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Thread: I want a dog

  1. #1
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    I want a dog

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  2. #2
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    Do it!!

    I love that video! Here's another awesome internet famous trail dog:

    <iframe width='500' height='281' src='http://www.pinkbike.com/v/embed/227689/?colors=C80000' allowfullscreen frameborder='0'></iframe>

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    I love dogs, own two, but would be very reluctant to let them run loose on a trail while I rode, for fear of encountering other riders, both for the safety of the dogs, and other trail users. If the dog bolts, runs away, or gets in the way of another rider, it is virtually impossible to control the dog by any means other than voice commands. Teaching the dog to respond to voice commands alone, every time, on a fast-paced ride where there are lots of sights, sounds and smells to distract it is no easy feat.

    That's not to say people should not ride with their dogs like this. I know several awesome trail dogs, but folks should recognise that it takes a ton of training and patience to have a dog out on the trail with you. YOu're not gonna go out on the trail with your new dog right after you get home from the pound and be able to do what these videos show.

    There should almost be a disclaimer to this effect at the end of the videos if they are out there in the public domain on YOutube because there is always that one person utterly devoid of common sense who won't understand this.

    But yeah, having a dog with whom I could ride like this would be awesome....
    Strava made me do it....

  4. #4
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    Buzz kill!

    Valid points, of course but it could be fun to have a thread celebrating how awesome trail dogs can be instead of focusing on the negative possibilities.

    As Unglued knows, we have trail dogs-in-training so they are no where near the ability of Kaia or Lily. But we know that and take it into account when planning rides with them by taking them riding on unpopular trails or during quiet times and never on group rides. It helps that it's winter so other trail users are going slower in general than summer. We hope they will be excellent trail dogs eventually but they are not there yet. They are also in obedience training.

    I am thinking about getting one of those leash contraptions BCD has to attach to the bike so I can take them on busier trails as the weather gets warmer.

    If anyone has other tips to train a dog to be a great trail dog, I'd be happy to hear them.

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    Ughhh, I've almost been seriously injured by irresponsible owners bringing unleashed dogs into the Don. I've also come very close to killing a dog, same reason...

    Unleashed dogs do not belong on mountain bike trails. Period.

    The only time an unleashed dog is safe on a mountain bike trail is if there are no other cyclists.

    Blind corners, fast running, quiet animal, hills, roots, unpredictable line availability...

    Ya, I'm a buzz kill, but worse are selfish *******s who think it's reasonable to threaten the safety of others and their dogs to make a cool video...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnikcdn View Post
    Ughhh, I've almost been seriously injured by irresponsible owners bringing unleashed dogs into the Don. I've also come very close to killing a dog, same reason...

    Unleashed dogs do not belong on mountain bike trails. Period.

    The only time an unleashed dog is safe on a mountain bike trail is if there are no other cyclists.

    Blind corners, fast running, quiet animal, hills, roots, unpredictable line availability...

    Ya, I'm a buzz kill, but worse are selfish *******s who think it's reasonable to threaten the safety of others and their dogs to make a cool video...
    Just to play devil's advocate for all those selfish ********s, if you are not riding within 100% control while out on the trails, you might want want to keep the name calling to a minimum. This is one of the first cardinal rules of mountain biking, if you have any fear of an unpredictable trail user around a blind corner, in a technical section, or encountering one an a downhill perhaps you should slow down (even come to a stop, I do it all the time). This isn't limited to dogs. It could be horses, children, bird watchers or other mountain bikers with limited skill sets. Approaching any of these trail users without due caution could potentially put all parties at risk. You could also just be approaching ******s as well, they come in all forms.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor View Post
    Just to play devil's advocate for all those selfish ********s, if you are not riding within 100% control while out on the trails, you might want want to keep the name calling to a minimum. This is one of the first cardinal rules of mountain biking, if you have any fear of an unpredictable trail user around a blind corner, in a technical section, or encountering one an a downhill perhaps you should slow down (even come to a stop, I do it all the time). This isn't limited to dogs. It could be horses, children, bird watchers or other mountain bikers with limited skill sets. Approaching any of these trail users without due caution could potentially put all parties at risk. You could also just be approaching ******s as well, they come in all forms.
    I do ride under control. I'm a human being with a conscience.

    You can't ask a dog to do so...

    There is no equivalency.

  8. #8
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    Both of my children, from about 3 on, have walked off leash in the Dundas Valley. A well trained dog would be much likelier to get out of the way of a fast moving rider than a small child...
    "I love being on a bike. It helps me feel free. I get it from my dad", by Guillaume Blanchet

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    Quote Originally Posted by Biggie View Post
    Both of my children, from about 3 on, have walked off leash in the Dundas Valley. A well trained dog would be much likelier to get out of the way of a fast moving rider than a small child...
    Well trained... likelier... and, most importantly, according to you. Why should I trust a stranger's dog? Why should I trust the stranger who says their dog is harmless?

    An animal is still an animal. It will be far harder to see, faster, quieter and far less predictable. Even a well trained dog will bolt if it sees a wild animal to chase.

    Your kids will likely be brightly dressed and accompanied by at least one brightly dressed adult. They do not move very fast... Hopefully you're watching them.

    Come on people... You cannot say that allowing dogs to run on bike paths without a leash is safe... as much as you want to, as much fun as it would be, please, don't!

    At least use a leash...

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    Ah....another my view of trail use is better then your view of trail use thread.

    Next week we discuss banning small children from trails.

  11. #11
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    On on hand I can appreciate that some people make very little attempts to reasonably share the trails with fellow trail users. That can include adults, children, dogs, etc. I don't mind sharing the trails with any of them and don't expect free and instantaneous passage or right of way, but I do appreciate it when any combinations of the above engage in any actions that let people pass each other in a safe manner without undue delay, whether oncoming or overtaking. Dogs may have little sense of that, but if their handlers take reasonable actions within a reasonable period of time that's good enough for me.

    The million dollar question in this discussion is what trails are being discussed are "mountain bike trails"? To the best of my knowledge these are few and far between, mostly as privately owned facilities which have their own posted rules concerning different types of trail users (or whether the use is strictly limited to mountain biking). All other trails are typically on public land, not restricted specifically to mountain bike use, and therefore not truly "mountain bike trails" in any exclusive sense. While one may expect that a fellow mountain biker is focused primarily on the mountain bike experience, that may not always be true. They may be out primarily to share time with their dog, and just happen to be riding rather than walking.

    Maybe mountain bikers are the most visible and perhaps even most numerous type of user on some trails, but that doesn't necessarily impart priority in their use.

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    I really don't like putting absolutes on anything.

    There are responsible trail users and irresponsible trail users. At times there are responsible trail users that act irresponsibly and vice versa.

    Due caution needs to be exercised by all users at all times. This could include keeping a dog off a certain trail, or slowing your speed while cresting a blind roller. It could mean slowing while approaching a family out for hike, or getting off your bike and allowed a equestrian to pass. It certainly includes having a dog that responds to verbal commands. I've seen a number of working dogs that I'd trust more to do what's told of them in the presence of squirrel than I would a mountain biker enthusiastically getting back to the parking lot for that beer.

    I think if everyone thought more about the experiences of the people around them and how their actions influenced that, we'd all get along way better. Even then, crap would happen (you know how many times I've had oh $hitz moments with deer in Dundas Valley).

    There are irresponsible trail users in every shape and form unfortunately. Stroking one user group with a black and white brush does no good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by VVagabond View Post
    Do it!!

    I love that video! Here's another awesome internet famous trail dog:

    <iframe width='500' height='281' src='http://www.pinkbike.com/v/embed/227689/?colors=C80000' allowfullscreen frameborder='0'></iframe>
    OMG, that was incredible! I love it when the guy is walking the bike and Lily is basically running circles around him. Talk about anxious.
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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor View Post
    I really don't like putting absolutes on anything.

    There are responsible trail users and irresponsible trail users. At times there are responsible trail users that act irresponsibly and vice versa.

    Due caution needs to be exercised by all users at all times. This could include keeping a dog off a certain trail, or slowing your speed while cresting a blind roller. It could mean slowing while approaching a family out for hike, or getting off your bike and allowed a equestrian to pass. It certainly includes having a dog that responds to verbal commands. I've seen a number of working dogs that I'd trust more to do what's told of them in the presence of squirrel than I would a mountain biker enthusiastically getting back to the parking lot for that beer.

    I think if everyone thought more about the experiences of the people around them and how their actions influenced that, we'd all get along way better. Even then, crap would happen (you know how many times I've had oh $hitz moments with deer in Dundas Valley).

    There are irresponsible trail users in every shape and form unfortunately. Stroking one user group with a black and white brush does no good.
    I find dogs on the trail to be much more predictable then most humans.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor View Post
    I really don't like putting absolutes on anything.

    There are responsible trail users and irresponsible trail users. At times there are responsible trail users that act irresponsibly and vice versa.

    Due caution needs to be exercised by all users at all times. This could include keeping a dog off a certain trail, or slowing your speed while cresting a blind roller. It could mean slowing while approaching a family out for hike, or getting off your bike and allowed a equestrian to pass. It certainly includes having a dog that responds to verbal commands. I've seen a number of working dogs that I'd trust more to do what's told of them in the presence of squirrel than I would a mountain biker enthusiastically getting back to the parking lot for that beer.

    I think if everyone thought more about the experiences of the people around them and how their actions influenced that, we'd all get along way better. Even then, crap would happen (you know how many times I've had oh $hitz moments with deer in Dundas Valley).

    There are irresponsible trail users in every shape and form unfortunately. Stroking one user group with a black and white brush does no good.
    That "beer" comment was directed at me, wasn't it?
    Strava made me do it....

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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor View Post
    I've seen a number of working dogs that I'd trust more to do what's told of them in the presence of squirrel than I would a mountain biker enthusiastically getting back to the parking lot for that beer.
    Hey..Squirrel.


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    sputnikcdn,

    Please change your attitude, one like that will make no friends with other trail users. At many trail systems mountain bikers need more friends.

    Banning other trail users is not the answer, so long as they are not destructive to the trail.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Unglued View Post
    That "beer" comment was directed at me, wasn't it?
    No, not directly. Had I been targeting you I would have mentioned black-out profanity laced tirade.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor View Post
    No, not directly. Had I been targeting you I would have mentioned black-out profanity laced tirade.
    Oh come on. That only happened 3 or 4 times. In the same ride.
    Strava made me do it....

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    I think I'd like an Airedale. And can you believe more snow is on the way?!
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    Quote Originally Posted by bishskate View Post
    And can you believe more snow is on the way?!
    Excellent.


  22. #22
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    I want a dog

    A dog is a great idea. I got into this sport because of my dog. All I say is "bike ride" and he's jumping all over. Right now (living in Canada) he doesn't understand the bike trainer as he isn't running and I'm going nowhere lol. To add to the discussion, as a dog owner, I myself don't trust all dogs off leash. But I also have my dog off leash while we ride, he listens to my commands and is actually more focused on the trail then me. He also wears a bear bell to warn oncoming trail users of his presence in times where he is ahead of me ( usually the first hour or so). To continue on the positive, I find most people are happy to see him and want him to stop for more water breaks than needed to just give him a pat. Dogs, well trained, are great riding pals... They never complain or bail last minute. They'll even let you share their post ride beer!

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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnikcdn View Post
    Well trained... likelier... and, most importantly, according to you. Why should I trust a stranger's dog? Why should I trust the stranger who says their dog is harmless?

    An animal is still an animal. It will be far harder to see, faster, quieter and far less predictable. Even a well trained dog will bolt if it sees a wild animal to chase.

    Your kids will likely be brightly dressed and accompanied by at least one brightly dressed adult. They do not move very fast... Hopefully you're watching them.

    Come on people... You cannot say that allowing dogs to run on bike paths without a leash is safe... as much as you want to, as much fun as it would be, please, don't!

    At least use a leash...
    I hit a bear once. I'm fine with dogs on the trails.
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    I got a dog 7 years ago. A vizsla (Hungarian pointer). Tons of energy and needs to be run off leash. I found an area where people hardly went outside of our town and let her run off leash. Thought "hey it would be cool to mountain bike with her" so I started making trails in this area. Then other people started making trails in this area. When I ride on the trails, she does circles around me for an hour and a half. Mostly now I ride these dog trails with other people.

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    I won't say any more than this, because obviously I'm in the minority in this.

    I'll repeat - unleashed dogs do not belong on mountain bike trails. Period.

    Dog owners have all kinds of other places to take their dogs to run. It's not safe to have an unleashed dog on a mountain bike trail.

    Edit... to the people who sent me personal messages - thanks, but I know how to ride a bike. And safely.

    Taking an unleashed dog in a mountain bike trail, unless you know you're alone, is an inherently selfish act.

    I'm out...

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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnikcdn View Post
    I won't say any more than this, because obviously I'm in the minority in this.

    I'll repeat - unleashed dogs do not belong on mountain bike trails. Period.

    Dog owners have all kinds of other places to take their dogs to run. It's not safe to have an unleashed dog on a mountain bike trail.
    Guess I get to rain on your promenade. But unless there has been a significant change of trail classification in Ontario. So significant that hell freezes over. Almost all trails in Ontario are not Mountain Bike trails as in not mountain bike only. Which means they are used by us as well as others and contrary to our view not mountain bike trails.

    So that means we have to accept off leash dogs, deaf seniors walking in the woods, and children running all over. Part of the deal when it comes to land access for everyone. Only 2 alternatives to this would be taking up Gravel Grinding or Buying a huge piece of land and making your own private trails.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnikcdn View Post
    unleashed dogs do not belong on mountain bike trails...
    ...an inherently selfish act.
    The irony in your posts is hilarious

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    Wow, this got nasty fast.
    There's obviously a lot of emotion in this. On one side, people love their dogs and their outdoor experiences with their dog. On the other, people have been frightened for their own safety (and that of the dogs they nearly hurt).

    From a personal perspective, I am very nervous every time I encounter a dog on the trail, because I have no way of knowing if it is well trained, or wildly unpredictable. I am also nervous encountering horses, children, old people, other mountain bikers, joggers with earbuds etc.

    It really is a question of context. If I'm on a mountain bike specific trail, I do not expect to encounter dogs (or most of the other listed threats). If I am out in a local Conservation Area, I get grumpy when I encounter unleashed dogs, because they are prohibited.

    I do really respect those who have trained their dogs well (in all contexts). I never, ever trust a dog (near my bike, my hand or my child). You just never know.

  29. #29
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    I don't mind dogs on the trail, however, if your dog is unleashed and I run it over because he jumps in the way, I'm not feeling bad about it. If your child is in the middle of the trail, I will gladly stop, and say hello and make every effort not to startle or upset the family time.

    Your dog might be your pet, but to me he's a liability, a moving target. I've never had a child bite me, try to knock me down or grit their teeth at me. I've had a dog do all of it.

    If you really value your pet, you'll leash him on multi use paths. If the dog "gets it" as well as you say he does, we've got no problem, do we?

    Lastly, if I'm out on the trail hiking with my kids and your (strange) dog gets too close to my small kids, I've got every right to discourage that (strange) animal from approaching. I might use my voice, I might use my boot. If you love that dog, you'll keep him from learning the hard way.
    Todd

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    Thanks to people with attitudes like Todd none of you need every worry about encountering my dogs loose on the trail. They are far too important to me for me to expose to someone who considers then a "liability", or a "moving target", or would kick them if they got too close.
    Strava made me do it....

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unglued View Post
    Thanks to people with attitudes like Todd none of you need every worry about encountering my dogs loose on the trail. They are far too important to me for me to expose to someone who considers then a "liability", or a "moving target", or would kick them if they got too close.
    In my overall experience with dogs on the trail. Occasional problem dog while the rest simply run up to say high and have a sniff. Maybe hint for a scratch behind the ears.

    Humans on the other hand..........

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unglued View Post
    Thanks to people with attitudes like Todd none of you need every worry about encountering my dogs loose on the trail. They are far too important to me for me to expose to someone who considers then a "liability", or a "moving target", or would kick them if they got too close.
    Hey man, I didn't say I'd go looking for trouble... Lots of dogs are friendly and social. Some aren't. I've got no way of telling in the 3 seconds when I'm approaching them & their master. I've spooked a pair of shepherds with their family and the guy holding their leash nearly went down in their lurch. Had there been no leash, I'd have wrestling 2 angry, protective animals,on the ground. My wife had a toonie sized chunk taken out of her calf by a Jack Russell Terrier(!) while jogging in 2010.

    What would your impression be like after that kind of experience?
    Todd

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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor View Post
    Just to play devil's advocate for all those selfish ********s, if you are not riding within 100% control while out on the trails, you might want want to keep the name calling to a minimum. This is one of the first cardinal rules of mountain biking, if you have any fear of an unpredictable trail user around a blind corner, in a technical section, or encountering one an a downhill perhaps you should slow down (even come to a stop, I do it all the time). This isn't limited to dogs. It could be horses, children, bird watchers or other mountain bikers with limited skill sets. Approaching any of these trail users without due caution could potentially put all parties at risk. You could also just be approaching ******s as well, they come in all forms.
    gotcha... could have been a racoon...
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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trail Ninja View Post
    I hit a bear once. I'm fine with dogs on the trails.
    poor bear...
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Todd- View Post
    I don't mind dogs on the trail, however, if your dog is unleashed and I run it over because he jumps in the way, I'm not feeling bad about it. If your child is in the middle of the trail, I will gladly stop, and say hello and make every effort not to startle or upset the family time.

    Your dog might be your pet, but to me he's a liability, a moving target. I've never had a child bite me, try to knock me down or grit their teeth at me. I've had a dog do all of it.

    If you really value your pet, you'll leash him on multi use paths. If the dog "gets it" as well as you say he does, we've got no problem, do we?

    Lastly, if I'm out on the trail hiking with my kids and your (strange) dog gets too close to my small kids, I've got every right to discourage that (strange) animal from approaching. I might use my voice, I might use my boot. If you love that dog, you'll keep him from learning the hard way.
    my dog will make your boot hurt...
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor View Post
    Stroking one user group with a black and white brush does no good.
    stroking with happy end is always good...
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    Quote Originally Posted by VVagabond View Post
    If anyone has other tips to train a dog to be a great trail dog, I'd be happy to hear them.
    buy him a carbon fat bike. no training required.
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  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by -Todd- View Post
    Hey man, I didn't say I'd go looking for trouble...
    The way your post read to me, that's pretty much exactly what it said, but I'll give you the benefit of the doubt.

    We both agree that dogs and cyclists/runners/etc often do not mix well on the same trail. But as a cyclist and a dog owner, I see both sides of the story and if we're using the same trail, that means treating one another with respect. And respect does not begin with you kicking someone's dog if it makes you feel uncomfortable, any more than it does with a dog owner putting a stick in your spokes if you startle them coming around a blind corner.
    Strava made me do it....

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    Gotcha?

    Really?

    A raccoon is a nocturnal animal. It's not going to threaten anyone's safety on a trail. For wild animals in the Don I've seen wolves, deer, foxes, rodents etc. They are all afraid of humans. Dogs are generally not.

    There's a distinct difference in tone here between dog owners and non-dog owners. Perhaps the dog owners could take a lesson in that....

    Just because you think your dog is safe doesn't mean it is. Nor does it mean anyone else will believe it's safe. Your words mean nothing to me if your dog is running at me.

    I've been very specific. It is an inherently selfish act to bring an unleashed dog on a mountain biking trail unless you know you have the trail to yourself.

    There's a reason there are laws in cities for on/off leash areas.

  40. #40
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    I love dogs, had one for many years. Had only one really good scare on the trails when a doberman chased me from the double track into the single track at Hilton Falls at an alarming speed. I just stopped put my bike in between us and made no movement. Turned out to be friendly but it took the owner a long time to catch up with us. All my other encounters were pretty friendly and I got to stop and sometimes chat with nice folks. Honestly the two nastiest incidents with dogs happened on the road riding through local neighborhoods and having dogs shoot out of backyards or porches. One smaller dog was definitively trying to bite me. I was able to outrun another one that seem to have evil intentions, but really scared me and forced me into Cavendish mode. That would be good training for those road guys. I have had way more incidents with people than with dogs. There was an isolated incident with a raccoon and on the road at that.
    Many people head out to the woods and don't realize that they will encounter mountain bikes. I am sure we have all run into hikers, specially in the AF that think we are nuts for riding in there. They have voiced this to me. Most places are not bike specific and I have never run into a dog at Buck or Harwood. The Don is a whole different story. The place has hit critical mass and it is not like anywhere else. By the same token, there has to be a modicum of respect towards others if you have a dog and it is not well behaved and it should always be leashed if is is aggressive or runs at people. But even leashed dogs can be a problem if they are on 20 ft of leash and taking up the whole trail. Lets all get along people.
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  41. #41
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    There's a distinct difference in tone here between dog owners and non-dog owners. Perhaps the dog owners could take a lesson in that...
    Or you can learn from dog owners.

    I am more afraid of some people than of any dog.

    Including riders coming around the blind corner at speed. Particularly in the Don.

    Paul - if great majority of posters around here disagree with you - you may consider adjusting your opinion. Trying to go with your head through the wall is not going to take you anywhere.

    I dont take my dog to any of the trails but completely respect the right of those that do. Our trails are not speed training velodrom type of facilities. They are multiuse trails and that is good. The more people use them - the more will be built.

    It is surprisingly easy to peacefully coexist.

    I suggest you try it.

    Oggie
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    Reading comprehension people. It's also a selfish act to go bombing around blind corners, spook horses, not slow down around pedestrians, other riders, kids, not yield to the climbing rider etc.

    Of course we have to use the trails together. To not share is to be selfish.

    Allowing your unleashed dog to run on the trail is not sharing.

    Several of you dog owners have stated you don't bring your dog on the trail for safety reasons. How is that inconsistent with what I've said?

    Oggie, I don't need any advice from you, thanks.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnikcdn View Post
    Reading comprehension people. It's also a selfish act to go bombing around blind corners, spook horses, not slow down around pedestrians, other riders, kids, not yield to the climbing rider etc.

    Of course we have to use the trails together. To not share is to be selfish.

    Allowing your unleashed dog to run on the trail is not sharing.

    Several of you dog owners have stated you don't bring your dog on the trail for safety reasons. How is that inconsistent with what I've said?

    Oggie, I don't need any advice from you, thanks.
    It seems that all of your problems in life were self inflicted Paul. You have become so bitter and miserable, but the person in the mirror might be the culprit.

    Chill out. No one wants to be around that kind of attitude. Where did Paul that I used to know go?
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    Maybe if you stopped listening to rumours and ask the source you might realize I'm doing quite well, thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnikcdn View Post
    Maybe if you stopped listening to rumours and ask the source you might realize I'm doing quite well, thanks.
    I dont listen to rumours. I am glad that you are doing well. I wish you nothing but the best.
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    No one calls me Maurice.
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    I've been trying to get my Lab on the local trails for years but she refuses to ride with clipin pedals and platforms hurt her paws. Maybe she needs shorter crank arms.

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    I use to take my dog out on the trails when he was younger and had lots of energy, I am sure that many of you have seen him a races and on the trail. As for training a dog while on a mountain bike I am a firm believer that the owner is the alpha and should always lead that way you can take the dog off to the side when you hear approaching riders and make them sit quietly, they will be exercising and happy so they will listen and you have already established yourself as the leader.

    On the other end, I do regularly ride though an off leash dog park to get to some really good trails around town. I ride with caution and confidence. Most of the time the dogs could care less that I am there other times they bark and chase me so I stop and say hi that is all they want to do, they think it is a game. Be confident and calm and the dog will respect that no matter what the owners are like and the demeanor of the dog. I won't say every dog but the majority of them that are off leash are well behaved because the owner has confidence in them to not run away and again they are exercising and are happy.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnikcdn View Post
    Reading comprehension people. It's also a selfish act to go bombing around blind corners, spook horses, not slow down around pedestrians, other riders, kids, not yield to the climbing rider etc.

    Of course we have to use the trails together. To not share is to be selfish.

    Allowing your unleashed dog to run on the trail is not sharing.

    Several of you dog owners have stated you don't bring your dog on the trail for safety reasons. How is that inconsistent with what I've said?

    Oggie, I don't need any advice from you, thanks.
    Completely consistent. You don't want to hurt yourself because of irresponsible dog owners. I don't want my dogs to get hurt by irresponsible riders.

    The point is that no-one has an absolute right to a multi-use trail. Not riders. Not hikers. Not dog owners. So we all have to respect one another.

    If you are unable to do that, and want to take a zero-tolerance approach, put your bike in your trunk and go ride Hardwood. Ain't no dogs there.
    Strava made me do it....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Unglued View Post
    Completely consistent. You don't want to hurt yourself because of irresponsible dog owners. I don't want my dogs to get hurt by irresponsible riders.

    The point is that no-one has an absolute right to a multi-use trail. Not riders. Not hikers. Not dog owners. So we all have to respect one another.

    If you are unable to do that, and want to take a zero-tolerance approach, put your bike in your trunk and go ride Hardwood. Ain't no dogs there.
    No dogs other than Lapdogs? Whats the difference?
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    Quote Originally Posted by osokolo View Post
    No dogs other than Lapdogs? Whats the difference?
    You'll find out soon, I understand
    Strava made me do it....

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