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  1. #1
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    Aggressive Dog Encounter

    Okay...so there I am riding this morning...not seeing anyone on the trails...its cold..its windy...and maybe I am little slower than normal...due to a drink or two with the neighbours the night before...
    I am pushing up a longer stretch of trail...when I come upon a hiker....I call forward to give her lots of warning of my approach...she moves over...and WAM...her dog...off leash comes a calling...very loud ...very large and very intimidating....
    I slow down...begin to stop...but fido is not liking me...
    So I push on...leaving the hiker and I thought the dog behind....
    As I round a slight bend...there is fido...on me...barking trying to bite my wheels and feet....
    Not really sure what is the right things to do...stop or push on...maybe a little faster...I decide to keep going.
    I keep at it for at least 1/2km...and the dog is still there...

    Question is...What's the right thing to do..STOP and wait for the dog owner...or get the hell outta there....???
    lucky for me I guess...he finally gave up on me...after about 800m...but wow...not a fun encounter.

    Not sure where he went after...I am only assuming back down the trail his owner...


  2. #2
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    I usually stop, put the bike between me and the dog. Then I launch a furious warcry. Always works.

  3. #3
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    The other day I managed to drag 3 dogs at least 200m from their owners. They start to chase, I hear the owners call their name, I start calling their name, the dog keeps chasing......eventually they give up. I can only hope they spent a long time finding the dog.

    One time a couple years ago I got a dog to follow me for 3-4 km, almost all the way home.

    Was this in Pickering? If so, where? I usually ride in Duffins creek valley.

  4. #4
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    For dogs, chasing is a form of play. When you kept riding the dog probably thought you wanted to play so gave chase. I tend to stop and use my bike as a barrier.

    But shame on the owner who didn't grab the dog's collar when you quite correctly announced your presence.
    Strava made me do it....

  5. #5
    snowbound
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unglued View Post
    For dogs, chasing is a form of play. When you kept riding the dog probably thought you wanted to play so gave chase. I tend to stop and use my bike as a barrier.

    But shame on the owner who didn't grab the dog's collar when you quite correctly announced your presence.
    I rode Greenwood today, South of the 5th there were so many dogs, Announce ourselves, stop, allow dog owners to hold their dogs. We were chased by a "playful" mastiff like dog for at least 1k. At that point we decided to turn around and lead this playful 150 lbs beast back to where it hooked on to us, and came across one very relieved dog owner/walker.

  6. #6
    Workin for the weekend!
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    Watched a pup almost run off the Escarpement in fear of me a few weeks ago. No leash, an untrained dog and 200' of gravity is a bad recipe.

    What are these dog owners thinking?

  7. #7
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    Seems like a dog complaining thread. And yes, some owners aren't that bright, but just a story to the opposite from yesterday.

    I love seeing dogs off-leash, especially in relatively remote areas, as long as they are somewhat behaved (non aggressive). I have no issues slowing down for them, or even making a spin back if they follow me.

    So yesterday, I was riding on the Hamilton to Brantford rail trail. There was a black lab on the trail, no one apparently in sight. I slowed down, he came to me, checked to see if he had any tags. None. I then heard a crash in the bush and saw someone cutting wood. It was apparent the dog was out and exploring while his master did some work. Took off, he started pacing me, he had such a happy look that he was running. I realized he was starting to get to far away. I slowed hoping he would peel off, but he keep pacing me. I was about to turn around, but I just did the old. 'Sit, stay'. He looked at me like I just ruined his day. But he stayed as I rode off and turned around.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by CptSydor View Post
    Seems like a dog complaining thread. And yes, some owners aren't that bright, but just a story to the opposite from yesterday.

    .
    If anything it is a dog owner complaining thread. A dog can't help what it is. As an owner, you have to be responsible for your dog all the time. That means that if your dog doesn't come when you call, it should not be off leash outside a fenced in off leash area. To do otherwise isn't fair to the dog or the people you may encounter.

    And yes, before anyone asks, I'm a dog owner. I have my dog ( Scooter, a 6 year old retriever/poodle cross ) off leash all the time, but I would never have her loose anywhere I am likely to encounter bikers, and on occasions where I do unexpectedly meet bikers, I hold her collar, keep her on a leash or put her in a sit beside the trail until the bikes have passed. I wish more people would train their dogs properly.
    Strava made me do it....

  9. #9
    Workin for the weekend!
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    Unless I see a leash, I consider the dog hostile. If its not, that's great, if it is, I'm prepared. Owners that care about their dogs leash them unless on their own property or in a dog park.

    Leash your dog, so I don't have to worry about its next move, my well being is much more important than your dogs freedom.

    PS, I grew up with a dog in the house, love them, enjoy them. Too many lazy owners who don't get it for me to care about being nice about it anymore...

  10. #10
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    Had a random ownerless dog chase me along a sidestreet this morning. I'd post my headcam footage, but I think the mic caught some profanity from the guy wearing it.

    The dog broke off the chase before I merged into rush-hour traffic on Bayview Ave, so clearly the dog wasn't quite as clueless as it's owner.

    'twas the second such incident in as many days.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    Had a random ownerless dog chase me along a sidestreet this morning. I'd post my headcam footage, but I think the mic caught some profanity from the guy wearing it.

    The dog broke off the chase before I merged into rush-hour traffic on Bayview Ave, so clearly the dog wasn't quite as clueless as it's owner.

    'twas the second such incident in as many days.
    Maybe you need to find a new route to work?

    It's funny how many dog owners cannot possibly imagine how their cute little puppy is actually a slavering 90lb monster with the brains of a 2 year old and the ability to crush beer cans with its jaw.
    Strava made me do it....

  12. #12
    sheep in FOX clothing
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    Windfields park is the worst, I probably have a big growling dog chase me every second or third time I ride through there.... and it's almost always different owners and different dogs

    But this morning's incident was pretty much at the end of my street, and well within range of my 3-year old daughter's summer rides. Not good.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unglued View Post
    For dogs, chasing is a form of play. When you kept riding the dog probably thought you wanted to play so gave chase. I tend to stop and use my bike as a barrier.

    But shame on the owner who didn't grab the dog's collar when you quite correctly announced your presence.
    +1, I agree and do as above. Typically once you stop I find the dog will lose interest. Unless the dog is old and feeble trying to outrun it in a trail riding situation is futile anyway. And if it really wanted to bite you it probably would have went for you early on during the encounter, and not gone after your wheel and pedal.

    Might add that I learned the above the hard way many years ago when I was bitten on the leg by a dog while on a road ride. Next stop was the hospital for tetanus shot.

  14. #14
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    Been biten once chased numerous times, usually stopping and yelling a loud firm NO seems to stop them. But in my experience the ones that don't bark have their ears pinned back in hot pursuit are the dangerous ones. On a road ride a water bottle squirt to the face or in extreme cases a frame pump swat followed by a full on sprint has saved my bacon. On the mountain bike stop and get the bike in between yourself and the aggressive dog as trying to outrun the dog is difficult at best. The time i was bitten the owner just stood and watched as he feebily called the dog to heel, luckily i was wearing stretchy pants and my skin wasn't broken.
    it tied the room together man!

  15. #15
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    Just to balance out any anti-dog feelings, here's a picture of my pup, who is actually scared of bikes and runs away from them...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Aggressive Dog Encounter-close-up-3.jpg  

    Strava made me do it....

  16. #16
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    I have more trust in dogs then the owners.

    Oh, I just love idiot owners who chirp..."Oh, don't worry. He's friendly." Or some other stupid statement. Unless you have had a mind meld with the mind of your dog you have bout as much clue to what it is thinking as you do to your wife's thought process.
    www.teamnfi.blogspot.com



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  17. #17
    sheep in FOX clothing
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    Years back I was forced to stop and get off when I had no viable way to outrun the dog, and ended in a prolonged fight using my bike as a shield while he tried to bite my hands through the frame. The owner stayed about a quarter mile away and did not intervene. He gave up after I kicked gravel in his face for about 5 minutes.

    On another dismounted occasion a hysterical owner said I was using my bike as a weapon to assault her dog and that if I just let him sniff my hand...

    So yeah, I haven't had the greatest luck with that approach. Maybe if I was a dog person I could get a better read of their behavior.

    It warrants mention though that I pass dozens of dogs every week, about half (technically illegally) off-leash, and less than 5% even bark at me.

  18. #18
    sheep in FOX clothing
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unglued View Post
    Just to balance out any anti-dog feelings, here's a picture of my pup, who is actually scared of bikes and runs away from them...
    Does your dog have eyes? How does he see where the bike is?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
    Does your dog have eyes? How does he see where the bike is?
    She has a very keen sense of smell...
    Strava made me do it....

  20. #20
    I wonder why?
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    I was riding with a group of friends at 8th Line a couple of years ago and we came upon a group of walkers who had a fairly large dog with them off leash. I was in the lead and slowed down when passing the dog and it just looked at me. Same thing for the person behind me, the dog just watched her go by. The third person wasn't so lucky though as the dog jumped up and bit him in the butt as he rode by. Broke the skin too.

    What caused the dog to do this ...who knows. The owners didn't seem to care though.

    We had a good laugh at our friend's misfortune, since the dog seemed to have it in for him alone.

    My guess, is that my friend tensed up when he saw the dog and the dog responded to his fear.

    Even when a dog appears aggressive, I try not to respond and remain calm. It seems to me that they try to provoke you and if you don't take the bait they lose interest.

    Every once in awhile we will get chased by a dog who appears to be running after us for the fun of it. I don't really get bothered by this as long as the dog doesn't run in front of my front wheel. Then I simply stop until it loses interest and moves on.

    Bad behaviour is not the dog's fault, it results from the ignorance and indifference of their humans.

    i1dry?
    ...some drink from the fountain of knowledge..some only gargle...!!

  21. #21
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    had a nice road ride going and after a long climb in

    august heat I was reaching the top in the granny and hoping to put a foot down for breather when a oversized rotty came running and I started screaming like a little girl something like "ggiiiiiiitttttt"when the owner called him and he stopped. Just to let him know I was the boss I started another high pitched giiittttt when he turned back and started after me and about 10 feet away, no more, the owner's call stopped him. She gave me crap and told me not to yell at him again or...........
    The dog, I'm sure outweighed me and the bike.
    This was out in country where the dogs are mostly there to protect the property, or to dine on cyclists.

  22. #22
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    Shoot the hostage.

    Rural farm dogs are the worst. These mean buggers take no prisoner. Either out sprint them (great training) or be prepared to fend for your flesh with the mini-pump.

  23. #23
    Dorkimus Prime
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unglued View Post

    It's funny how many dog owners cannot possibly imagine how their cute little puppy is actually a slavering 90lb monster with the brains of a 2 year old and the ability to crush beer cans with its jaw.
    This is me. Sorry. I walk my sheep dog, who happens to be a breed referred to in Italy as "Wolf Killer", on a great bike trail near my house. However, dog walkers in there outnumber bikers 2 to 1. He isn't aggresive (to me), but I'm sure has startled a couple of cyclists. He doesn't chase though and responds to "Come!"
    "I love being on a bike. It helps me feel free. I get it from my dad", by Guillaume Blanchet

  24. #24
    Dorkimus Prime
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    Quote Originally Posted by shirk View Post
    Shoot the hostage.

    Rural farm dogs are the worst. These mean buggers take no prisoner. Either out sprint them (great training) or be prepared to fend for your flesh with the mini-pump.
    I did a Kincardine -Tiverton - Kincardine ride a few summers ago. As I passed in front of a house a man was just letting out his 2 dogs. I could see he did an "Oh ****!" but couldn't stop the twin terrors from coming after me. Those hell hounds chased me a couple of km into the next town! The sad thing was after sprinting for several minutes if they had caught me I think would have simply disrobed and offered myself to them as rare steak. Except for hitting a house at near mach speed (didn't clip it either, got it dead centre) that was probably my second worst bike moment.
    "I love being on a bike. It helps me feel free. I get it from my dad", by Guillaume Blanchet

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