Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 31
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mark_BC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    644

    Tips for unlinking Powerlink links

    After a little bit of use, those SRAM Powerlinks become very difficult to unlink, especially out in the field with a dirty chain and sore fingers. How do you do it?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Gouda Cheez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    705

    Tips for unlinking Powerlink links

    Park tool does the trick for me.

  3. #3
    Plays with tools
    Reputation: customfab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    4,283
    I don't use them in the first place.

    The 10spd links from SRAM are power lock and need a tool to be removed, everything else should be tool free.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: crossracer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    417

    Tips for unlinking Powerlink links

    Yea, get the park tool, you won't regret it. Simply awesome

    Bill

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mark_BC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    644
    You mean the chain breaker? I have that. So I should basically just leave the powerlinks on there and break the chain somewhere else, and then put on a new powerlink in the new break location?

  6. #6
    Plays with tools
    Reputation: customfab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    4,283
    Are we talking 8/9 or 10 spd chains.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mark_BC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    644
    8 spd

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mark_BC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    644
    Oh this?

    Park Tool Co. MLP-1.2 : Master Link Pliers : Chain

    I'm not bringing that with me.

  9. #9
    Plays with tools
    Reputation: customfab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    4,283
    Squeeze the side plates together and then push the halfs towards eachother. If they're worn enough that they aren't coming apart easily I'd replace them as they are probably worn out.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Gouda Cheez's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    705

    Tips for unlinking Powerlink links

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark_BC View Post
    Oh this?

    Park Tool Co. MLP-1.2 : Master Link Pliers : Chain

    I'm not bringing that with me.
    It's pretty small... for what it's worth. I carry mine in my Camelbak amongst several other tools.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    240
    Out of curiosity, why do you need to remove a powerlink, or a chain for that matter, on a ride? I take a spare powerlink and a chain breaker when I'm out riding, so I can remove a broken link and replace it. But, I keep those Park pliers in my toolbox at home.
    Justin
    Salt Lake City
    2012 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Comp 29
    2006 Specialized Allez Expert Double

  12. #12
    > /dev/null 2&>1
    Reputation: Procter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    1,774

    Re: Tips for unlinking Powerlink links

    Agree with Authalic - you probably won't need to remove a power link on the trail, only add a new one. So, leave the pliers.

    The pinch-to-remove method is for older 8/9sp links. The Sram 10sp power link can't be removed like that, and, its very hard without the pliers. I was able to do it only once without the Park tool pliers and it took me 20 min of struggling, including stabbing my hand badly with needle nose.

    There may be 10sp kmc links which are pinch-to-remove, not sure though.

  13. #13
    FKA Malibu412
    Reputation: Glide the Clyde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    4,416
    Quote Originally Posted by authalic View Post
    Out of curiosity, why do you need to remove a powerlink, or a chain for that matter, on a ride?
    Ever blown up a free hub body, causing it to lock up and the geared bike becomes a fixie, which doesn't work so well with a rear derailleur? I, at least, have and removed the chain so I could coast/scooter back to the trail head. Power Link or chain breaker works to get the chain off on a ride.

    OP, get the stupid Park pliers and put them in whatever you carry tools in. I personally can squeeze the side plates and push the link together with my fingers but it sounds as if you struggle with it.
    "I love the bike. It's my meditation. I think I'm bike-sexual." -Robin Williams

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mark_BC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    644
    Yeah I guess there is no reason to remove the link while on tour. If the chain breaks somewhere I'll add another link or two where needed. But I'm not bringing the pliers with me, I have totally loaded my bike up with bikepacking gear. I even cut my toothbrush n half.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    18
    No issue on 9speed KMC missing link but when I changed to 10 speed, then unlinking becomes a problem. Manage to do it on 1st time, but failed on the next attempt. After an hour of struggle, gave up and search the net and found one solution without using a special tool. Need to use a straw rope or any string that can go inside the chain hole and a 4/5mm hex wrench to twist the rope/string. Insert the rope/string on both hole of the missing link. Then tie it tightly but leave a bit of space for the wrench to go in. Once its tied, insert the wrench and start twisting until the link disengage. The tightening of the string squeezes both end of the missing link thus unlinking it.

  16. #16
    More Torque
    Reputation: Diesel~'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    1,849
    Quote Originally Posted by Ka_Noli View Post
    No issue on 9speed KMC missing link but when I changed to 10 speed, then unlinking becomes a problem. Manage to do it on 1st time, but failed on the next attempt. After an hour of struggle, gave up and search the net and found one solution without using a special tool. Need to use a straw rope or any string that can go inside the chain hole and a 4/5mm hex wrench to twist the rope/string. Insert the rope/string on both hole of the missing link. Then tie it tightly but leave a bit of space for the wrench to go in. Once its tied, insert the wrench and start twisting until the link disengage. The tightening of the string squeezes both end of the missing link thus unlinking it.
    I tried that on a 10 speed sram link with a pretty beefy piece of copper wire, and the wire ended up breaking.

    The Park master link pliers will make you laugh the first time you try them, if you've been struggling with a tricky link. SO effortless.

    -D

  17. #17
    dwt
    dwt is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dwt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    4,024

    Tips for unlinking Powerlink links

    Quote Originally Posted by authalic View Post
    Out of curiosity, why do you need to remove a powerlink, or a chain for that matter, on a ride? I take a spare powerlink and a chain breaker when I'm out riding, so I can remove a broken link and replace it. But, I keep those Park pliers in my toolbox at home.
    +1.

    Another home shop or trail removal technique is to clean and lubricate link with good old WD40 or similar product. Link hard to move by hand if gunked up. But the Park link pliers are easiest method
    Old enough to know better. And old enough not to care. Best age to be.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Vespasianus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    3,376
    Quote Originally Posted by customfab View Post
    Squeeze the side plates together and then push the halfs towards eachother. If they're worn enough that they aren't coming apart easily I'd replace them as they are probably worn out.
    What he said. 100% true.
    On MTBR, the reputation is infamous.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Reign2Rider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    281
    If you arn't already, have a look on the side of your chain tool for the hook thing. You hook it onto chain a few links away either side, making a loop that hangs down, it makes dealing with the link much easier. I struggled at first but can get it off in seconds now. Was aligning things yesterday and prob had the chain off 20+ times.

    Tips for unlinking Powerlink links-yto02100.jpg

    Tips for unlinking Powerlink links-2013_header_chaintool.jpg

  20. #20
    Plays with tools
    Reputation: customfab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    4,283
    Quote Originally Posted by Reign2Rider View Post
    If you arn't already, have a look on the side of your chain tool for the hook thing. You hook it onto chain a few links away either side, making a loop that hangs down, it makes dealing with the link much easier. I struggled at first but can get it off in seconds now. Was aligning things yesterday and prob had the chain off 20+ times.
    That looks like a great way to make a simple problem more complicated.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Reign2Rider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    281
    Erm, yeh real complicated. Just hooking the chain with the hook from your multitool really adds to the complexity of the issue. Much easier to fight with it until your fingers bleed.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by Diesel~ View Post
    I tried that on a 10 speed sram link with a pretty beefy piece of copper wire, and the wire ended up breaking.

    The Park master link pliers will make you laugh the first time you try them, if you've been struggling with a tricky link. SO effortless.

    -D
    Yes, copper wire will break as it has a breaking point once it reach a certain angle. So far I have use that works were old LAN cable ( the twisted pair inside of it) and an old shoe lace. So those using laced shoes in the trail, you know you have a secondary use of your shoe lace

  23. #23
    Plays with tools
    Reputation: customfab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    4,283
    Quote Originally Posted by Reign2Rider View Post
    Erm, yeh real complicated. Just hooking the chain with the hook from your multitool really adds to the complexity of the issue. Much easier to fight with it until your fingers bleed.
    Just drop it off the chainring, then you've got all the slack you need.

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DJ Giggity's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,217
    Quote Originally Posted by customfab View Post
    That looks like a great way to make a simple problem more complicated.
    Isn't that the theme of this whole thread?

    Only two infinite things exist: the universe and stupidity. And, I am unsure of the universe
    - Albert Einstein

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    293
    LOL @ the bolt-cutters!

    I find the little hook (mine is part of a Topeak multi-tool) most useful to re-fitting the chain when it's a real pain getting it through the front mech as it flops about and won't cooperate. I agree about the pliers being great for home but not being required on the trail - you can use the chain splitter from your multi-tool in an emergency.
    I run 2 chains and swap over every few weeks so the Park Tool is excellent for that.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Best price on Teva Links or Links Mid?
    By GTscoob in forum Where are the Best Deals?
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-05-2013, 10:15 AM
  2. multiple quick links (power links)
    By BmoreKen in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 02-12-2013, 11:23 AM
  3. Help with Chain/Powerlink
    By hankscorpio in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 09-09-2012, 07:01 AM
  4. SRAM powerlink
    By captnpenguin in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 08-09-2012, 07:39 AM
  5. sram powerlink
    By Eric Z in forum Beginner's Corner
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 07-15-2011, 08:29 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •