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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Jul 2006
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    Tossing the Front Derailer?

    I'm not new to the bike sceine just the kind with gears .

    I recently purchased a very entry level bike to get in the grouve with (Diamondback Response Sport). I'm interested however in tossing my front derailer and the associated gears. I basicly only use the center gear, and never touch the others. My rides aren't generally long or fast enough to necessitate that huge front spocket, and the hills here seem to go away w/out jumping down to the mile a minute tinny gear.

    I've also noticed that when I stand up to peddle the chain often times jumps and skips. The derailers front and rear arount rubbing or clicking, and it does it even when my chain is strait from center to center. (Cheap derailer in the back I'm thinking).

    I don't have the cash to toss on a nice rear derailor so I'm asking, is there a way to snug up a new but soft rear derailor? Mine are an Alivio out back, and a Acera up front.

    Thanks for your time,
    Justin

  2. #2
    local trails rider
    Reputation: perttime's Avatar
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    Aug 2005
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    11,832
    Probably your deraileur(s), or actually the cables, need to be adjusted. Shimano has some instructions on their website and Parktool probably covers those adjustments too.

    Going for a single chainring can be done, but usually people still need some sort of a chainguide to keep the chain on. The deraileur system requires a lot of chain, slack taken up by the rear deraileur. The chain still gets enough slack to jump off a chainwheel when riding over bumps.

    Could you be happy on a "single speed" bike (take a lot at the "Single speed" area of the forums)?

  3. #3
    Neg reppers r my biatches
    Reputation: FoShizzle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    17,259
    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    Probably your deraileur(s), or actually the cables, need to be adjusted. Shimano has some instructions on their website and Parktool probably covers those adjustments too.

    Going for a single chainring can be done, but usually people still need some sort of a chainguide to keep the chain on. The deraileur system requires a lot of chain, slack taken up by the rear deraileur. The chain still gets enough slack to jump off a chainwheel when riding over bumps.

    Could you be happy on a "single speed" bike (take a lot at the "Single speed" area of the forums)?
    good advice...

    in addition to perttime's good feedback, when running a single ring up front, to lessen the chance of chain coming off (though not absolutely necessary if everything else set up nicely), do run a bashguard in place of the big ring and put a jump-stop on the inside in which case you will have something on both sides of the middle ring to keep chain from coming off.


  4. #4
    mtbr member
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    Apr 2006
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    It is very likely that your front derailleur needs a simple adjustment, some slight widening of the cage, chainrings need to be straightened or that your bottom bracket needs to be tightened.

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