Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    9

    Suggestions for a stuck cassette

    I removed the lock ring on the 9 speed cassette but the cassette is stuck on the free hub body. I didn't grease it prior to installation but I've never greased them and had no problems. The hub is I9. I've tried tapping it (lightly) from the inside with a screwdriver and hammer but it wouldn't budge - anyone out there had any experience with this problem?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    8,176
    Unless it's a 1-piece design remove one cog or section at a time by (gently!) prying under one side and then 180 degrees on the other side with a screwdriver, tire lever, or something similar. Before doing that though try turning the cogs counter clockwise, either with chain whips or brute force.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: SFBMRC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    253
    Most likely the individual cogs "bit" into the alloy freehub body. The torque created under load tends to drive the cogs into the freehub body. Brands like Shimano for the most part use steel freehub bodies that do not distort.

    The best thing would be to have two chain whips to "loosen" the stuck cogs. Use on on the largest cog and use the other one on each individual cog in a counter clockwise direction.

    Alternatively you can try to lightly tap each cog in a counter clockwise direction while applying force with the chain whip on the largest cog. The idea with either method is to unseat the cog from the freehub body so it can slide off. This is fairly common with alloy freehub bodies.

  4. #4
    RAKC
    Reputation: tigris99's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    7,128
    What these guys said. Whoever thought aluminum freehub bodies was a good idea in this sport needed to do some research, maybe graduate high school first.

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    27,213
    Quote Originally Posted by tigris99 View Post
    What these guys said. Whoever thought aluminum freehub bodies was a good idea in this sport needed to do some research, maybe graduate high school first.

    Sent from my XT1565 using Tapatalk
    Well, I think it was an attempt to undercut Shimano back in the day, when companies like CK, American Classic, and others came out with hubs dramatically lighter than Shimano, which instantly sold because people are addicted to light-weight like crack cocaine. Shimano has stood by steel and titanium freehubs, which makes a lot of sense, but machining Ti is not easy and takes a lot of manufacturing "power", which these smaller companies can't compete with.

    It would be nice if shimano or someone actually made one-peice cassettes (at least all the gears on a single carrier), but the best they could do was 3 gears on one carrier, 3 on the next, then 2 INDIVIDUAL gears-which is where the problems start, then the two smallest gears (which are a bit wider).

    Solved by SRAMs XD driver though, which allows light weight without the ridiculous scoring that happens. The fact that their cassettes are lighter too is an added bonus.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    30
    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Unless it's a 1-piece design remove one cog or section at a time by (gently!) prying under one side and then 180 degrees on the other side with a screwdriver, tire lever, or something similar. Before doing that though try turning the cogs counter clockwise, either with chain whips or brute force.
    Dito. After removing file down the high deformations. This why SRAM created direct drive. Yes u can spend oodles of money on high end XTR carrier cassettes.

  7. #7
    fog
    fog is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    199
    Yep, I have the same problem with 9-speed I-9 hubs. I used a screwdriver and pried up the stuck cogs at 90 degrees. I like the thought of using chain whips; but I have not had to remove my cassette so I cannot say how it works; but it sure sounds promising!
    good luck,
    Wayne

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Joe Handlebar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    157
    Not to "hi-jack" here...but just FYI... There are a few companies out there, Novatech being one, making nice, light alloy freehub bodies with just one steel insert in one of the splines (Novatech calls it "Anti-Bite Guard"). Makes a steel contact point for any cassette and keeps the rest of the body from getting gouged.
    The member formerly known as Redtires....

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jimw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    491
    Quote Originally Posted by SFBMRC View Post
    The best thing would be to have two chain whips to "loosen" the stuck cogs. Use on on the largest cog and use the other one on each individual cog in a counter clockwise direction.
    This. If you don't have 2 chain whips, it is worth it to go buy another one just so you can use this method, it's seriously soooo much simpler.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Handlebar View Post
    Not to "hi-jack" here...but just FYI... There are a few companies out there, Novatech being one, making nice, light alloy freehub bodies with just one steel insert in one of the splines (Novatech calls it "Anti-Bite Guard"). Makes a steel contact point for any cassette and keeps the rest of the body from getting gouged.
    There's at least a few other hub manufacturers that have been doing that. Some folks have even rolled their own by filing down one of the splines and fitting a cut off nail or needle or similar in the space. You really only *need* it on one spline to essentially eliminate the issue.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    9
    Thanks, everyone...and yes, it's an I9 (Al hub) with an XT cassette (only the smallest two cogs are separate). Based on all the input, I've got an idea - person one holds the cassette in place with a chain whip and person two would lightly tap the hub body (after the two smaller cogs are removed) in the opposite direction, taking care to avoid damaging the hub body. Anyone tried this technique?

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jimw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    491
    Dude, seriously, just get 2 chain whips. Done. It is so dead simple to remove it that way that I don't even worry about this issue anymore (which used to drive me nuts). After removing the cassette, if it's been a while and the gouging is really bad, I'll file the splines a bit to smooth out the gouges, so that the cassette goes on smoothly. I swap my cassette between wheelsets a lot (AM and DH wheels; I use the same cassette because otherwise the cassettes wear at different rates causing drivetrain issues, so it's smoother to keep the entire drivetrain including cassette the same when swapping wheels). Prior to discovering the 2-chainwhip technique I used to dread swapping wheels, now it's no big deal.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    9
    okay - I got it, that would be easier; i'll pick up a second chain whip and let you know how it goes. Thanks.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,760
    Piece of old chain held with ViceGrips will work as a 2nd chain whip. Or even the old chain in a vice. Won't need much torque to unseat the cogs.

  14. #14
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    27,213
    Quote Originally Posted by Slash5 View Post
    Piece of old chain held with ViceGrips will work as a 2nd chain whip. Or even the old chain in a vice. Won't need much torque to unseat the cogs.
    Yeah, I've found I can use a metal tap and just tap the teeth in the opposite direction with a hammer and the tap. It's a pretty light amount of force and even though the cassette spins in this direction, it was plenty to loosen it up so I could get it off. No significant force was involved.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

Similar Threads

  1. Chain Stuck Between Cassette and Wheel
    By Hoomyster in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 05-15-2013, 10:56 AM
  2. Need some suggestions on buying a cassette.
    By Hiebs915 in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 11-19-2012, 06:21 PM
  3. Cassette Stuck on Drive Shell of DT 350 Hub
    By onepivot in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-22-2012, 02:40 PM
  4. SRAM cassette stuck on freehub
    By wv_bob in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-12-2012, 07:52 AM
  5. Cassette suggestions.
    By rsnake53 in forum Drivetrain - shifters, derailleurs, cranks
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-18-2011, 08:49 PM

Members who have read this thread: 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •