Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4

    strongest cassette

    i searched the forum and wasn't able to come up with anything relevant.

    i want to get a good cassette that won't wear out quickly. which make/model of 11-34 cassette is built to last a long time? price and weight not important.

  2. #2
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    13,857
    Cassette life is at least 75% related to how often you change your chain. If you keep the chain under the 0.5% stretch/wear, any decent cassette will last a long time.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  3. #3
    A Mountainside=My Therapy
    Reputation: ColoMtb20's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    136
    most of the durability has to do with the hub assembly, not so much the cassette.

  4. #4
    Vaginatarian
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,686
    shimano XT is pretty decent for the money
    if moneys no object you can get a full ti for $300 from action tec (individual cogs though so might tear up your freehub)

  5. #5
    Former Bike Wrench
    Reputation: mtnbiker72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15,985
    As mentioned above, cassette wear is directly related to your chain. Using the ruler method, if you replace at 12 1/16" you can get many miles on a cassette.

    I have found almost zero difference between Deore/PG 950 cassettes up to XT/PG 990 cassettes as far as wear. I have noticed an actual difference in chain wear from cheaper chains to better chains...and since chain wear is what kills cassettes, you should really be asking what is the longest wearing chains.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    4
    thanks for the informative posts everyone.

  7. #7
    A Mountainside=My Therapy
    Reputation: ColoMtb20's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    136
    Sorry I misunderstood your question.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    11,198
    Quote Originally Posted by rockyuphill
    Cassette life is at least 75% related to how often you change your chain. If you keep the chain under the 0.5% stretch/wear, any decent cassette will last a long time.

    Good lord I would blow through 20 chains a year if I changed a 0.5% wear...

    I run the chains out to 1% plus wear, I get about 3 to 5 chains per cassette...

    I run the shimano CN-7701 chain that I buy from jenson for $25 a pop....

    I run the shimano 4-part XTR cassette with the ti sprockets..Chain Reaction for about $150 a pop.

    Right now I use about 2.5 chains per year and a cassette lasts about 2 years...

    That is about 7500 km/yr of riding year round through the long cold salty winter.
    Last edited by jeffscott; 03-03-2010 at 08:36 AM.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    11,198
    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    As mentioned above, cassette wear is directly related to your chain. Using the ruler method, if you replace at 12 1/16" you can get many miles on a cassette.

    I have found almost zero difference between Deore/PG 950 cassettes up to XT/PG 990 cassettes as far as wear. I have noticed an actual difference in chain wear from cheaper chains to better chains...and since chain wear is what kills cassettes, you should really be asking what is the longest wearing chains.

    Keep hammering maybe everybody will believe you one day.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: damnitman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,284

    theoretically...

    ...speaking, do you want a chain that is stronger than the cassette (which would then wear the cassette to the chain) or do you want a cheap POS which wears to the chain to the cassette (a chain that you can afford to replace once a month)?
    If Huffy made an airplane, would you fly in it?

  11. #11
    Vaginatarian
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,686
    Quote Originally Posted by damnitman
    ...speaking, do you want a chain that is stronger than the cassette (which would then wear the cassette to the chain) or do you want a cheap POS which wears to the chain to the cassette (a chain that you can afford to replace once a month)?
    if that was the only problem with cheap chains you would have a valid point but what would the chain be made out of to be weaker than aluminum cogs in a cassette?
    and how strong would such a chain be?
    as it is
    you can buy a cheaper cassette that has steel cogs and you can buy a cassette that has all Ti cogs, but you're still spreading the wear over 9 cogs.
    replace your chain as soon as it wears to 1/16"-1/8" and your chain rings and cassette will last through many chains

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: damnitman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    1,284

    Hunh?

    I am admittedly not the most technically proficient guy around...but aluminum cogs in a cassette? They make alu carriers that hold the steel or ti cogs together, but I can't seem to recall any other alu components in a cassette...There are Alu chainrings up front, but they are typically heat-treated to increase hardness and resistance to wear...alu cassettes??? anybody wanna enlighten me?
    If Huffy made an airplane, would you fly in it?

  13. #13
    Vaginatarian
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    5,686
    Quote Originally Posted by damnitman
    I am admittedly not the most technically proficient guy around...but aluminum cogs in a cassette? They make alu carriers that hold the steel or ti cogs together, but I can't seem to recall any other alu components in a cassette...There are Alu chainrings up front, but they are typically heat-treated to increase hardness and resistance to wear...alu cassettes??? anybody wanna enlighten me?
    http://www.torontocycles.com/

    scroll down toward the bottom


    actually this is the only one I could find, except for road , Half asleep yet sorry, I editied my original post

  14. #14
    Former Bike Wrench
    Reputation: mtnbiker72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15,985
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    Keep hammering maybe everybody will believe you one day.
    I've said it before and I'll say it again...take your ignorance elsewhere, I have YEARS of experience over you and yet you continue to provide clueless and down right wrong answers.

    Grow up loser

  15. #15
    Underskilled
    Reputation: CaveGiant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    4,111
    If you had asked this question in the Clyde forum you would have got a string of answers.

    All of them being Shimano XT.

    Clydes (including me) can fold over the rings on high end SRAM, XT wears slowly and is VERY VERY strong.

    Can't do better from mainstream (exotics like Actiontek may be better, but ouchy price)

  16. #16
    Former Bike Wrench
    Reputation: mtnbiker72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15,985
    Quote Originally Posted by dan0
    http://www.torontocycles.com/

    scroll down toward the bottom


    actually this is the only one I could find, except for road , Half asleep yet sorry, I editied my original post
    Aluminum cassettes and Freewheels go back many years, Campy did them for road racing way back and Real was doing one piece CNC's 8 speed cassettes in the late 90's. It's basically a weight weenie thing for racing. Aluminum cassettes will not last long (most gears at least, larger 30,32,34,36t gears should be OK) but if your looking for the ultimate weight advantage, they provide an edge.

  17. #17
    I Have Cookies
    Reputation: ae111black's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    2,651
    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    I've said it before and I'll say it again...take your ignorance elsewhere, I have YEARS of experience over you and yet you continue to provide clueless and down right wrong answers.

    Grow up loser
    LOL!!
    The most important thing is what God thinks about it. He will have the final say. Joshua Stinebrink

    ____
    Kimo

  18. #18
    ballbuster
    Reputation: pimpbot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    12,629

    Yeah....

    Quote Originally Posted by jeepsrt8
    i searched the forum and wasn't able to come up with anything relevant.

    i want to get a good cassette that won't wear out quickly. which make/model of 11-34 cassette is built to last a long time? price and weight not important.
    I've had better luck with Shimano. I get years out of Shimano cassettes, where I would hardly get through one year on a SRAM before it would start sounding like a cement mixer back there. All the Shimanos are pretty much the same, except the XTR with has some Ti. Oddly enough, the Ti wears faster. The reason to go XTR is if you want to shed that last bit of weight.

  19. #19
    Former Bike Wrench
    Reputation: mtnbiker72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15,985
    Ti has 1/2 the density of steel so it actually makes sense that it would wear faster...it's also why on XTR it is only the 4 largest cogs are Ti. That said, I had a 8 speed XTR cassette with the Ti largest cogs that lasted YEARS with regular chain replacements.

  20. #20
    g3h6o3
    Reputation: PissedOffCil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    3,708
    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    Ti has 1/2 the density of steel so it actually makes sense that it would wear faster...it's also why on XTR it is only the 4 largest cogs are Ti. That said, I had a 8 speed XTR cassette with the Ti largest cogs that lasted YEARS with regular chain replacements.
    Not sure about how density really affects wear. It's not because a material weights less that it is less durable. I think you are confusing density and strength... I'm no expert so feel free to rectify.

    That said, yes ti wears faster than steel but not that much. Compared to alu though it's way more durable, yet the density of ti isn't that much more than alu.
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

  21. #21
    I Have Cookies
    Reputation: ae111black's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    2,651
    I pretty much only use Shimano cassettes now days, I'm a bug guy and I tend to break things (not so much any more) but fot your moneys worth I'd say stick with SLX or XT and you can't go wrong, (Strong=Cheap=Decent Weight)
    The most important thing is what God thinks about it. He will have the final say. Joshua Stinebrink

    ____
    Kimo

  22. #22
    Former Bike Wrench
    Reputation: mtnbiker72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15,985
    Quote Originally Posted by PissedOffCil
    Not sure about how density really affects wear. It's not because a material weights less that it is less durable. I think you are confusing density and strength... I'm no expert so feel free to rectify.

    That said, yes ti wears faster than steel but not that much. Compared to alu though it's way more durable, yet the density of ti isn't that much more than alu.
    If you used just raw Ti, it would wear much faster than steel. But manufacturers use Ti alloys such as 6Al/4V Titanium Alloy and then heat treat it to a very hard finish in chainrings and cogs, which makes them quite durable. This, more than the actual raw material, makes the chainrings and cassettes so expensive.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •