View Poll Results: Which do you prefer?

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  • SRAM

    122 57.55%
  • Shimano

    58 27.36%
  • Doesn't matter to me

    32 15.09%
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  1. #1
    Will work 4 Fisher's
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    SRAM or Shimano?

    Alright. Due to the controversy at this thread (Interesting POLL - XTR, XT, XO, X9.......) i have decided to start a poll. soo....yup.

    ~Shorty~

  2. #2
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    I voted Shimano simpley because I like the low-normal rear mechs. They just work better for my shifting style.

  3. #3
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    Hard to do a meaningful poll on this. I have both SRAM and Shimano on both of my bikes. I prefer SRAM for some components and Shimano for others. I suspect that this is true for many other riders as well.

  4. #4
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    The only thing Sram on my bike is the chain. Mainly cause I can get them cheaper at the store then a shimano of the same level. Everything else I prefer Shimano.
    Riding F/S since oct 94'

  5. #5
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    I'd have to agree, I really like the new low-normal Shimano stuff - makes perfect sense to me when shifting. Wouldn't mind trying some SRAM stuff but it's too expensive to have to switch shifters etc and then loose the low-normal shifting ontop of all that.
    Quote Originally Posted by jpick915
    I voted Shimano simpley because I like the low-normal rear mechs. They just work better for my shifting style.
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  6. #6
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    How About Neither As A Choice?

    I don't own anything SRAM (well some sachs stuff and a RS fork if you want to count stuff thats part of SRAM now), and only have a handful of Shimano parts between a half dozen bikes.
    *** --- *** --- ***

  7. #7
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    sram x.0 here. not even in the same ballpark as my old xt stuff. can't believe i put up with the way shimano shifted for so long.

    sram = butter!

  8. #8
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    full XTR here on a Seven

  9. #9
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    I went from a Deore/LX set up to almost a full X9 (I have an e-type front derailler). Granted, X9 is a higher level then what I came from, but the performance difference is HUGE. Shifting is much more pronounced, I cam dump 4 cogs in one shot, and I have only had to adjust the cables once this year compared to once a month with the Shimano. I also really like the thumb/thumb set up better than the thumb/finger.

    As always, this is just MHO.

  10. #10
    "Ride Lots" - Eddie Mercx
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    mostly SRAM now

    the only thing on the bike from the big S right now is the front derrailleur. my XTR shifters crapped out last year (they were old so I'm not holding that against the might S) and I went with SRAM X-9 triggers and an X-0 rear derrailleur.

    They performed better than my Shimano stuff ever did. Like I said, the XTR was old so it wasn't in current form but the SRAM shifting and rear derrailleur worked like a dream the minute I put it on. Part of the reason I went with SRAM is becuase I didn't want the arse backwards rear derrailleur and at the time, Shimano was pushing the dual control and not really indicating whether individual shifters would be available. the new XTR does look cool though so I"m not necessarily anti Shimano I just think SRAM works very, very well too.

    The shifting on the SRAM is very natural and it only took half a ride to get used to the differnt paddle operation.

    YR

  11. #11
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    Cassette-XTR, cuz it shifts well and relatively strong
    Chain-SRAM cuz the powerlink is oh so handy
    Rear derailleur-SRAM XO cuz it shifts so crisply
    Shifters-SRAM all thumbs is better for me, brake/shift at the sme time if I want.
    Front Der.-XTR cuz there is nothing better out right now.

    I want to convert all my bike to SRAM if I had the cash

  12. #12
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    -The X.0 triggers and rear derailleur are amazing. Crisp doesn't even begin to describe how clean and fast these things shift. If you can afford them, get them. Shimano's got nothing on them right now.

    -SRAM doesn't even try to compete in the front derailleur market, and the XT and XTR are slick. Shimano all the way, baby.

    -The cassettes are kind of a toss-up, but I like the XT since it's lighter than SRAM's best cassette and it's practically bulletproof.

    -I broke a Shimano chain out on the trail last week and I remembered how much of a PITA it is to change them. The SRAM chains take less than two minutes to put on and SRAM chains are also lighter. I gave away my spare XTR chains and replaced them with SRAM.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by TLud
    The SRAM chains take less than two minutes to put on and SRAM chains are also lighter.
    Yeah right. Removing links from either chain takes about the same amount of time.

    You should have given me your spare XTR chains.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  14. #14
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    i like shimano except for chains i like sram. however both my current bikes have shimano chains--when i replace it will be sram.

  15. #15
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    I have a complete SRAM XO drivetrain except the front mech and it has worked better than the XTR setup it replaced.

  16. #16
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    SRAM X.0 triggers & RD, XTR FD, SRAM cassette. Blows AWAY my previous all XT setup. Couldn't be happier!

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by TLud
    Hard to do a meaningful poll on this. I have both SRAM and Shimano on both of my bikes. I prefer SRAM for some components and Shimano for others. I suspect that this is true for many other riders as well.

    The only Shimano stuff I absolutely hate are rear hubs,,, Everything else is kind of a toss-up. XO is clearly the best shifting setup, but the price is

  18. #18
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    I prefer SRAM but only just. The differences are so minor it's about 52% to 48%.

  19. #19
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    I can understand why people buy the high end RD's 'cause you use them so much throughout a ride, but don't understand why they spend that sort of cash for a FD when it's used so very little during a ride - I mean any properly adjusted FD will shift down smoothly in a pinch, it's nothing like a RD's workload. Maybe I just am cheap, watch where I'm going and pick my gears before I need them and watch my shifting - I don't shift under load unless absolutely neccessary and then I "soft pedal" a 1/2 stroke to make the change.

    Quote Originally Posted by Magick Mountain
    SRAM X.0 triggers & RD, XTR FD, SRAM cassette. Blows AWAY my previous all XT setup. Couldn't be happier!
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx
    I can understand why people buy the high end RD's 'cause you use them so much throughout a ride, but don't understand why they spend that sort of cash for a FD when it's used so very little during a ride - I mean any properly adjusted FD will shift down smoothly in a pinch, it's nothing like a RD's workload. Maybe I just am cheap, watch where I'm going and pick my gears before I need them and watch my shifting - I don't shift under load unless absolutely neccessary and then I "soft pedal" a 1/2 stroke to make the change.
    Yeah. Deore FDs are great, cost about $15, and are about the same weight as the XTRs.

  21. #21
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    My HT has XT shifters and an LX front derailleur; my FS has X.0 shifters and an XT front derailleur. The FD shifting on my FS is worlds better than on my HT, and I don't think the difference is all due to the shifters.
    Last edited by TLud; 07-05-2006 at 09:19 AM.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Yeah right. Removing links from either chain takes about the same amount of time.

    You should have given me your spare XTR chains.
    Removing links isn't the hard part.

  23. #23
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    And Powerlinks are still way easier than using a chain tool and pins. I like Sram chains, but use Shimano everything else.

  24. #24
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    I run all Shimano. I may put a 12-26 PG970 cassette on my road bike, but that's it. I tried X9 triggers with an X0 rear and didn't like it. I like rapid rise best. I do run an XT pod and Ultegra rear on the urban bike. I prefer DA/XTR chains, but use sram power links on the chains. I don't like Sram chains like some folks do. If I don't run Shimano I run KMC or IRD.

  25. #25
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    Funny that I read this and more folks seem to like Shimano better, but Sram is leading. Do people that like Sram not have a reason or something?

  26. #26
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    I don't like Rapid Rise BTW. Too slow downshifting for my taste.

  27. #27
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    I destroyed a set of gripshift in 1996, replaced it with XTR and it is still going strong today.

    Anyone have anything from sram over 5 years old that isn't broken?

    Also, for the money, you can't beat a Shimano hub...unless you ride trials.

  28. #28
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by TLud
    Removing links isn't the hard part.
    No, but it's the part that takes the most time, since you were talking about time.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  29. #29
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    I wont even touch shimano anymore. I used to have so many headaches with adjusting derailers and shifters and ghostshifts... Ughh... I was running a full xt drivetrain, and switched to sram x9 triggers. The difference is night and day. I have not had one single problem with the sram equipped bike. the 1:1 ratio over the 2:1 alone is worth it to go with sram. shifts are so much more crisp, acurate, and consistent.
    "What would happen to the Weather Channel's ratings if people werent scared anymore?"

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    No, but it's the part that takes the most time, since you were talking about time.
    He meant that putting a Shimano chain back together is a PITA, and I have to agree.

  31. #31
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    I have SRAM MRX gripshifts on my bike that have been there since the bike was new in 1998 and they still work fine. I am looking to upgrade to the X.0 now since I am going to go to a 9 speed rear cassette and ditch the 7.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardtails Are Better
    He meant that putting a Shimano chain back together is a PITA, and I have to agree.
    Well, putting a powerlink in the shimano chain is a breeze.

    For those of you willing to work for a stronger interface than is possible with a powerlink/sram chain, install the supplied pin with the shimano chain.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  33. #33
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    I have quite a mix of kit on my 3 bikes.

    All SRAM chains, as I find they last better then Shimano, and there's none of the special pin garbage.

    Shimano cassettes as I find they last better than SRAM - both wear and bending from collision damage

    I use Blackspire chainrings as Shimano ones wear out too quickly

    Rear mechs - I have a mixture, but much prefer the SRAM X7, both for positive shifting and also the much cleaner cable entry.

    Front mechs - all Shimano simply because I haven't replaced one for ages

    Shifters - I prefer the positive action and thumb-thumb action of SRAM, the only downside I've found is that the long lever (certainly on X9 and rocket) can bend if you smack your knee hard enough against it, and it's a SOB to straighten...

    Alaric.

  34. #34
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    I had ridden an XT/XTR equipped bike for years, but went SRAM on my new bike and don't know if I'll go back. My current setup is as follows:

    XT Front Derailleur
    X.O. Rear Derailleur
    X.O. Twist Shifter (Front)
    X.O. Trigger Shirter (Rear)
    XT Cassette
    Dura Ace/XTR CN-7701 9 spd chain

    It's turned out to be quite a nice mix. I was trying to keep the weight and the price of the drivetrain down, so I went with the XT cassette and the Shimano chain. The shifting is quick and precise on the X.O. rear, and I really like the adjustable two thumb paddle design of the X.O. trigger shifter. The twist/trigger shifter mix is the best part of the drivetrain though. On my old bike, I'd just have to put up with the annoying grating of chain rub in some gears, but no more, a simple click of the twist shifter and the chain rub is gone.

  35. #35
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    SRAM X5 grip shift, X5 rear derailleur, SRAM 11-32 8 speed cassette, PC58 chain, and a Shimano Deore front derailleur.

    A budget system that works incredibly well--and the super-weak 9-speed chain is absent.

    Why SRAM?
    Shimano's funny-looking front derailleur is devine. Everything else Shimano got itself evicted due to maintenance and heavy weight.
    With SRAM, the bike is nearly a pound lighter, the components cost less, and it is trouble-free. Gear changes are almost gearhub quality in smoothness. Rear derailleur/chain drag is far less than with Shimano.

    Surprisingly, the PC58 chain isn't as good as Shimano's lowly HG70, but it is nice.

  36. #36
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    sram x7 front on sram x gen, sram attack on XT rear D. sram cassette and chain. Works very well, much prefer the thumb shifting of sram. Less exposed to damage with the indicators, and, easy to change the cables. Hard to go back to shimano shifters once you get used to sram.

  37. #37
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    Well this poll is looking very definitive, SRAM is definitely the popular choice NAH with a whopping 92 votes compared to 8446 on the MTBR official poll, I think I'll go with that cross section I'm no SRAM hater, I just have Shimano and it works for cheap.
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  38. #38
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    Sram X9 all the way, with twist grips. I still have a Shimano XT cassette and front mech on one of my bikes. I think Shimano lost the plot with the combined brake/gear levers.
    Remember, there is no black magic or witchcraft, it's only a machine

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx
    Well this poll is looking very definitive, SRAM is definitely the popular choice NAH with a whopping 92 votes compared to 8446 on the MTBR official poll, I think I'll go with that cross section I'm no SRAM hater, I just have Shimano and it works for cheap.
    Mass market high volume heavily marketed stuff always comes out on top in this kind of poll. I'm not a Shimano hater either, but I prefer Sram shifters and mechs.
    Remember, there is no black magic or witchcraft, it's only a machine

  40. #40
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    I think the winner will be the first to come up with a new drivetrain system completely different from what we are using, ie internal geared or hydro shifting. There is only so much you can do to a chain and cassete to make it any better

  41. #41
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    I voted shimano, finger/thumb is better than double thumb IMHO

    And given MHO is always right I suppose Shimano is better

    Except Shimano chains (there so damn easy to break! grrrr)

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by forceyoda
    I think the winner will be the first to come up with a new drivetrain system completely different from what we are using, ie internal geared or hydro shifting. There is only so much you can do to a chain and cassete to make it any better
    I agree, but not so easy or everyone would be doing it!! Hydraulic shifting would be awesome, but you really need a hydraulic pump and accumulator, neither of which are feasible to drive on a bike. Perhaps you could do it with a simple hydraulic line working against a spring and ratchet?

    I guess the ultimate would be a CVT of some kind, so you wouldn't need any shifters at all. I digress. For now it's Sram X9 for me
    Remember, there is no black magic or witchcraft, it's only a machine

  43. #43
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    Don't know how you guys manage to break these chains I've been running HG53 chains since last year October and haven't managed to break one yet - they suck at getting rust on them very easily, but never broke one. I do use the SRAM Powerlink though - damn fine system.
    Quote Originally Posted by Australia
    Except Shimano chains (there so damn easy to break! grrrr)
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  44. #44
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    I dunno. But I've had a horrible time breaking chains from all the brands I've tried. I broke two in races last year. One Shimano, one Sram. Broke a couple more on regular rides. I'm not very big either. 5'11". 130#. I've got a Wipperman on one of my bikes that seems to be holding up better. Damn expensive though.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx
    Don't know how you guys manage to break these chains
    When many people say that they broke shimano chains and switched to SRAM, they are talking about many years ago when the shimano chains were fairly inferior to the SRAM (actually Sachs) chains. Shimano has since changed them, and now has a much stronger and more reliable chain. Many people have that "bad taste" left in their mouth, or they simply don't install the special pin correctly, they just push in a pin that they pushed out, and that usually leads to failure. I haven't had a shimano chain fail since about 2001 or so, whenever they came out with the newer dura-ace/xtr chain, and since then they've applied the same design to all of their chains. I have had Sram chains fail since that time, but back in the day they were better than the equivalant shimano product.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardtails Are Better
    I dunno. But I've had a horrible time breaking chains from all the brands I've tried. I broke two in races last year. One Shimano, one Sram. Broke a couple more on regular rides. I'm not very big either. 5'11". 130#. I've got a Wipperman on one of my bikes that seems to be holding up better. Damn expensive though.
    You're obviously doing something wrong if you've managed to break 4 chains in a single year!
    Remember, there is no black magic or witchcraft, it's only a machine

  47. #47
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    Well since this has turned into a chain thread I might as well throw in my 2c. First of all as mentioned above. If you're constantly breaking chains, you're doing something wrong. An sram chain is not better than a shimano chain because of a powerlink. A powerlink works just as well on a shimano chain (even if Sram says it don't) if you so wish to use it instead of the special connector pin. Installation time is the same given you compare the same installation method. Powerlinks are quite as notorious for failing as imporperly installed shimano pins. Properly installed the shimano pins provide the strongest joint comparable to a factory pressed pin. For the last 5 or 6 years all Shimano chains have been hammered and mushroom towards the ends to keep the plates from slipping off. Anytime you see a shimano chain failure notice 95% of the time its at the splice joint, not the factory pins. Sram chains typically break at random links. I think recently Sram has finally started stamping out the pin ends of their chains.

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Many people have that "bad taste" left in their mouth, or they simply don't install the special pin correctly, they just push in a pin that they pushed out, and that usually leads to failure.
    Exactly. I've noticed a lot of people reusing the factory pressed pins. The mushroomed tip will actually cut off a chunk from the plate when its push back through leaving an oversized hole that is not making any press fit with the pin. Anyone can test this themselves. Get a few links of shimano chain, press a pin off a plate and repress it back in. You'll see the metal shaving it carved out of the plate opening as it oversized it. The special connector pin is specifically sized and grooved to account for this expansion.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by uktrailmonster
    You're obviously doing something wrong if you've managed to break 4 chains in a single year!
    One was a brand new SRAM chain, very first ride. I shortened it to length, put the PowerLink on, and on a out of saddle effort on a steep climb it snapped. That was one of the race ones. One wasn't really my fault I'd say, but kind of unsurprising. I got a stick in my RD, which spun it around, and the chain got wedged between the dropout and casette. One of the links got twisted, and since I'd forgotten my chain tool at home, all I could do was stick a pair of allen wrenches into the neighboring links and twist it back. That link broke on an out of the saddle effort a few miles later. One was like the first, except that that the chain was about 100 miles old. That's the other race one. And the last one the chain was really old and probably should have been replaced already. That was on my commuter bike, and was the only Shimano of the four. I hadn't moved any of the pins on any of them except to shorten them to fit. The Shimano didn't fail at the pin that I inserted.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardtails Are Better
    One was a brand new SRAM chain, very first ride. I shortened it to length, put the PowerLink on, and on a out of saddle effort on a steep climb it snapped. That was one of the race ones. One wasn't really my fault I'd say, but kind of unsurprising. I got a stick in my RD, which spun it around, and the chain got wedged between the dropout and casette. One of the links got twisted, and since I'd forgotten my chain tool at home, all I could do was stick a pair of allen wrenches into the neighboring links and twist it back. That link broke on an out of the saddle effort a few miles later. One was like the first, except that that the chain was about 100 miles old. That's the other race one. And the last one the chain was really old and probably should have been replaced already. That was on my commuter bike, and was the only Shimano of the four. I hadn't moved any of the pins on any of them except to shorten them to fit. The Shimano didn't fail at the pin that I inserted.
    Perhaps you over-shortened it? Maybe there's something wrong with your rear mech? Or you could be just very unlucky!!
    Remember, there is no black magic or witchcraft, it's only a machine

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