. He was really struggling with fairly simple trail features with the SB8s and once I got him to buy Minions he really felt a difference and his riding improved markedly. So there's probably some good coming from it.
    LOL! I'd like to think that all I have to do is change tires to get better! I bought a new Cannondale Flash in Jan that came with SB8's. Thankfully it taught me to change tires for conditions. I have Mtn King's for rain/mud, and I run the SB8's when it's dry, Doesn't make me ANY faster!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by secret agent View Post
    When you do lean on the RR's they have very good bite and could really send an inexperienced rider for a tumble. However, I don't think a newbie would be leaning this hard at speed in the first place. At least they shouldn't be. I'm all for big tires with lots of grip for beginners. There are too many subtleties to riding all kinds of obstacles and terrains that they don't know. No point in adding another obstacle in a hard to handle tire.
    One word: teenagers. I've seen enough newbie teens ride with complete disregard for self-preservation and they will take a RR or other such tire right to the limits and beyond. I still remember my first time on WTB Velociraptors when I was that age, they kept gripping so I kept going faster & faster till I high-sided the bike and got creamed. Of course teenagers heal pretty fast so they can afford to take a bunch of crashes.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by garage monster View Post
    I wonder if beginners know how much thought we put into their riding?
    Well, as a n00b, I appreciate all the hard work you folks put into picking my tires! I have a 2.1" SB8 on the rear, but switching the front to a Slant 6 was a good move for me, I do not have the expertise to rail the bike at high speed on SB8s front and rear.

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