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Thread: why e-type?

  1. #1
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    why e-type?

    I have an older Trek 6000 that came with a e-type FD. Is there any good reason for this? I know these are used for some bike that can't mount a traditional FD, but I just have a run-of-the-mill hardtail.

    I'm really not a fan of the e-type mount. Is it a safe bet that a standard FD will mount properly?
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  2. #2
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    In some cases the E type is used....

    to facilitate water bottle cage mounting clearance issues as well. Some smaller frames don't accomodate a seat tube mounted derailleur and a water bottle cage at the same time. So to get clearance for the cage an e type front d is speced. Also some manufacturers want to or still use oversized (larger diameter) seat tubes that front d manufacturers don't produce clamp sizes to fit, so the e type is a solution for them as well. From the picture it looks as if you'd have a tight fit even with a low clamp front derailleur if you want to mount a cage on the seat tube. My wife had a 6000 of the same year, same color and a small frame. We never did go to a tube mounted derailleur as she had cages mounted in both locations, down and seat tube, so there was no room. I also recall that the seat post was a 27.2mm but the seat tube was quite a bit larger than that once you got passed the top tube. The seat tube was actually necked down near the top to accomodate the smaller seat post.

    Your best bet is to measure the seat tube below the lower bottle cage bolt with a caliper. If it is in the neghborhood of 34.9mm or smaller in diameter you should be able to mount a low clamp derailleur to it. If it's larger than that, then you know why the bike was speced with an e type. The largest front derailleur clamp diameter produced is 34.9mm.

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  3. #3
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    I don't use a cage on the seatpost, so that won't be a problem. I'm going to take a caliper home from work and measure this sucker

    If I do buy a derailleur, do I need to make sure it is a low-clamp version? I don't know how to judge where the derailleur would clamp.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    I don't use a cage on the seatpost, so that won't be a problem. I'm going to take a caliper home from work and measure this sucker

    If I do buy a derailleur, do I need to make sure it is a low-clamp version? I don't know how to judge where the derailleur would clamp.
    I believe the low-clamp version would only allow for the possible clearance to fit a cage.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by A Grove
    I believe the low-clamp version would only allow for the possible clearance to fit a cage.
    Thanks. I was concerned that the screw for the cage might be in the way of a high-clamp version.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    Thanks. I was concerned that the screw for the cage might be in the way of a high-clamp version.
    There is a possibility of there being a confliction. I am running a f.der. in between the bosses on my '93 hardcore and still manage to squeeze a cage on. Then again, the der. is more than 10 years old

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    Thanks. I was concerned that the screw for the cage might be in the way of a high-clamp version.
    I would go with the low clamp front just to be on the safe side. You can never tell for sure until you have a traditional clamp in hand and are getting ready to install it. Most of the time like A Grove noted you end up with a high clamp between the cage bolts. But there are times when the clamp ends up right on one of the bolt brazons. That's a no go! So to be on the safe side just plan on going with a low clamp. There's little or no difference in performance between the two.

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  8. #8
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    Darn it all. I miked the seat tube, and it is about 35.2

    There goes that idea

  9. #9
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    Well that pretty much....

    settles the question of why the E-type eh? I thought there might be a more compelling reason they went with one than just cost. With that being said, Shimano does produce E-types in every thing from Alivo up to XTR. So if you are looking at it from an upgrade standpoint it can be done. They do have their advantages. It is a rock solid way to mount a derailleur. But it has it's limitations too, as in you are limited to the chain ring sizes that the derailleur is designed to accomodate with no wiggle room. Anyway, sorry that it didn't work out, but we did get you to measure it out before you went for it right? Hopefully it saved you some cash.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

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