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  1. #1
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    Joyride 150 advice

    Next week is reading week so I'm planning to take a day and do a father/daughter trip to Joyride. The daughter will just be a spectator, she doesn't ride but wants to see the place. We've never been there, never ridden a bike park.
    I see from the website that they don't open till 3.

    I want to learn to do drops properly, do the pump track and of course just ride.
    What bike should I take? I usually ride a 29er. I have a rigid 29er, hardtail 29er, hardtail 26er and a singlespeed hardtail 26er.
    Will it matter which one?

  2. #2
    Lemmy Rules!
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    I don't think it matters too much. For the pump track, a rigid 26er with the seat dropped is fun, but then again, if you are there to improve your skills generally speaking, why not pick the bike you would normally ride in the great outdoors?

    I have ridden Joyride on my Misfit Dissent and had a great time, but I have recently invested in a used dirt jumper bike, which is just a hoot on the jump lines and pump track.
    Strava made me do it....

  3. #3
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    Probably one of the 26ers. Shorter chainstays work better on the pumptrack and jumps. You also want the saddle dropped close to the tire to let you pump the pumptrack, and any jump lines you might hopefully try too.

  4. #4
    Evil Jr.
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    If you have room for only one bike, bring the SS 26er (less stuff to break off when you bail - and you will... ) Throw some platform pedals on it too if you have some (and bring shin guards if you have 'em). This will be great for the pump track and the skinnies.

    If you have room for two bikes, bring your regular 29er too and leave it as is. This will be great for the XC loop.

    Have fun!
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  5. #5
    snowbound
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    $15 and you can rent a DJ there - perfect for the pump track, and everything else (just no rentals in the foam pit).

  6. #6
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    Accommodation recommendations? I see they have a promotion with the Hilton nearby.... Looks good. Any comments on that?

    I would like to go Easter weekend and ride Saturday and Sunday. What time of the day is best?

    I would like to work on improving jump skills. I have a strong XC background, but I need to work on getting comfortable with bigger jumps. Any advice on how to approach that at Joyride?

    I see on the Joyride website you can purchase one-on-one instruction. Has anyone tried it and what did you think?

  7. #7
    That's not a W
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    Hi Ray, I've stayed at the Hilton before... it was okay. Nothing special, no big complaints that I remember.

    Joyride typically isn't very busy for the first couple of hours after it opens on the weekends. Easter weekend could be different though. Not sure about later in the evening, I never make it that long.

    As for jumping: I say rent a dirt jumper for sure, start on the pumptrack since it's a similar motion and a good warm up, then move to the smallest jump line and take your time going to the bigger jump line(s)... get really comfortable being in the air on the little jumps before you move on. When you do get to the big one, don't be afraid to just roll the jumps the first couple of times to get a feel for them.

    I think instruction is a great idea if you're keen. I improved a lot at each of the Women's Weekends where there was excellent instruction. I don't know who does Joyride's regular one-on-one but I'd suggest it's worth a try.

    I also think it might be a good idea just to google how to jump, watch some videos etc.

    Have fun!!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ray.vermette View Post
    I would like to work on improving jump skills. I have a strong XC background, but I need to work on getting comfortable with bigger jumps. Any advice on how to approach that at Joyride?
    Do you want to be more comfortable jumping things while riding XC trails, or riding dirt jumps?

    Start in the morning when they open. If it's getting really busy after 3-4 hours, go rest, grab some lunch and come back mid-late afternoon. Pump tracks and jumping work a lot of muscles you may not be using much, and you could probably use a break. When I go I usually ride the big jumps for 5-6 hours, and I'm sore for days.

  9. #9
    Evil Jr.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ray.vermette View Post
    I see on the Joyride website you can purchase one-on-one instruction. Has anyone tried it and what did you think?
    I haven't personally used the one-on-one instruction (though, arguably, I should...) but I've seen small groups of kids being led by one of the BMX instructors and you can see the improvement in the kids almost immediately. It's remarkable.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickboers View Post
    Do you want to be more comfortable jumping things while riding XC trails, or riding dirt jumps?
    Dirt jumps, tabletops, gaps, bigger drops... the kinda stuff you might find on an intermediate downhill run at a dirt park like Sugarloaf.

    I think I'll show up when they open at 10 and try to put in a solid 3 hours. I'm out of shape from not riding all winter, so I might not make it to noon.

    Any suggestions on what to do apres-ride? Things to see? Places to eat?

  11. #11
    Evil Jr.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ray.vermette View Post
    I think I'll show up when they open at 10 and try to put in a solid 3 hours. I'm out of shape from not riding all winter, so I might not make it to noon.

    Any suggestions on what to do apres-ride? Things to see? Places to eat?
    A word of warning: the palms of your hands are probably going to take a real beating. If you're planning on going a second day, bringing moleskin is a really good idea.

    There are tons of great places to eat all around Joyride. In fact, we had some great congee at 7 and Kennedy on Family Day. For a quick lunch, we often just invade Foody Mart (a giant Asian supermarket just down McCowan) and hit the lunch counter. Historic Unionville is just around the corner too if pub fare is more up your alley.
    Please enjoy seeing this terrible collection of me - something wonderful is about to happy.

  12. #12
    snowbound
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    Quote Originally Posted by ray.vermette View Post

    Any suggestions on what to do apres-ride? Things to see? Places to eat?
    For food, I like the Dutchess on main st. Markham
    The Duchess of Markham
    If you haven't been to Unionville - people like it for the pretty little shops, go there and eat at Jakes, Jakes On Main

    What else to do on a father/daughter trip...Scarborough bluffs are pretty spectacular, the Toronto Zoo, and of course a bit futher into Toronto, the science centre.

  13. #13
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    Thanks for the tips!

    @slash5: sorry for hijacking your thread. You can have it back now. lol

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