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  1. #1
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    Truvativ Stylo Team 3.3 will it fit my bike?

    I recently purchased my first mountain bike and assembling it myself I stripped the threads of the left crank arm of FSA Gamma MegaExo crankset. FSA doesn't have the replacement arms anymore (at least that's what they told me) and my lbss don't want to fix it. I decided to replace the entire crankset (as I understood, other brand crank arms won't fit) and send the FSA to my friends in Europe, they might fix it and use/resell it.

    I've been looking around and thinking about buying Truvativ Stylo Team 3.3 GXP because the rest of my drivetrain is by SRAM and I could get it for about $135. However, I'll gladly accept your recommendations for about the same price range.

    My questions are: is that a good replacement and will it fit my bike? I included some pictures but I am not sure what to take picture of, so if you want more pictures, let me know!

    Oh yeah, how easy would it be to remove FSA and install Truvativ by myself? What tools do I need?

    OK, this is my bike: IronHorse Warrior Expert 2006 http://www.rscycle.com/s.nl;jsession...7&it=A&id=7932
    This is my crankset
    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...28&category=64
    This is Truvativ Stylo Team 3.3 GXP Crankset
    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...09&category=64
    And pictures:


    Thanks for looking!

  2. #2
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    20 hours and not a single reply! What did I do wrong? I'd really like your input before buying it.

  3. #3
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    Here ya go

    Quote Originally Posted by marktomin
    20 hours and not a single reply! What did I do wrong? I'd really like your input before buying it.
    I'm not real opinated about cranksets, so I can't really help you with your buying decision. Replacing a BB isn't tough if you have some good instructions and the right tools. For that I'll turn you over to Park Tools. HTH.

    -R

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unemployed_mechanic
    I'm not real opinated about cranksets, so I can't really help you with your buying decision. Replacing a BB isn't tough if you have some good instructions and the right tools. For that I'll turn you over to Park Tools. HTH.

    -R
    Thanks for the link! Do you think there won't be any compatibility issues with my frame?

  5. #5
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    Any decent mechanic or machinist can fix your crank in 15 minutes. In fact, you could probably take it to NAPA or Autozone, and have them fix it faster than you could replace the whole crankset. Cost is less than $10 to helicoil or to buy a tap and bolt to cut new threads.

  6. #6
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    Not so much

    Quote Originally Posted by EuroMack
    Any decent mechanic or machinist can fix your crank in 15 minutes. In fact, you could probably take it to NAPA or Autozone, and have them fix it faster than you could replace the whole crankset. Cost is less than $10 to helicoil or to buy a tap and bolt to cut new threads.
    First off, 9/16x20tpi threading (LH/RH) is pretty much exclusive to bicycles, there are no helicoils currently in existence outside of bicycle parts manufacturers, so NAPA won't be of any help.

    Helicoiling a pedal is definitely more than a 15 minute job in almost all cases. The mangled threads have to be reamed out, new threads tapped in, then the helicoil is inserted with Loctite 272 or something similar. It has to cure completely before installing the pedal. The helicoil inserts are something like 15 bucks a piece, and the labor around $40-50. The tool kit is also pretty spendy, which most shops will factor into the labor charge, as this is a rarely done repair. I have mixed feelings about these; how well the Loctite holds up I think largely depends on the thread quality, and some aluminum doesn't tap very well. A pedal sees a lot of stress from all directions unlike a simple fastener, so I almost always recommend replacing the crank arm.

    A lot of machine shops have a base charge somewhere around $60-80 plus a per hour rate (sometimes $80+/hr.), so that's definitely not an economical option. It would likely take them a lot longer to fix it, as they won't have direct access to the appropriate helicoil size.

    -R

  7. #7
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    Sorry, I misunderstood. Since you showed BB axle sans crank arm, I assumed you stripped the pinch bolt threads. I agree, helicoiled PEDAL threads are not a good permanent fix for off-road bike, although I know a guy who has put thousands of road miles on them.

    Truvativ and FSA cranks are all over ebay. Since you already have worn rings, chain and cassette, consider buying set without rings or but complete set and use your old rings. If you install new rings with old chain and cassette, your chain may skip under load.

    Google each crank and look up chainline measurement. most MTB triples are now 50mm, so you're pretty safe. To install, I use a small torque wrench, the spline socket for the BB, Loctite 242 on all threads, unless it's a ti frame and then I use ti-prep paste.

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