Results 1 to 21 of 21

Thread: Durham Forest

  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    206

    Durham Forest

    I ride Main Tract regularly, which is lots of fun ( though I can't figure out why people say you can get lost in there for days!! 15 minutes in ANY direction and you will cross one of the main fire road trails. It's just not that big). But today I was driving around and noticed Timber Tract on Consession 6 south of eastern Uxbridge, and Norton Tract at Coppins Corners. Are there any trails in those? I didn't see any where to park at either, and I can't find any information online for them.
    Last edited by was98strat; 10-28-2007 at 12:32 PM.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jmurray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    405
    Main Tract is the largest Durham Forest tract. All the others are much smaller. I think there are trails in there, but just flat wide walking paths.

    Yes you cross the fire roads every 15 minutes or so, but when you know the trails (single track that is) you can hook up a 2 hour ride. And if you incorporate Walker Woods and Glen Major across the road you're looking at 3-4 hours (depending on how fast you like to ride).
    Jason Murray
    Rep for Ontario, IMBA Canada
    Visit the IMBA Canada site to keep current on all things IMBA in Canada.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    206
    Quote Originally Posted by jmurray
    Main Tract is the largest Durham Forest tract. All the others are much smaller. I think there are trails in there, but just flat wide walking paths.

    Yes you cross the fire roads every 15 minutes or so, but when you know the trails (single track that is) you can hook up a 2 hour ride. And if you incorporate Walker Woods and Glen Major across the road you're looking at 3-4 hours (depending on how fast you like to ride).
    Where's Glen Major? I've been looking for Trails and Glen major, but when I've asked the LBS's in the area, they all said to stick with Durham forest, it's a much shorter drive to get to! If it's across the street, then that would be great, are there any maps for Glen Major and Walker Woods?

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jmurray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    405
    What LBSs are you talking to? All of them should know this property? Glen Major, Walker Woods, 3 Rocks.

    If you get to the Bell Tower in Durham Forest go down the gravel drive to the road. Cross the road and take a look at the trail head kiosk. It has a map on it. Or drop me an email jmurray at disillusion dot ca and I'll send you the map I have. It's slightly out of date, but more than adequate.
    Jason Murray
    Rep for Ontario, IMBA Canada
    Visit the IMBA Canada site to keep current on all things IMBA in Canada.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    206
    Quote Originally Posted by jmurray
    What LBSs are you talking to? All of them should know this property? Glen Major, Walker Woods, 3 Rocks.

    If you get to the Bell Tower in Durham Forest go down the gravel drive to the road. Cross the road and take a look at the trail head kiosk. It has a map on it. Or drop me an email jmurray at disillusion dot ca and I'll send you the map I have. It's slightly out of date, but more than adequate.
    I think it might have been Pedal Performance, but that was in the spring so I'm not sure anymore, just one of those things that I filed in the back of my head.

  6. #6
    MTB Rider
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    876
    There's a new map for Glen Major/Walker Woods. Some of the trail posts have been moved and/or renumbered. Contact the Toronto Region Conservation Authority.
    2008 Trek Fuel EX 8
    Oshawa, Ontario, Canada

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    206
    Quote Originally Posted by revrnd
    There's a new map for Glen Major/Walker Woods. Some of the trail posts have been moved and/or renumbered. Contact the Toronto Region Conservation Authority.

    OK, silly question.... but I gotta ask, why does the TORONTO region conservation authority seem to own and manage the DURHAM forest?? or at least what seems to be alrger tracts of it!!

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jmurray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    405
    Quote Originally Posted by was98strat
    OK, silly question.... but I gotta ask, why does the TORONTO region conservation authority seem to own and manage the DURHAM forest?? or at least what seems to be alrger tracts of it!!
    The Toronto and REGION CA manages a lot of land in the Toronto area and surrounding REGIONS. The formed out of a merger of the MTRCA (M for Metro) and a few smaller CAs.

    But they don't manage Durham Forest Main Tract, the Lake Simcoe and Region CA (LSRCA) does. I'm not sure who manages the smaller tracts like Secord. I wouldn't be surprised if it was the TRCA since it is in the Duffin's watershed.

    CAs divide jurisdiction based on watershed. DF is in a different watershed than Glen Major.
    Jason Murray
    Rep for Ontario, IMBA Canada
    Visit the IMBA Canada site to keep current on all things IMBA in Canada.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    47
    The conservation authorities are quite unique to Ontario based on their history. They were born out of the need to manage the watersheds as to prevent flooding. In those days, the GTA was prone to flooding especially in the river valleys (which were populated - see Don, Humber etc.) with loss of life not unusual. Some of the problem was based on building on flood planes but a great deal of the problem was based on upstream activities (i.e. on the Morraine) such as clear cutting and farming. The conservation authorities were created to address the problem hence why they are organized by watershed.

  10. #10
    I wonder why?
    Reputation: i1dry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    537
    Quote Originally Posted by was98strat
    I ride Main Tract regularly, which is lots of fun ( though I can't figure out why people say you can get lost in there for days!! 15 minutes in ANY direction and you will cross one of the main fire road trails. It's just not that big). But today I was driving around and noticed Timber Tract on Consession 6 south of eastern Uxbridge, and Norton Tract at Coppins Corners. Are there any trails in those? I didn't see any where to park at either, and I can't find any information online for them.
    There is a significant tract of trails on the west side of Connsession 6 that connects to Glen Major (across the road) west of the bowl that is being regenerated (west of the meadows).

    The trails in the tract west of Concession 6 form a series (maze) of interconnecting loops that run all the way to Brock Road (where there is a parking lot). These trails are all mapped with sign posts as are Glen Major and Walkers Woods.

    The trails are a mix of single track and some grassy (cut) double track. While the area is well marked it is not ridden often (I don't think many know about them), however, it appears that horses are ridden in the area (though I have never seen them). If these trails were ridden more (on bikes) they would easily get in great condition. The area is predominantly hilly and there is great flow.

    i1dry?

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jmurray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    405

    Hurricane Hazel

    I heard somewhere that the formation of the CAs also came as a result of what Hurricane Hazel did. Anyone know the truth of that?

    And does anyone know of a history of the CAs that is online? (of offline for that matter) I wouldn't mind reading a little history on the matter.
    Jason Murray
    Rep for Ontario, IMBA Canada
    Visit the IMBA Canada site to keep current on all things IMBA in Canada.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    206
    I had a look at the Map posted on the TRCA website, looks like you can hook up a really good long ride!! How long do you think Main tract to Brock Rd and back would take?

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jmurray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    405
    I can easily hook up a 3 hour ride from DF Main Tract through Walkers down to Glen Major and back. If you went over to Brock Rd (through the Brock Tract) I think you might be able to stretch it to 3.5 or even 4 hours. But that is hitting just about every trail there is. And I warn you now you probably won't like the Brock Tract trails much. The are just moved grass over old horse trails.
    Jason Murray
    Rep for Ontario, IMBA Canada
    Visit the IMBA Canada site to keep current on all things IMBA in Canada.

  14. #14
    Looking for Adventure
    Reputation: Ricksom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,023
    Quote Originally Posted by jmurray
    I heard somewhere that the formation of the CAs also came as a result of what Hurricane Hazel did. Anyone know the truth of that?

    And does anyone know of a history of the CAs that is online? (of offline for that matter) I wouldn't mind reading a little history on the matter.
    Yup, you are right......here is a summary.

    http://www.hurricanehazel.ca/Website...p?OpenDocument
    SUCCESS - To be able to spend life in your own way

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    517
    Quote Originally Posted by was98strat
    Where's Glen Major? I've been looking for Trails and Glen major, but when I've asked the LBS's in the area, they all said to stick with Durham forest, it's a much shorter drive to get to! If it's across the street, then that would be great, are there any maps for Glen Major and Walker Woods?
    If you just wanna drive there you can enter from 3 rocks, or next time your going to Durham, instead of turning into the parking lot, keep driving straight along that gravel road.
    You'll see a parking lot on your right.
    On your left is the Durham Bell tower.
    www.mtbiker.ca

    My Rides:
    FSR XC -R7 Platinum - SRAM X7 (26.5lbs)
    Cervelo SLC - SRAM Rival - Reynolds DV46T (16.25 lbs)

  16. #16
    I wonder why?
    Reputation: i1dry's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    537
    Quote Originally Posted by jmurray
    I can easily hook up a 3 hour ride from DF Main Tract through Walkers down to Glen Major and back. If you went over to Brock Rd (through the Brock Tract) I think you might be able to stretch it to 3.5 or even 4 hours. But that is hitting just about every trail there is. And I warn you now you probably won't like the Brock Tract trails much. The are just moved grass over old horse trails.
    Actually Jason, the trails aren't that bad, they are a bit rough though. With a bit of traffic they could become quite good (i.e., packed down singletrack).

    I've taken a few "newbees" to these trails on a few tours over the past few weeks. All have ridden Durham/Walkers/Glen Major extensively and really enjoyed the Brock Tract trail system and want to go back. In fact, we are trying to ride these (in larger groups) on a farily regualr basis to pack things down to produce more clearly delineated singletrack.

    Once these trails are "broken in" they will be a great addition to the overall trail system. There is a parking lot just off of Brock Road (a bit north of Claremont) so you can actually start there and ride over and up through to Geln Major into Durham and back.

    I'd encoure people to ride these trails as they can be fun to explore and as I've stated have the potential to be quite good if ridden more often.

    i1dry?

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    206
    Wow I've learned more about Durham forest (and it's associated tracts) in the last 24hrs than all summer!!! someone really needs to put a booklet together of the whole system!! that would achieve i1dry's goal of a more extensive defined system!! I might have to work on that over the winter!

  18. #18
    MTB Rider
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    876
    Quote Originally Posted by i1dry
    There is a significant tract of trails on the west side of Connsession 6 that connects to Glen Major (across the road) west of the bowl that is being regenerated (west of the meadows).

    The trails in the tract west of Concession 6 form a series (maze) of interconnecting loops that run all the way to Brock Road (where there is a parking lot). These trails are all mapped with sign posts as are Glen Major and Walkers Woods.

    The trails are a mix of single track and some grassy (cut) double track. While the area is well marked it is not ridden often (I don't think many know about them), however, it appears that horses are ridden in the area (though I have never seen them). If these trails were ridden more (on bikes) they would easily get in great condition. The area is predominantly hilly and there is great flow.

    i1dry?
    It's referred to as the Brock Tract.

    The Ganaraska C/A was started in the 40s due to soil erosion caused by poor farming practices (sandy soils). http://www.grca.on.ca/history.htm
    2008 Trek Fuel EX 8
    Oshawa, Ontario, Canada

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    47
    See below. The "tipping point" was the flooding. Port Hope was flooding long before the damage Hazel did in the lower Don and Humber - hence Ganaraska being one of the first CA's. As I stated earlier, see point 3 for why the authority by watershed.


    About Us > Mandate > Conservation Ontario Story > History > Ontario's 36 CAs

    Local appeals for a new initiative in conservation in Ontario were heard in the late 1920s and 1930s when the combined results of drought and deforestation led to extensive soil loss and flooding.

    Throughout the Depression years and those of World War II that followed, organizations such as the Ontario Conservation and Reforestation Association, which had its roots in the counties, the Federation of Ontario Naturalists and individuals writing for The Farmer's Advocate, pressed the case for conservation and wise resource management. Many of these leading conservationists believed that real progress in developing a new approach to natural resource management would not occur until an integrated approach was undertaken using natural watershed boundaries.

    Although the responsibility for managing natural resources lay with the Province, the scale of erosion and water problems was such that it required a new approach, and when a number of municipal councils agreed to become involved, this spirit of cooperation led to the passage of the Conservation Authorities Act in 1946.

    Three Fundamental concepts of this new approach were embodied in the Act:

    1. Local Initiative - A Conservation Authority in any area could only be formed when the desires of the residents reached the point where they were willing to request the government of Ontario to form an Authority. In making the request, the local people had to face up to the responsibility of contributing financially to the works of the Authority and also agree to assume the burden of running the corporate body known as the Conservation Authority. This latter task involved burdens and responsibilities similar to the running of a municipality. The local initiative requirement meant that people living close to the problems were required to recognize and solve them. It also meant that solutions would not be imposed from above and an Authority would only undertake those plans which it could face economically, culturally and democratically.

    2. Cost Sharing - The Conservation Authorities Act stipulated that the costs of projects should be shared by municipalities and by the provincial government. This proved to be one of the soundest ideas in the Authority movement. It has meant that an Authority can flourish only when the local people have enough enthusiasm and conviction to support it financially.

    3. Watershed Jurisdiction - Conservation Authorities were to have jurisdiction over one or more watersheds. This stewardship was to cover all aspects of conservation in the area. This has meant that a Conservation Authority has been able to handle such problems as flood control in a complete and rational basis. By its power to establish regulations, an Authority has been able to protect life and property, river valleys from building encroachment and erosion problems.

    Since this rather quiet beginning, Authorities have become involved in a wide range of activities depending on the resource management concerns of local residents, member municipalities and the Province. The following list summarizes the range in program development, but it must be kept in mind that all Authorities do not implement all programs. Each Authority's watershed management program is geared to its own special needs and conditions.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jmurray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    405
    Quote Originally Posted by i1dry
    Actually Jason, the trails aren't that bad, they are a bit rough though. With a bit of traffic they could become quite good (i.e., packed down singletrack).
    More riders will help, but only on the trails that were not old horse trails. Those have deep existing treads that you either ride in (and bang you pedals) or ride beside (and hope you don't fall in).

    In the future we might be allowed to build officially sanctioned single track in there. But for now you'll just have to ride the mowed grass.
    Jason Murray
    Rep for Ontario, IMBA Canada
    Visit the IMBA Canada site to keep current on all things IMBA in Canada.

  21. #21
    MTB Rider
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    876
    Quote Originally Posted by jmurray
    More riders will help, but only on the trails that were not old horse trails. Those have deep existing treads that you either ride in (and bang you pedals) or ride beside (and hope you don't fall in).

    In the future we might be allowed to build officially sanctioned single track in there. But for now you'll just have to ride the mowed grass.
    I noticed where the ground was prepped before the pine trees were planted is furrowed. Not a "condition" you normally ride on.

    The reason I went over was that I've ridden Glen Major/Walker Woods a lot this year & I wanted to check some new trails. Plus it was Saturday & I figured it would be busy there. As it was, I saw 3 solo mushroom pickers along the trail then 2 couples heading out w/ pails back @ the parking lot.
    2008 Trek Fuel EX 8
    Oshawa, Ontario, Canada

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •