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Thread: I want a dog

  1. #1
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    That's not a W
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    Do it!!

    I love that video! Here's another awesome internet famous trail dog:


  3. #3
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    I love dogs, own two, but would be very reluctant to let them run loose on a trail while I rode, for fear of encountering other riders, both for the safety of the dogs, and other trail users. If the dog bolts, runs away, or gets in the way of another rider, it is virtually impossible to control the dog by any means other than voice commands. Teaching the dog to respond to voice commands alone, every time, on a fast-paced ride where there are lots of sights, sounds and smells to distract it is no easy feat.

    That's not to say people should not ride with their dogs like this. I know several awesome trail dogs, but folks should recognise that it takes a ton of training and patience to have a dog out on the trail with you. YOu're not gonna go out on the trail with your new dog right after you get home from the pound and be able to do what these videos show.

    There should almost be a disclaimer to this effect at the end of the videos if they are out there in the public domain on YOutube because there is always that one person utterly devoid of common sense who won't understand this.

    But yeah, having a dog with whom I could ride like this would be awesome....
    Strava made me do it....

  4. #4
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    Buzz kill!

    Valid points, of course but it could be fun to have a thread celebrating how awesome trail dogs can be instead of focusing on the negative possibilities.

    As Unglued knows, we have trail dogs-in-training so they are no where near the ability of Kaia or Lily. But we know that and take it into account when planning rides with them by taking them riding on unpopular trails or during quiet times and never on group rides. It helps that it's winter so other trail users are going slower in general than summer. We hope they will be excellent trail dogs eventually but they are not there yet. They are also in obedience training.

    I am thinking about getting one of those leash contraptions BCD has to attach to the bike so I can take them on busier trails as the weather gets warmer.

    If anyone has other tips to train a dog to be a great trail dog, I'd be happy to hear them.

  5. #5
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    Ughhh, I've almost been seriously injured by irresponsible owners bringing unleashed dogs into the Don. I've also come very close to killing a dog, same reason...

    Unleashed dogs do not belong on mountain bike trails. Period.

    The only time an unleashed dog is safe on a mountain bike trail is if there are no other cyclists.

    Blind corners, fast running, quiet animal, hills, roots, unpredictable line availability...

    Ya, I'm a buzz kill, but worse are selfish *******s who think it's reasonable to threaten the safety of others and their dogs to make a cool video...

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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnikcdn View Post
    Ughhh, I've almost been seriously injured by irresponsible owners bringing unleashed dogs into the Don. I've also come very close to killing a dog, same reason...

    Unleashed dogs do not belong on mountain bike trails. Period.

    The only time an unleashed dog is safe on a mountain bike trail is if there are no other cyclists.

    Blind corners, fast running, quiet animal, hills, roots, unpredictable line availability...

    Ya, I'm a buzz kill, but worse are selfish *******s who think it's reasonable to threaten the safety of others and their dogs to make a cool video...
    Just to play devil's advocate for all those selfish ********s, if you are not riding within 100% control while out on the trails, you might want want to keep the name calling to a minimum. This is one of the first cardinal rules of mountain biking, if you have any fear of an unpredictable trail user around a blind corner, in a technical section, or encountering one an a downhill perhaps you should slow down (even come to a stop, I do it all the time). This isn't limited to dogs. It could be horses, children, bird watchers or other mountain bikers with limited skill sets. Approaching any of these trail users without due caution could potentially put all parties at risk. You could also just be approaching ******s as well, they come in all forms.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor View Post
    Just to play devil's advocate for all those selfish ********s, if you are not riding within 100% control while out on the trails, you might want want to keep the name calling to a minimum. This is one of the first cardinal rules of mountain biking, if you have any fear of an unpredictable trail user around a blind corner, in a technical section, or encountering one an a downhill perhaps you should slow down (even come to a stop, I do it all the time). This isn't limited to dogs. It could be horses, children, bird watchers or other mountain bikers with limited skill sets. Approaching any of these trail users without due caution could potentially put all parties at risk. You could also just be approaching ******s as well, they come in all forms.
    I do ride under control. I'm a human being with a conscience.

    You can't ask a dog to do so...

    There is no equivalency.

  8. #8
    Dorkimus Prime
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    Both of my children, from about 3 on, have walked off leash in the Dundas Valley. A well trained dog would be much likelier to get out of the way of a fast moving rider than a small child...
    "I love being on a bike. It helps me feel free. I get it from my dad", by Guillaume Blanchet

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biggie View Post
    Both of my children, from about 3 on, have walked off leash in the Dundas Valley. A well trained dog would be much likelier to get out of the way of a fast moving rider than a small child...
    Well trained... likelier... and, most importantly, according to you. Why should I trust a stranger's dog? Why should I trust the stranger who says their dog is harmless?

    An animal is still an animal. It will be far harder to see, faster, quieter and far less predictable. Even a well trained dog will bolt if it sees a wild animal to chase.

    Your kids will likely be brightly dressed and accompanied by at least one brightly dressed adult. They do not move very fast... Hopefully you're watching them.

    Come on people... You cannot say that allowing dogs to run on bike paths without a leash is safe... as much as you want to, as much fun as it would be, please, don't!

    At least use a leash...

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    Ah....another my view of trail use is better then your view of trail use thread.

    Next week we discuss banning small children from trails.
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    Depression...can eat a sack of manure and die.

  11. #11
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    On on hand I can appreciate that some people make very little attempts to reasonably share the trails with fellow trail users. That can include adults, children, dogs, etc. I don't mind sharing the trails with any of them and don't expect free and instantaneous passage or right of way, but I do appreciate it when any combinations of the above engage in any actions that let people pass each other in a safe manner without undue delay, whether oncoming or overtaking. Dogs may have little sense of that, but if their handlers take reasonable actions within a reasonable period of time that's good enough for me.

    The million dollar question in this discussion is what trails are being discussed are "mountain bike trails"? To the best of my knowledge these are few and far between, mostly as privately owned facilities which have their own posted rules concerning different types of trail users (or whether the use is strictly limited to mountain biking). All other trails are typically on public land, not restricted specifically to mountain bike use, and therefore not truly "mountain bike trails" in any exclusive sense. While one may expect that a fellow mountain biker is focused primarily on the mountain bike experience, that may not always be true. They may be out primarily to share time with their dog, and just happen to be riding rather than walking.

    Maybe mountain bikers are the most visible and perhaps even most numerous type of user on some trails, but that doesn't necessarily impart priority in their use.

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    I really don't like putting absolutes on anything.

    There are responsible trail users and irresponsible trail users. At times there are responsible trail users that act irresponsibly and vice versa.

    Due caution needs to be exercised by all users at all times. This could include keeping a dog off a certain trail, or slowing your speed while cresting a blind roller. It could mean slowing while approaching a family out for hike, or getting off your bike and allowed a equestrian to pass. It certainly includes having a dog that responds to verbal commands. I've seen a number of working dogs that I'd trust more to do what's told of them in the presence of squirrel than I would a mountain biker enthusiastically getting back to the parking lot for that beer.

    I think if everyone thought more about the experiences of the people around them and how their actions influenced that, we'd all get along way better. Even then, crap would happen (you know how many times I've had oh $hitz moments with deer in Dundas Valley).

    There are irresponsible trail users in every shape and form unfortunately. Stroking one user group with a black and white brush does no good.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by VVagabond View Post
    Do it!!

    I love that video! Here's another awesome internet famous trail dog:

    OMG, that was incredible! I love it when the guy is walking the bike and Lily is basically running circles around him. Talk about anxious.
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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor View Post
    I really don't like putting absolutes on anything.

    There are responsible trail users and irresponsible trail users. At times there are responsible trail users that act irresponsibly and vice versa.

    Due caution needs to be exercised by all users at all times. This could include keeping a dog off a certain trail, or slowing your speed while cresting a blind roller. It could mean slowing while approaching a family out for hike, or getting off your bike and allowed a equestrian to pass. It certainly includes having a dog that responds to verbal commands. I've seen a number of working dogs that I'd trust more to do what's told of them in the presence of squirrel than I would a mountain biker enthusiastically getting back to the parking lot for that beer.

    I think if everyone thought more about the experiences of the people around them and how their actions influenced that, we'd all get along way better. Even then, crap would happen (you know how many times I've had oh $hitz moments with deer in Dundas Valley).

    There are irresponsible trail users in every shape and form unfortunately. Stroking one user group with a black and white brush does no good.
    I find dogs on the trail to be much more predictable then most humans.
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    Depression...can eat a sack of manure and die.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor View Post
    I really don't like putting absolutes on anything.

    There are responsible trail users and irresponsible trail users. At times there are responsible trail users that act irresponsibly and vice versa.

    Due caution needs to be exercised by all users at all times. This could include keeping a dog off a certain trail, or slowing your speed while cresting a blind roller. It could mean slowing while approaching a family out for hike, or getting off your bike and allowed a equestrian to pass. It certainly includes having a dog that responds to verbal commands. I've seen a number of working dogs that I'd trust more to do what's told of them in the presence of squirrel than I would a mountain biker enthusiastically getting back to the parking lot for that beer.

    I think if everyone thought more about the experiences of the people around them and how their actions influenced that, we'd all get along way better. Even then, crap would happen (you know how many times I've had oh $hitz moments with deer in Dundas Valley).

    There are irresponsible trail users in every shape and form unfortunately. Stroking one user group with a black and white brush does no good.
    That "beer" comment was directed at me, wasn't it?
    Strava made me do it....

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor View Post
    I've seen a number of working dogs that I'd trust more to do what's told of them in the presence of squirrel than I would a mountain biker enthusiastically getting back to the parking lot for that beer.
    Hey..Squirrel.

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    Depression...can eat a sack of manure and die.

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    sputnikcdn,

    Please change your attitude, one like that will make no friends with other trail users. At many trail systems mountain bikers need more friends.

    Banning other trail users is not the answer, so long as they are not destructive to the trail.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unglued View Post
    That "beer" comment was directed at me, wasn't it?
    No, not directly. Had I been targeting you I would have mentioned black-out profanity laced tirade.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor View Post
    No, not directly. Had I been targeting you I would have mentioned black-out profanity laced tirade.
    Oh come on. That only happened 3 or 4 times. In the same ride.
    Strava made me do it....

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    I think I'd like an Airedale. And can you believe more snow is on the way?!
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by bishskate View Post
    And can you believe more snow is on the way?!
    Excellent.

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    Depression...can eat a sack of manure and die.

  22. #22
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    I want a dog

    A dog is a great idea. I got into this sport because of my dog. All I say is "bike ride" and he's jumping all over. Right now (living in Canada) he doesn't understand the bike trainer as he isn't running and I'm going nowhere lol. To add to the discussion, as a dog owner, I myself don't trust all dogs off leash. But I also have my dog off leash while we ride, he listens to my commands and is actually more focused on the trail then me. He also wears a bear bell to warn oncoming trail users of his presence in times where he is ahead of me ( usually the first hour or so). To continue on the positive, I find most people are happy to see him and want him to stop for more water breaks than needed to just give him a pat. Dogs, well trained, are great riding pals... They never complain or bail last minute. They'll even let you share their post ride beer!

  23. #23
    I build my own.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnikcdn View Post
    Well trained... likelier... and, most importantly, according to you. Why should I trust a stranger's dog? Why should I trust the stranger who says their dog is harmless?

    An animal is still an animal. It will be far harder to see, faster, quieter and far less predictable. Even a well trained dog will bolt if it sees a wild animal to chase.

    Your kids will likely be brightly dressed and accompanied by at least one brightly dressed adult. They do not move very fast... Hopefully you're watching them.

    Come on people... You cannot say that allowing dogs to run on bike paths without a leash is safe... as much as you want to, as much fun as it would be, please, don't!

    At least use a leash...
    I hit a bear once. I'm fine with dogs on the trails.
    I have a device that can access the total knowledge of man. I use it to look at pictures of cats and argue with strangers.

  24. #24
    Maddog
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    I got a dog 7 years ago. A vizsla (Hungarian pointer). Tons of energy and needs to be run off leash. I found an area where people hardly went outside of our town and let her run off leash. Thought "hey it would be cool to mountain bike with her" so I started making trails in this area. Then other people started making trails in this area. When I ride on the trails, she does circles around me for an hour and a half. Mostly now I ride these dog trails with other people.

  25. #25
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    I won't say any more than this, because obviously I'm in the minority in this.

    I'll repeat - unleashed dogs do not belong on mountain bike trails. Period.

    Dog owners have all kinds of other places to take their dogs to run. It's not safe to have an unleashed dog on a mountain bike trail.

    Edit... to the people who sent me personal messages - thanks, but I know how to ride a bike. And safely.

    Taking an unleashed dog in a mountain bike trail, unless you know you're alone, is an inherently selfish act.

    I'm out...

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