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Thread: Snapping chains

  1. #1
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    Snapping chains

    So yesterday i broke my 3rd chain since the beginning of last season . granted i just got a different bike this season and the chain certainly wasnt new, but is it just that i havent had strong chains? or could there be an underlying issue? and if it is just that i need a stronger chain, what is the strongest chain for a 9spd? ive tried to look it up myself but i cant find real specifics about it. thanks for the help!

  2. #2
    It's about showing up.
    Reputation: Berkeley Mike's Avatar
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    I broke 3 bats once in one afternoon of baseball practice

    It wasn't the bats.

  3. #3
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    Keep it clean? That helps keep the wear to a minimum.

  4. #4
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    What brand of chain, what model of chain, do you re-use the pin, how do your measure chain length, what do you use to cut the chain with, what condition how old are the rings and cassette, what is your chainline, do you crosschain, do you shift under power. All this factors into your question.

  5. #5
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    It's not the chains, It's you.

    There are no stronger chains, at least not enough to solve your problem. Chains are incredibly strong and if you're having problems you need to find out why.

    There are 3 major causes of broken chains.

    1- bad closures when using pin replacement systems. If you're not good with chain tools, buy a chain that uses a closure link, such as SRAM or Wippermann.
    2- poor shifting technique. Today's gated sprocket shifting systems (hyperglide, or other name) make it way too easy to shift under load. This puts tremendous bending and twisting loads onto chains forcing the outer plates outward beyond the ends of the pins. If you frequently shift under load, you'll pay for it with broken chains. Try to anticipate gear changes and shift sooner, or reduce pedal pressure during shifting to avoid jamming the chain.
    3- chain suck, or other things that jam the chain. While the chain can support a ton under pure tension, it doesn't tolerate bending very well. Jamming the chain between the inner ring and the chainstay, bends the plates and tremendously weakens the chain leading to failure down the road.

    With decent care and good riding style, even the least expensive chain should last until it wears out, and that can be pushed back with decent lubrication.
    fb
    www.chain-L.com

    The key to solving any problem is to understand and address the underlying cause.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY
    There are no stronger chains, ....
    Not too sure about that. When I only weighed 165 lbs (packed on a few lbs since) I broke 2 pc-1, one on the first ride and the other in 2 rides, switched to a pc-68 and still using that chain.

    Used to bend/twist or break pc-59/951 in about 300-500 miles, switched to only using pc-971 or above and (9sp) chains lasts the normal (for me) 1k mi.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY
    1- bad closures when using pin replacement systems. If you're not good with chain tools, buy a chain that uses a closure link, such as SRAM or Wippermann.
    That is how I broke the two chains that I have managed to break: bad joint, one by me, one by LBS.

    Other issues that have been mentioned are worth a look too.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by FBinNY
    There are no stronger chains, at least not enough to solve your problem. Chains are incredibly strong and if you're having problems you need to find out why.

    There are 3 major causes of broken chains.

    1- bad closures when using pin replacement systems. If you're not good with chain tools, buy a chain that uses a closure link, such as SRAM or Wippermann.
    2- poor shifting technique. Today's gated sprocket shifting systems (hyperglide, or other name) make it way too easy to shift under load. This puts tremendous bending and twisting loads onto chains forcing the outer plates outward beyond the ends of the pins. If you frequently shift under load, you'll pay for it with broken chains. Try to anticipate gear changes and shift sooner, or reduce pedal pressure during shifting to avoid jamming the chain.
    3- chain suck, or other things that jam the chain. While the chain can support a ton under pure tension, it doesn't tolerate bending very well. Jamming the chain between the inner ring and the chainstay, bends the plates and tremendously weakens the chain leading to failure down the road.

    With decent care and good riding style, even the least expensive chain should last until it wears out, and that can be pushed back with decent lubrication.
    What he said +1

    I ride with some people that I can hear every shift they make. Cachunk!!!!!!! Do a couple pedal strokes with a slight burst of speed, then let off as you shift and no one will hear a thing. Time the shift for a flatter spot of the hill where you can make the shift, and get back on it again after it shifts.

  9. #9
    ~Disc~Golf~
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    Quote Originally Posted by Berkeley Mike
    It wasn't the bats.
    haha! Nice One
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by twowheelsdown2002
    What he said +1

    I ride with some people that I can hear every shift they make. Cachunk!!!!!!!

    I always thought it sounded more like "carunchunk-doink".

    But however you spell it, it spells doom for your chain.
    fb
    www.chain-L.com

    The key to solving any problem is to understand and address the underlying cause.

  11. #11
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    My brother used to do this. Partly (well more like mostly) it was due to poor chain closure when putting the chain back together. The other part was due to his inability to downshift and instead power mash the pedals up climbs. We started using sram powerlinks and since using them he hasn't broken another chain. It cost a little more but we use powerlinks for every chain now.

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