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  1. #1
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    Best place to get new wheels

    Hey all,

    Just wanted peoples opinions or experiences with where the best place to buy wheels are. I certainly dont mind spend a bit extra at a LBS to support them but the ones by my house are never close in price to what I find online.

    I have yet to shop for wheels tho, so I don't really know what to expect. Anyone have any tips on where to shop for wheels in person or online?

    For online I hear CRC is good

  2. #2
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    if you're looking for pre-built wheels, most shops are going to order them from a catalog so i don't know if one is going to be any better than another. hand built wheels are a whole new ballgame...
    RIP Adam Yauch

    "M.C. for what I AM and do, the A is for Adam and the lyrics; true"

  3. #3
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    Like a lot of people I'm sure, I dont have a very big budget to spend on wheels. I feel like hand built wheels will be out of my price range.

    I'm lookin at Stans or Sun Ringle etc... something of that nature. First wheel upgrade, lookin for better then stock

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigGK View Post
    Like a lot of people I'm sure, I dont have a very big budget to spend on wheels. I feel like hand built wheels will be out of my price range.

    I'm lookin at Stans or Sun Ringle etc... something of that nature. First wheel upgrade, lookin for better then stock
    When I got my Stans Arch's, I ordered them through my LBS, and they ended up ordering the hubs, rims, tape, spokes etc and building them in-house so you may end up with hand-built rims after all.
    Strava made me do it....

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    i used crc custom build option for my wheels (hope 2, ex823, generic spokes). love em. not too pricy either (i was comparing to pre-built options on crc and the custom build was cheaper)

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    yea I'll go to a LBS and check the retail they want and compare I guess thats the easiest way, just asking for people who have actually purchased wheels the route they took and what they would suggest.

    I appreciate both of your responses Unglued and pizon, thanks!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigGK View Post
    yea I'll go to a LBS and check the retail they want and compare I guess thats the easiest way, just asking for people who have actually purchased wheels the route they took and what they would suggest.

    I appreciate both of your responses Unglued and pizon, thanks!
    BTW, you can't go wrong with Stan's, especially if you are going to run the wheels tubeless (which I assume you are as it is the whole point of having Stans wheelsets in the first place). They are light and the hubs are reasonably good. A word of warning, though - the Crests are super-light but are a wee bit delicate for us slightly bigger folks (I'm 180). If you are 170ish+, I would recommend the Arch EX's as they are almost as light and a lot stronger.

    I also hear good things about the Sun Ringle Black Flag wheel. I understand that they are basically the same wheelset as the Arches.

    Either way, you won't regret this upgrade.
    Strava made me do it....

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    Those are the exact 2 wheel sets I had in mind. Thanks for the info!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unglued View Post
    BTW, you can't go wrong with Stan's, especially if you are going to run the wheels tubeless (which I assume you are as it is the whole point of having Stans wheelsets in the first place). They are light and the hubs are reasonably good. A word of warning, though - the Crests are super-light but are a wee bit delicate for us slightly bigger folks (I'm 180). If you are 170ish+, I would recommend the Arch EX's as they are almost as light and a lot stronger.

    I also hear good things about the Sun Ringle Black Flag wheel. I understand that they are basically the same wheelset as the Arches.

    Either way, you won't regret this upgrade.
    haha, not me...I got a set of stans flow ex's laced to hope pro 2's and run them with tubes, even tho I got the valve stem/rim strip for them...i was skeptical on the eyeletless rims but they are staying so true and no cracking by the spokeholes (not skeptical on that anymore) super strong too, did a few runs at blue with them in 2011, true as the day i got em, no retensioning/retrueing yet. maybe i'll finally go tubeless with them this year.

    to the OP, as Veteran Youth said in another thread: a nice wheelset is probably the best investment you can make, rotational weight making the biggest noticeable difference for any component upgrade on your bike...you can always order the parts online and get your lbs to build them for you (that way you are loyal to your shop and your savings)...stans has a discount wheels section on their site, and they run sales on some stuff once in a while, in the summer they were blowing out arch hoops for half price. CRC also does demo and display discounted stuff.
    ...a truly skeptical position would be a very uncertain one.
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  10. #10
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    these all appear to be better deals in my opinion

    crank bros cobalt

    easton haven

    easton ea70
    RIP Adam Yauch

    "M.C. for what I AM and do, the A is for Adam and the lyrics; true"

  11. #11
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    I had a set of Stan's Crest 29" hoops built up to just over 1500g for around $800 shipped by Dave at Speeddream wheels. Awesome experience as he builds them to your riding style, weight, and other preferences. Still as true as they were when I got them a year ago!


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  12. #12
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    [QUOTE=saturnine;10055114]these all appear to be better deals in my opinion

    crank bros cobalt

    I've heard horror stories about these wheels from Crank Brothers. I think our own Garage Monster may have had a problem with them too!
    "I love being on a bike. It helps me feel free. I get it from my dad", by Guillaume Blanchet

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Biggie View Post
    I think our own Garage Monster may have had a problem with them too!
    Nope, love mine but I'm not doing the 1000s of kms per season I used to either so only time will tell.

    It was Easton XCOnes that gave me all the heartache. Bearings started going snap, crackle and pop right at the end of their first year. I'm told they've fixed the problem now...
    Please enjoy seeing this terrible collection of me - something wonderful is about to happy.

  14. #14
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    Factory Hope Hoops on Stans rims from CRC are hard to beat price-wise.

  15. #15
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    hand built all the way!

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    So getting back to my original point, not that I dont appreciate everyone's posts thus far, just wondering more where is the best place to order wheels.

    Any LBS in T.O. area that have good prices? or no one can match CRC

  17. #17
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    If you go to most local bike stores and tell them you want wheels they will order them from a catalog already built. A lot of stores don't want to bother building up a wheelset anymore. If that's what they prefer, you might as well shop online and get the best possible price. Jenson is nice because they tell you exact price you'll pay to get it to your Canadian doorstep. You won't get any surprise duty fees.
    Don't buy Easton or Crank Brothers wheels. Do a search, they suck. Get whatever Stan's you can afford.

  18. #18
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    I've ordered three wheelsets from CRC, all at prices my LBS couldn't touch - when CRC was blowing out last year's wheel model. Aside from wheels, my LBS does a close enough job matching online retailers that I don't bother buying online to save 15-20%.

    I've been happy with black flag pro's as well as charger pro's (both 29er model) and now running Stan's 650b flows on hope pro II hubs. At my weight (~200 geared up) I found the Stan's Arch EX 29er wheelset to be quite flexy - enough to rub the inside of the seatstays).

    Happy shopping!
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  19. #19
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    CRC will build wheels too won't they? Get some Hope PRO2 evo hubs laced to Stans rims with DT spokes and brass nipples and I think you would have a reasonably priced performing wheelset that will be much better than most factory wheelsets. The whole proprietary spoke thing going on with Crank Brothers, Mavic and other factory wheels is a deal-breaker for me.

  20. #20
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    Your LBS are highly unlikely to match CRC's prices. Unless you have lots of spare time to visit them, I wouldn't bother.

    With Jenson, put the item in the shopping cart, go to checkout to get the exact price including shipping and taxes.

    With CRC, choose the free shipping option (CRC tends to ship large/expensive items with tracking anyway, so no sense in paying extra for expedited shipping just to get tracking). Figure in $9 brokerage fee and 13% tax to that to get the final price. If you are lucky, the package will slip through Canada Border Services unnoticed and you won't have to pay brokerage and taxes (bonus!), but likely you will have to pay and it will still be cheaper than anything else on the planet.

    Jensen ships UPS, so if no one is home during the day to receive the package, you need to wait for UPS to attempt delivery, then call the number on the attempted delivery notice slip, ask them to hold it at the depot for you, wait 24-48 hours, then take time off work to drive to the depot which luck would have it is often on the other side of town. And guess what? They aren't open during lunch and have business hours, a waiting line, and customer service worse than most banks.

    With CRC, your order will arrive via Canada Post. They usually attempt delivery once and then hold it at the nearest post office, which for me is a Shopper's Drugmart down the block open from 9am to 9pm.

    Whatever you choose to do, don't order from an online retailer that ships "UPS Ground" Google "UPS brokerage fee scam" to find out why.

    I hate UPS. Can you tell?
    Last edited by ray.vermette; 01-10-2013 at 12:44 PM.

  21. #21
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    crc is hard to beat, that's why retailers hate them
    RIP Adam Yauch

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  22. #22
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    When I order from Jenson the guy just leaves it at my door. That's ok for me. Someone is always here to bring it in.

  23. #23
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    What are peoples views on buying a wheel set used. I have found a couple sets now that sound pretty good. Some with tubeless tires already installed (not sure how I feel bout this, cause I dunno how quality the installation was) or just the complete wheel, no tires.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine View Post
    crc is hard to beat, that's why retailers hate them
    They must do huge volume.
    Please enjoy seeing this terrible collection of me - something wonderful is about to happy.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigGK View Post
    What are peoples views on buying a wheel set used. I have found a couple sets now that sound pretty good. Some with tubeless tires already installed (not sure how I feel bout this, cause I dunno how quality the installation was) or just the complete wheel, no tires.
    Used wheels OK in my books. Not any more of an issue than buying anything used, in that each type of component has things you would ideally inspect to determine condition. Your ability to perform that inspection depends on your own knowledge and skills plus the amount of time you want to make available relative to the cost of the goods.

    If you head further down the used path and want some tips I'm sure the collective group here could chime in on how to inspect and evaluate, either as a basic once over or fine tooth comb (which may not be possible if you aren't accustomed to doing your own wheel maintenance for freehub, bearings, and spoke tension/true). Then again, there's no bad time to start learning, and it may provide you with an excuse to increase your knowledge with some of these items if you aren't already at that point.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigGK View Post
    What are peoples views on buying a wheel set used. I have found a couple sets now that sound pretty good. Some with tubeless tires already installed (not sure how I feel bout this, cause I dunno how quality the installation was) or just the complete wheel, no tires.
    I agree with Circlip. Should be fine as long as you know what to look for. They should be round, run true and not have wonky spoke tension. The bearings should be smooth and quiet.
    Please enjoy seeing this terrible collection of me - something wonderful is about to happy.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by garage monster View Post
    They must do huge volume.
    Well, let's put it this way, the CRC warehouse is bigger than the various distributors' warehouses which serve Canada.

  28. #28
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    It is tough to beat CRC for price and service. Personally I picked up a set of the 29er Havens last year when they were $500. At that price, it was down right impossible to say no, especially considering that's less then what the LBS wanted for the front wheel alone. The LBS quoted me almost $900 to order a set of black flag pros (yes they have to order them), when they could be had online for under $500... So, why order through a bike shop who HAS TO order through one of the monopoly wholesalers in Canada? I like my LBSs and use them often, but I like saving $400+ a lot more.

    According to MTBR users Eastons have had a rough go with their wheels in the past, specifically with their bearings (although this issue has been fixed as GM notes above). I for one have not had any issues whatsoever, although admittedly I have put less than 700kms on them, so my time may be coming. However, Easton also has a great reputation for customer service and warranty service, so I feel pretty confident in my wheels. Plus, they aired up tubeless without issue (using a compressor) and as already said, have been absolutely flawless. Oh and they look sweet.

    So basically, that's a recommendation, for what its worth.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by garage monster View Post
    They must do huge volume.
    <iframe id="nbc-video-widget" width="560" height="315" src="http://www.nbc.com/assets/video/widget/widget.html?vid=229045" frameborder="0"></iframe>

    "How do you make money doing this?" The answer is simple: Volume.
    Last edited by ray.vermette; 01-11-2013 at 08:10 AM.

  30. #30
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    CRC does huge volume indeed, but there must be an element of it that has something to do with the UK. Ribble, ProBikeKit, Shinybikes and sometimes Wiggle all have fantastic prices compared to pricing in North America, let alone an LBS in Canada. I calculated that I saved $1100 on my Campagnolo groupset by ordering through Shiny Bikes (which is much less than CRC's asking price), and I suspect they do much less volume.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by aerius View Post
    Well, let's put it this way, the CRC warehouse is bigger than the various distributors' warehouses which serve Canada.
    Combined?

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Circlip View Post
    Used wheels OK in my books. Not any more of an issue than buying anything used, in that each type of component has things you would ideally inspect to determine condition. Your ability to perform that inspection depends on your own knowledge and skills plus the amount of time you want to make available relative to the cost of the goods.

    If you head further down the used path and want some tips I'm sure the collective group here could chime in on how to inspect and evaluate, either as a basic once over or fine tooth comb (which may not be possible if you aren't accustomed to doing your own wheel maintenance for freehub, bearings, and spoke tension/true). Then again, there's no bad time to start learning, and it may provide you with an excuse to increase your knowledge with some of these items if you aren't already at that point.
    OK, I feel like I got a grip on where to look for wheels now. I think used could be a very good option but if not then CRC seems to be a winner.

    So getting back to used, I do like to learn especially regarding things I enjoy. Makes it easier to stay focused, lol. So if I end up buying a used set of wheels what should I do to test/check them?

    Look for obvious visual damage, check spoke tensions. I get that but what about the hubs? What if they come with tubeless tires already mounted how can I check the tires will hold air longer then when I'm looking to buy em?

  33. #33
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    Good basic rundown - thanks. I'll also add that it's important to clean the hubs and rims, find a place with good lighting, then look for any cracks in the hub flanges or shells, plus the rim itself (most common right around the spoke holes)

    Quote Originally Posted by garage monster View Post
    They should be round, run true
    Round is definitely an advantage.

    Lateral true perhaps not so important with disc wheels as it was with rim brakes. So long as tension is relatively even (see below) I really don't have a big problem with 1-2mm of lateral runout. Also important to note that some people get very concerned about runout on the mounted tire casing rather than checking the actual rim that is the more important concern.

    Quote Originally Posted by garage monster View Post
    and not have wonky spoke tension.
    Casual check method in the absence of a tensiometer is simply to pluck the spokes at the centre point like a musical instrument string. For a disc wheel set, on each face of each wheel (4 faces in total) the tone of each pluck across a face will ideally not have any significant variations i.e. much higher or lower than the others. Even tension means a robustm durable wheel relative to its build components. Absolute tension isn't something that's easy to check without instrumentation, or a reference wheel to compare it to that has been previously verified with an tensiometer, or else more significant experience working with wheels.

    Quote Originally Posted by garage monster View Post
    The bearings should be smooth and quiet.
    Tough to quickly evaluate if one doesn't recognize whether a hub has a preload system or not, and how to check the preload first. Bad bearings can be made to feel pretty smooth by easing up on the preload a bit. Having preload too low will cause premature wear eventually, of course, but the point being that on initial inspection one could inappropriately rig their preload to make their bearings to seem really smooth spinning and quiet.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Circlip View Post
    Round is definitely an advantage.
    What he means to say is that vertical runout is important. Lots of over-eager wheel builders/truers end up with oval wheels.
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    Quote Originally Posted by garage monster View Post
    What he means to say is that vertical runout is important. Lots of over-eager wheel builders/truers end up with oval wheels.
    Meh, I just think of it like Biopace or Q-Ring technology for wheels. Time it all right with the rotational point of the wheel in optimal position (high or low vertical runout) according to the terrain both front and rear tires happen to be rolling over at any given time and you can increase efficiency noticeably.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigGK View Post
    What if they come with tubeless tires already mounted how can I check the tires will hold air longer then when I'm looking to buy em?
    Don't sweat the tires at all. Focus on the wheels. Indeed, if it was me, I'd demand to see the wheels with the tires off first so I could get a look at the inside of the rims.

    If you're buying wheels that are supposed to be set up tubeless (i.e. Stans or Black Flags or any UST offering) then you WILL be able to mount them tubeless and have them hold air, even if the tires already mounted do not. For example, the tires already mounted may be blown or may not have sealant. However, a fresh set of tires and sealant and you'll be good to go.

    Your main priority should be focused on the condition of the wheels.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thewake View Post
    Don't sweat the tires at all. Focus on the wheels. Indeed, if it was me, I'd demand to see the wheels with the tires off first so I could get a look at the inside of the rims.

    If you're buying wheels that are supposed to be set up tubeless (i.e. Stans or Black Flags or any UST offering) then you WILL be able to mount them tubeless and have them hold air, even if the tires already mounted do not. For example, the tires already mounted may be blown or may not have sealant. However, a fresh set of tires and sealant and you'll be good to go.

    Your main priority should be focused on the condition of the wheels.

    I dig I dig

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigGK View Post
    I get that but what about the hubs? What if they come with tubeless tires already mounted how can I check the tires will hold air longer then when I'm looking to buy em?
    The Cole's notes version;

    1) Check to see that there isn't any side to side slop / laterally play in the bearings and axle assembly. You shouldn't see any gaps between elements of the assembly changing, hear clicking, or feel movement.

    2) Failure to pass 1) above could simply mean poor preload adjustment if any is available, or else pooched bearings. However, if 1) above is OK then you can simply turn the axle by hand to detect any noticeable "notchy" or "crunchy" feeling. Difficult to describe what is acceptably crunchy versus too crunchy feeling. If you spin an entire built wheel around the axle then anything other than really crunchy isn't noticeable, which is why you have to turn the axles in your hand with the wheel stationary to get a feel for it.

    3) Freehub inspection is a bit trickier without taking it apart (disassembly and reassembly varies in difficulty from hub to hub) and knowing what you are looking at. Simple test is to turn it by hand both ways, should be consistent sound of repetitive click pattern in one direction, and solid lock fairly quickly in other direction. Perform with more and less force, faster and slower, more rotation and less rotation. 30-60 seconds and you're done.

    4) Use common sense to determine if anything looks mangled in a material way that may compromise function or life expectancy.

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    So now another scenario for you all fine people to help me with. HAHAHAHA

    after all this wheel talk I have found 2 different sets of used wheels and I'm not sure which is the better buy.

    Set 1) Stans Arch (not EX) with Hope pro 2 front hub and pro 2 evo rear hub. No Tires. Wheels fully assembled.

    Set 2) Black Stan Arches (not EX) with Green Ano CK hubs and Racing Ralphs tires already mounted. Wheel fully assembled.

    Set 1 is $450 and set 2 is asking $625 but I know theres wiggle room on set#2

    I'm leaning towards set 1, I think the rim is exactly what I'm looking for with tons of reviews about how much people love em. Well I guess both sets have the same rim, both have solid hubs from what I can tell, set #1's are GOLD, BLANG BLANG. and I'm not sure I want the RR tires anyways.

    Are CK (chris knight) hubs fair superior to Hope?

  40. #40
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    Chris King. Chris King hubs are some of the best out there.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigGK View Post
    So now another scenario for you all fine people to help me with. HAHAHAHA

    after all this wheel talk I have found 2 different sets of used wheels and I'm not sure which is the better buy.

    Set 1) Stans Arch (not EX) with Hope pro 2 front hub and pro 2 evo rear hub. No Tires. Wheels fully assembled.

    Set 2) Black Stan Arches (not EX) with Green Ano CK hubs and Racing Ralphs tires already mounted. Wheel fully assembled.

    Set 1 is $450 and set 2 is asking $625 but I know theres wiggle room on set#2

    I'm leaning towards set 1, I think the rim is exactly what I'm looking for with tons of reviews about how much people love em. Well I guess both sets have the same rim, both have solid hubs from what I can tell, set #1's are GOLD, BLANG BLANG. and I'm not sure I want the RR tires anyways.

    Are CK (chris knight) hubs fair superior to Hope?
    If set 2 is in good shape, hands down I would pick the King's. I've owned 2 sets of Hope Hubs, and 2 sets of Kings.

    1. King hubs are fantastic. Much better engagement (72 pts vs 24pts), and King has better customer support should you need spare parts down the road. Hope UK is going to send you to Hope USA when you have an issue or spare part, and then they are going to discover that you are in Canada, and then pass the buck to Canadian distributer who will in turn send you back to Hope USA because you did not purchase through a Canadian dealer. After a week has passed someone in USA or UK will grumble and eventually send you what you need. I've had this happen to me on 3 different occasions(broken pawl springs, broken seatpost clamp, and broken brake dust caps). The King's are slightly "less serviceable" with normal tools than the Hope's but they don't require it often, and they are very smooth. The seals on the rear Hope hubs aren't that great in comparison. Cycle Solutions has all the tools and experience required should you need service. They also sound much nicer! Don't get me wrong, the Hope hubs are still great, I still have one set, and I like how easy they are to service, but given the choice, King! There are lots of people running 10+ year old King hubsets. Down the road if you ever decide to sell, wheelset #2 will have better resale value as well.

    2. Racing Ralphs are fantastic tires. Great traction in a lot of different conditions, and very respectable weight.
    Last edited by nspace; 01-10-2013 at 08:23 PM.

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    Great response nspace, exactly what I'm looking for. First hand experiences.

    Keep em comming!

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigGK View Post
    Great response nspace, exactly what I'm looking for. First hand experiences.
    Another vote for the CK hubs. I've had wheels based on hubs from CK,Hope, DT Swiss, Industry Nine, Hadley, and more. I liked them all, experienced pros and cons for each, but the CK are still my faves. Lots of good bargains to be had on fully built, used CK and other high end wheels in QR configurations these days because the same people who were more likely to spend on high end wheels are also those who are often moving on to new frames more quickly, with newer standards like 142mm rears, and QR15 fronts.

    Some of the hubs are easily convertible (Hope is actually great for this). Lots of options to reconfigure CK hubs too, but the small parts are a fortune, to the point where it often makes more sense to sell an existing CK set and buy new rather than pay big bucks to change them up.

  44. #44
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    I'll echo that all things being equal in the mechanical/wear/tear department, it'd be a no brainer to go with the CK hubs.

    Also, another avid Racing Ralph fan right here. Best tires going, at least of my little corner of Ontario.

  45. #45
    max_29
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigGK View Post
    Set 1) Stans Arch (not EX) with Hope pro 2 front hub and pro 2 evo rear hub. No Tires. Wheels fully assembled.

    Set 2) Black Stan Arches (not EX) with Green Ano CK hubs and Racing Ralphs tires already mounted. Wheel fully assembled.

    Set 1 is $450 and set 2 is asking $625 but I know theres wiggle room on set#2
    assuming that components on both sets have equal wear, price-wise #2 is a better option.

  46. #46
    db9
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    Re: Used Hopes
    Of your 2 options - as others have pointed out - the CK set is a better hub than the Hopes.. However don't be afraid of Hopes. I'm using that exact same setup (Hope/Arch) on my Jet9 (29er) I'm 187lbs (+kit) and no issues. I agree that parts for Hopes in Canada is a joke, I've had the same experience as nspace - ultimately I just order my spare parts (I run Hope brakes as well) from CRC, Wiggle, UKBikeStore etc.

  47. #47
    Rep'n the 905
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    What about if you had $550 budget on new wheel set, would there be a different combo you might go for.

    If you rode most XC with some AM, 2-3 times a week in the summer, rider weight of roughly 180-185lbs fully geared up on a 2012 stumpy HT

  48. #48
    max_29
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigGK View Post
    What about if you had $550 budget on new wheel set, would there be a different combo you might go for.

    If you rode most XC with some AM, 2-3 times a week in the summer, rider weight of roughly 180-185lbs fully geared up on a 2012 stumpy HT

    Superstar Components - High Spec Parts For Peanuts

    with TL28 rims.

  49. #49
    Evil Jr.
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    Quote Originally Posted by max_29 View Post
    Those look lovely but I'm easily distracted by pretty things. Name brand rim and spokes - the only wildcard is the hubs.
    Please enjoy seeing this terrible collection of me - something wonderful is about to happy.

  50. #50
    db9
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigGK View Post
    What about if you had $550 budget on new wheel set, would there be a different combo you might go for.

    If you rode most XC with some AM, 2-3 times a week in the summer, rider weight of roughly 180-185lbs fully geared up on a 2012 stumpy HT
    As others have said you can't go wrong with the numerous suggestions that have been made. Ultimately I built my own but then that's my thing - buying parts on sale and my labor is free

    If your going the pre-built route as others have suggested look at the sales going on now at the UK shops, Jenson etc.. and get the best in your $ range. If your not happy with what you find, save a bit.

    I'd like to have a CK in back and a extralight or tune up front but then this is more than my budget would allow.

    If your bike is a 29er, Flow/Arch on hope/DT/CK is always a good bet (I have Mavic/DT 240 on my 26er BTW)
    This is my opinion - which is just that - a opinion but then this is what I'm using and have no experience with Easton.

    Just don't spend for the sake of spending. What ever you buy needs to be an upgrade over what your currently using (if its an improvement your looking for)

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