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  1. #1
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    Spring Type: Top-Normal Question

    Does top-normal mean the rear der spring pulls the der to the smallest cog?

    I want to try a different rear der. Bike runnin' no big ring, 32 tooth middle ring + 11-34 cassette. I plan to try the 2008 Shimano Deore XT M772 Shadow Rear Derailleur GS. But I want to be certain the rear der shifts in the "conventional old-fashioned" manner.

    Thanks for the help,
    Terry

  2. #2
    thecentralscrutinizer
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    Quote Originally Posted by elder_mtber
    Does top-normal mean the rear der spring pulls the der to the smallest cog?

    I want to try a different rear der. Bike runnin' no big ring, 32 tooth middle ring + 11-34 cassette. I plan to try the 2008 Shimano Deore XT M772 Shadow Rear Derailleur GS. But I want to be certain the rear der shifts in the "conventional old-fashioned" manner.

    Thanks for the help,
    Terry
    Yes it does.
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  3. #3
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    Can one use a low-normal (rapid-rise) rear derailleur on one that is currently using a top-normal derailleur? How can I tell which way my derailleur is now (Shimano Alivio)? Advantages of each? Current setup is a Trek 4300 that I'm upgrading to the 9 speed drivetrain, and virtually all other parts were upgraded last year. I ride fairly aggressive XC on Colorado's front range, lots of technical, long, sustained climbs, if it makes a difference.

    Thanks!

  4. #4
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    rapid rise goes to the bigger rear cogs when releasing the cable , normal goes to the smaller. trigger the shifter with your finger to the end or just unhook your cable to see.
    I believe rapid rise is only available on xt & xtr derailliers, and not on shadow (yet I hope)
    I just got a shadow and while I like it , I miss rapid rise

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the tip, Dan...however, I'm going to be upgrading to new 9 speed xt shifters at the same time...so is rapid rise the way to go on this one?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockeater
    Thanks for the tip, Dan...however, I'm going to be upgrading to new 9 speed xt shifters at the same time...so is rapid rise the way to go on this one?
    I do, I have 2 bikes with RR, 1 with xt and 1 with xtr. I think they recommend RR with dual only because with the click shifters (xtr especially) you get 3 gears with your thumb and 2 with the finger, xt is 2 & 2 I believe.
    anyway, as soon as they make a shadow RR Im buying, untill then I'll just have to re learn "normal" shift

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by dan0
    I think they recommend RR with dual only because with the click shifters (xtr especially) you get 3 gears with your thumb and 2 with the finger, xt is 2 & 2 I believe.
    When you say "dual only," you're referring to "dual control" levers, correct? If so, I think Shimano's "recommendations" are just a marketing thing. A lot of people complained about Shimano ONLY offering Rapid Rise derailleurs for their newer models, so Shimano responded by bringing back the traditional spring design in new derailleur models, and "recommending" this for the trigger shifters. Frankly, I think that this recommendation is a mistake. I use RR with XT shifters and it works great -- I wouldn't want it any other way.

    It's a completely subjective decision, but personally I would always recommend RR derailleurs regardless of the shifter type being used. I think that the only reason so many people rejected the RR design was because they weren't used to it, and it feels pretty strange at first. Once you acclimate to it, however, it seems totally natural. If this was the way shifting was originally introduced, I believe that people would reject high-normal with just as much vehemence (if not more.)

    Larry

  8. #8
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    Yeah, I'm not a big fan of dual-control in any way...just getting the xt triggers...pretty sure I'm going to pair it with the RR, guess we'll see what happens.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by lalittle
    When you say "dual only," you're referring to "dual control" levers, correct? If so, I think Shimano's "recommendations" are just a marketing thing. A lot of people complained about Shimano ONLY offering Rapid Rise derailleurs for their newer models, so Shimano responded by bringing back the traditional spring design in new derailleur models, and "recommending" this for the trigger shifters. Frankly, I think that this recommendation is a mistake. I use RR with XT shifters and it works great -- I wouldn't want it any other way.

    It's a completely subjective decision, but personally I would always recommend RR derailleurs regardless of the shifter type being used. I think that the only reason so many people rejected the RR design was because they weren't used to it, and it feels pretty strange at first. Once you acclimate to it, however, it seems totally natural. If this was the way shifting was originally introduced, I believe that people would reject high-normal with just as much vehemence (if not more.)

    Larry
    excactly right

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