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  1. #1
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    should i go 8 spd?

    I have been hearing more and more about the advantages of going 8 speed instead of 9. Better shifting, more reliable under adverse conditions, lighter?. I am building up a Dean scout and am considering going this way. Does any one have any experience with this?

  2. #2
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    i have 8 spd, i like it, although the acera (shich im upgrading) sucks, but its strong. i had a crash on a trail that would've shredded an XTR, but theres only major scratches and dents on the Acera.

    i might also upgrade to a 9 spd. chain for more clearance for derailleurs.

  3. #3
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    If anything, the XTR rear derailer is a stronger part than its cheaper Shimano brethren (Forged parts vs die cast parts).

    Also, I think you want an 8 speed chain on an 8 speed cassette and 9 on a 9 speed cassette obviously. They're designed to mesh and shift better with the proper width chain.

  4. #4
    JmZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by tootsjofus
    I have been hearing more and more about the advantages of going 8 speed instead of 9. Better shifting, more reliable under adverse conditions, lighter?. I am building up a Dean scout and am considering going this way. Does any one have any experience with this?

    As much as I'm loathe to say this... Mountain Bike Action is doing a series of articles of devolution - from 9 to 8 speed.

    I'm an 8 speed hold out, so I don't know the 'advantages' of 9 speed first hand, but I have not felt the need to upgrade for 2 more teeth on the rear cog. The 34 tooth rear cog has been the only excuse that I've heard that I can accept.

    JmZ
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by JmZ
    As much as I'm loathe to say this... Mountain Bike Action is doing a series of articles of devolution - from 9 to 8 speed.

    I'm an 8 speed hold out, so I don't know the 'advantages' of 9 speed first hand, but I have not felt the need to upgrade for 2 more teeth on the rear cog. The 34 tooth rear cog has been the only excuse that I've heard that I can accept.

    JmZ
    Ditto. I don't know if it's necessarily lighter but it's definitely a more mud/muck tolerant system. 9 speed offers some closer ratios (not noticeable off-road), smaller chainrings and larger cogs. I use a 12-32 XTR cassette with the bottom three cogs off an XT 11-30. This gives me a wide enough range at 11-32. I have recently downsized my cranks to compact but stuck with a 34T middle ring. If I wanted to slightly lower gearing, I can go to a 32T middle ring. The only real trouble with 8 speed is finding high end cassettes.
    Long Live Long Rides

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by tootsjofus
    I have been hearing more and more about the advantages of going 8 speed instead of 9. Better shifting, more reliable under adverse conditions, lighter?. I am building up a Dean scout and am considering going this way. Does any one have any experience with this?
    I prefer 8spd. I think it works better. The problem is finding quality 8spd parts. Shimano no longer makes higher end 8spd shifters, derailers, etc...

  7. #7
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    Look at how much MBA spent to convert a 9-speed back to 8-speed. Not worth the cost IMHO.
    Want to ride in this life and the next? Ask me how.

  8. #8
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    If 8 speed parts were more plentiful it could be worth considering. With their scarcity its simply more of a hassle than its worth for whats really not that big of a deal. Get your 9 speed tuned right and it will work just fine.

    Quote Originally Posted by ANdRewLIu6294
    i have 8 spd, i like it, although the acera (shich im upgrading) sucks, but its strong. i had a crash on a trail that would've shredded an XTR, but theres only major scratches and dents on the Acera.

    i might also upgrade to a 9 spd. chain for more clearance for derailleurs.
    A forged XTR will have a much higher chance of surviving an impact than a POS die cast Acera. The only thing more durable than an XTR is maybe the Saint or Hone.

  9. #9
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    im probably gonna go 9 spd later, once i get the money. and the 9 spd chain is for more clearance for the 9spd fron derailleur.

    i dont see any big important differences between the two unless you care about weight, but alot of 8 spd derailleurs and cheap and heavy

  10. #10
    JmZ
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    Agreed, but will it cost me that much?

    They factored in a few things that most of us mere mortals don't always have to fend with. The biggest one being swapping out disc brakes.

    Otherwise it takes a shifter, and a rear cassette. Cassettes are still out there, you just have to look. There are <i>a few</i> shops that would rather push the latest and greatest on ya than stock older stuff.

    And jus FYI - Cassettes are available at Performance in the XT and XTR level. (even the Ti XTR's)
    - Bikeman
    - AEBike

    Mechs are a non issue. 8 and 9 work the same.

    Shifters are the only real issue, and XT's are still available, and if you want to pay the price there were some XTR's that have been available at Cambria or Jenson too.

    JmZ

    Quote Originally Posted by paddlefoot64
    Look at how much MBA spent to convert a 9-speed back to 8-speed. Not worth the cost IMHO.
    JmZ

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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by tootsjofus
    I have been hearing more and more about the advantages of going 8 speed instead of 9. Better shifting, more reliable under adverse conditions, lighter?. I am building up a Dean scout and am considering going this way. Does any one have any experience with this?
    IMO, 8 speed is superior to 9 speed but availability forces you to 9 speed. I ran 8 speed until this summer when I got tired of having to use ebay to find any decent 8 speed parts, shifters are the hardest thing to find, chains and cassettes are still available, albeit heavy ones, but LX or better shifters are not there and thus get a premium price even on ebay because everyone must be having the same problem. So I upgraded to 9 speed. I maintain my own bikes and never had such a heck of a time getting the shifting to work as with the 8 to 9 speed upgrade. I figured out my derail hanger was bent, it didn't matter with the 8 speed but with the 9 speed half of the lower gears were not useable. It's very sensitive compared to 8 speed and I don't see any advantages of the 1 extra ring. I then setup an old frame with my used 8 speed parts and had it shifting great within a normal amount of time even with a screwed up chainline 'cause I was using a e-type BB with standard top pull clamp mount derail which I had to put under a lot of tension to line up the little ring.

  12. #12
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    too bad 8 speed is so unavailable

    Seems I post every month or so about how much I like my XTR 8 speed. Too bad high end 8-and-9 speed systems aren't manufactured along side each other so the consumer could choose based on their own desires not what's available. I've heard (and believe strongly) that if Shimano just started making 1998 XTR 8 speed (shifter/brake and cassette, this time with a 34 top cog) they'd be best-sellers. Others above have noted that cheap 8 speed combinations are sort of readily available (I don't know) so who knows how well cheap 8 speed works?

  13. #13
    JmZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcguy
    Seems I post every month or so about how much I like my XTR 8 speed. Too bad high end 8-and-9 speed systems aren't manufactured along side each other so the consumer could choose based on their own desires not what's available. I've heard (and believe strongly) that if Shimano just started making 1998 XTR 8 speed (shifter/brake and cassette, this time with a 34 top cog) they'd be best-sellers. Others above have noted that cheap 8 speed combinations are sort of readily available (I don't know) so who knows how well cheap 8 speed works?
    There are still quality parts out there, the problem is that it isn't easily found and can be expensive.

    I just got one of the bike rags this week and advertised in there were at least two places with XTR shifter brake levers (Cambria and Jenson).
    XT stuff is still being shown at a bunch of places. I just checked Cambria, and I'm pretty sure Bikeman, and several others have the shifters.
    SRAM's got up to their X-7 level of triggers with 8 speeds. It isn't XO, but considering they were not going to do triggers at all at first, it is still notable. And they've got Shimmy compatable ones too.

    http://www.cambriabike.com/shopexd.asp?id=9253
    http://www.cambriabike.com/shopexd.asp?id=12254
    http://www.cambriabike.com/shopexd.asp?id=17264

    Just 2 mins from Cambria.

    http://www.bikemannetwork.com/biking...ETSRAM1/LD4026
    http://www.bikemannetwork.com/biking...ETSRAM1/LD4016
    http://www.bikemannetwork.com/biking...NSETSH1/LD8410
    http://aebike.com/site/page.cfm?PageID=30&SKU=LD8410
    http://aebike.com/site/page.cfm?PageID=30&SKU=LD4016
    http://aebike.com/site/page.cfm?PageID=30&SKU=LD4026

    There are still options out there... but you have to dig.

    Cassettes have been available at Cambria, Performance, Nashbar at XT level or above. The SRAM 850 version is competitive in weight, and <b>much</b> better in price. I've got one so far... The SRAM stuff is more readily available than the Shimano stuff, but even the Shimano stuff is out there.

    If you want to go 8 speed... it can be done, and it can be done for a reasonable cost too... it just isn't advertised on the first pages of the newest Colorado Cyclist, Jenson, Pricepoint or Beyone Bike catalogs. The only parts to really worry about are the shifters and cassettes. The rear mecs and front mechs will work with 8 or 9. I didn't even touch on the Paul's thumbies either.

    Good luck,

    JmZ
    Last edited by JmZ; 10-14-2005 at 11:46 AM. Reason: Linkage to Some Triggers
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  14. #14
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    I would go back to 8spd in a hearbeat. But I find the one part that is very hard to find is the trigger shifters. I have never seen sram triggers in 8spd (I hate grip shifters so thats not an option). The only decent shimano triggers in 8spd are hard to find older models. Most of wich have the brakes attached and won't work with my hydro brakes. Then if you do go to 8spd and your triggers break, they are not repairable. We need a major manufacturer (trek, cannondale, specialized) to take a stand and stock their whole line with 8spd. The revolution starts now!

  15. #15
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    8 speed parts

    I had to deal with this issue recently. My street bike is an 8 speed, and I upgraded a lot of the components, sticking with the 8 speed drivetrain. I purchased integrated XT 8 speed shifter/brake levers, and cassette. I'm running Gold series LX 9 speed f/r derailleurs with no problems. I did, however, purchase a spare cassette and chain (as well as spare Gold LX derailleurs, as they are hard to come by) in order to keep the 8 speed for the life of the bike. If the shifters go, I'm probably screwed. With that said, there are still vendors out there who supply these hard to get parts. Jones Bike in California even still has 6 and 7 speed stuff.

    My advice, buy multiple parts and horde them.

    Bob
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  16. #16
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    How can we force the gruppo manufacturers

    to offer us the option of high-end 8 speed, readily available. Sheeit, folks, at the auto dealer we got our choice of auto or manual! I never understood the 9 speed concept except for the 34 in back (I always point out to my riding partners how during a ridiculously steep climb they're grinding away in a lower granny than my granny). Us 8 speed retroriders know the "superiority" of our drivetrain (ok, I'm exagerating but my 7 years of perfect shifting has to count for something!). The 9 speed riders, constantly fooling around with their drivetrain (so I've heard, I got no experience with 9 speed) don't know what they're missing. Is there a way to "force" Shimano or SRAM to begin manufacturing high-end 8 speed? They are always innovating to keep the interest of new riders, how can we get them to offer 8 speed as something new and exciting?

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcguy
    Seems I post every month or so about how much I like my XTR 8 speed. Too bad high end 8-and-9 speed systems aren't manufactured along side each other so the consumer could choose based on their own desires not what's available. I've heard (and believe strongly) that if Shimano just started making 1998 XTR 8 speed (shifter/brake and cassette, this time with a 34 top cog) they'd be best-sellers. Others above have noted that cheap 8 speed combinations are sort of readily available (I don't know) so who knows how well cheap 8 speed works?
    i've tried Alivio, it shifts WAY to rough, it was adjusted correctly too (this was on a freind's bike).

    I'm absolutely LOVING my Acera w/ Avid Rollamajig, its shifts really fast, quiet, and smooth, you can hardly feel it. it shifted like crap before the Avid part though.


    Quote Originally Posted by xcguy
    to offer us the option of high-end 8 speed, readily available. Sheeit, folks, at the auto dealer we got our choice of auto or manual! I never understood the 9 speed concept except for the 34 in back (I always point out to my riding partners how during a ridiculously steep climb they're grinding away in a lower granny than my granny). Us 8 speed retroriders know the "superiority" of our drivetrain (ok, I'm exagerating but my 7 years of perfect shifting has to count for something!). The 9 speed riders, constantly fooling around with their drivetrain (so I've heard, I got no experience with 9 speed) don't know what they're missing. Is there a way to "force" Shimano or SRAM to begin manufacturing high-end 8 speed? They are always innovating to keep the interest of new riders, how can we get them to offer 8 speed as something new and exciting?
    petitions?

  18. #18
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    sram conversion questions...

    I think I'm going to tackle this conversion on my Burner....

    Would it cause any problems for me to continue using the X.9 rear, LX M-571 front, and Race Face rings with a new 8 spd setup (X.7 shifters, 850 cassette, and PC-68 chain)?

    Thanks!

  19. #19
    JmZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by TUMBLEWEED
    I think I'm going to tackle this conversion on my Burner....

    Would it cause any problems for me to continue using the X.9 rear, LX M-571 front, and Race Face rings with a new 8 spd setup (X.7 shifters, 850 cassette, and PC-68 chain)?

    Thanks!
    From my experience, and mine only.

    I'm using a Shimano 9 speed front and rear mech with 8 speed shifter and cassette, and SRAM chain (cassette two on another bike) without any problems.

    JmZ
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  20. #20
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    You CAN use 9-spd shifters with an 8-spd cassette!

    Here's a link to Sheldon Brown's website: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/dura-ace.html

    Look at the picture titled Alternate Cable Routing (B). I just tried that with my Deore 9-speed shifters, using an 8-speed chain and 8-speed cassette. It works! The alternate cable routing moves the rear derailleur 11% more with each click of the shifter. This works just as well as 8-speed trigger or thumb shifters. I've used both.

    BTW, a 9-speed chain works fine on an 8-speed system, so all you need for a conversion is an 8-speed cassette. Really!

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by LarryG
    BTW, a 9-speed chain works fine on an 8-speed system, so all you need for a conversion is an 8-speed cassette. Really!
    Agreed. I've used 9 speed chains on 8 speed cassettes for 2 seasons, no issues.

    I run Alivio RF+ shifters, they work as well as any other shifter I've tried. I can tell no difference in performance between my cheap Alivio shifters and friends LX and XT shifters. If they didn't work great, I would have changed them. That said, I might go with a set of XT 740 shifters this winter as I want to replace my integrated brake levers.

  22. #22
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    I still have 8 speed. Never saw a reason to switch. If you like grip shift there are plenty of shifters available.

  23. #23
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    8 all the way

    I've been using XTR steel 8 cassettes and old sram 9.0 shifters and 9.0 derailliers for the past 6 years. never ever have a problem with the stuff. change the chain every few months and keep riding, I go entire summers without adjusting my derailliers...

    you can find all sorts of 8 sp stuff on ebay.

  24. #24
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    Steel vs Aluminum ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Hecubus
    If 8 speed parts were more plentiful it could be worth considering. With their scarcity its simply more of a hassle than its worth for whats really not that big of a deal. Get your 9 speed tuned right and it will work just fine.



    A forged XTR will have a much higher chance of surviving an impact than a POS die cast Acera. The only thing more durable than an XTR is maybe the Saint or Hone.

    Deore and Acera rings are steel. LX and above are aluminum. Steel is more durable (but weighs more). Acera is 8 speed specific (thicker).

    If I had to guess, I'd guess that POS Acera ring is WAY more durable than a featherweight XTR.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by willtsmith_nwi
    Deore and Acera rings are steel. LX and above are aluminum. Steel is more durable (but weighs more). Acera is 8 speed specific (thicker).

    If I had to guess, I'd guess that POS Acera ring is WAY more durable than a featherweight XTR.
    Maybe if you read first you'd notice we're talking about derailleurs. XTR is the only Shimano derailleur that is forged except for maybe Saint. All the rest are die cast. An Acera derailleur is die cast aluminium. Oh and lets not forget the whole design aspect of the things where the XTR has nice ovesized reinforced pins and pivots to maximize strength while the Acera, well just doesn't.
    Last edited by Hecubus; 10-21-2005 at 10:30 AM.

  26. #26
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    Just switched a bike...

    My primary ride is 8-speed (SRAM 9.0) already, but both my wife's Rocky ETS-X and her Raleigh M80 hardtail came with Shimano 9-speed (XT and LX rear derailleurs, respectively) and have had lots of problems compared to mine. Frankly, I've seen absolutely no upside to having 9 cogs. Note that we don't race, but we do ride technical SOCAL trails.

    It just seems like all the tuning in the world with a Shimano 9-speed setup gets one hour's worth of good riding before problems crop up. Note that I find Shimano 9-speed to be fine for casual riding - mostly, the problems occur while shifting under load on steep climbs. Primarily, this means the rear dearilleur causes the chain to slip and pop (with a resulting complete loss of momentum) and sometimes it throws the chain into the spokes despite very careful limit adjustments (setting the lower limit where the chain will barely even seat on the big cog and definitely can't move past it). I've seen these problems with Deore and LX rapidfire pods as well as SRAM Rocket (Shimano compatible) twist shifters.

    After changing the Rocky to SRAM 9-speed with some improvement, I went ahead and changed it to SRAM 8-speed today. We're both partial to twist shift anyway, so the fact that triggers are harder to find in 8-speed isn't a problem.

    For the record, I'm running the SRAM PG-850 cassette and a Shimano HG 9-speed chain with no problems so far. I'll report back if there are any problems.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homebrew
    Ditto. I don't know if it's necessarily lighter but it's definitely a more mud/muck tolerant system. 9 speed offers some closer ratios (not noticeable off-road), smaller chainrings and larger cogs. I use a 12-32 XTR cassette with the bottom three cogs off an XT 11-30. This gives me a wide enough range at 11-32. I have recently downsized my cranks to compact but stuck with a 34T middle ring. If I wanted to slightly lower gearing, I can go to a 32T middle ring. The only real trouble with 8 speed is finding high end cassettes.
    Same here, I never "upgraded" to 9 speed. I don't need a 34 and the spacing of a 8-speed 11-32 or 12-32 is just fine without having another gear in.

    The problem will be when my stack of XT cassettes runs out ... although my wife is using a SRAM 8 speed 11-32 and I like it, the big gap of the last two rings is hardly felt ...

  28. #28
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    As a follow-up, the first test ride shows this was a success...

  29. #29
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    The 8 speed 9 speed debate. I'm a diehard 8 speed standard drive MTB'er. The best grearing I've found is 26-36-46 with 12-32 in the back. As far as 8 speed shifters. If you run canti brakes (of course I like these the best) you can find both the brakes and shifter/ lever (NOS) combinations on Ebay. If you want to go even cheaper, look for 7 speed stuff, just remove the 14 tooth clog (second one up) of the 12-32 XTR 8 speed. Now that where talking about old school, I must admit, the best crank ever is the 1st gen XTR. Having a new fancy bike and 90's stuff, I like the 90's tech better. I mean they still had 21 lbs hardtails.
    Last edited by The Goat Killer; 10-27-2005 at 08:30 AM.

  30. #30
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    As a bike shop mechanic for 5 years I tried a lot of stuff, and adjusted pretty much everything out there, with various degrees of wear, etc. I was once a 8sp holdout like many of you. But now IMO even mid-level Sram X-series 9sp shifts better and holds adjustment much better than XT and XTR 8sp. That's after years of riding and on many different bikes, etc. The 1:1 ratio is where it's at. Now that Sram has offered both triggers and twists for years I see no problem letting 8sp fade into extinction.
    Quote Originally Posted by Hesh to Steel
    With people liking mongoose and trek bikes now, what's next in this crazy world? People disliking the bottlerocket?!

  31. #31
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    Idea! the 9th gear

    every shimano gearbox comes with pretty interesting smooth shifting.currently im using a 8-speed gearbox,however still thinking of shifting to 9 because of its many advanatges.speed,control,power.thiese 3 are the major factor that leaves the 8 speed gearbox behind.with better speed,you can have more power in your riding and with that,a better control over the whole trail.
    if possible,you might wants to consider the 9-speed shifitng as cannodales bikes already using 10 speed gearbox.the trend remains 8 now,but i think it will imprvoe to 9.

  32. #32
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    i'm running an 8 speed complete drivetrain

    Truvativ boxguide
    Shimano deore
    alivio 8 sp shifters
    8 speed casette
    shimano ig-31 chain
    36 tooth chainwheel

    one thing to say, completly unbreakable

    you can also go with the Acera or the Alivio. I dont know about the alivio, but the Acera has served me well, and the deore has served me better.
    Ibex bikes

    2007 Ibex Trophy SS
    2006 Jamis Komodo 3.0
    2006 Ibex Zone FR-1
    2004 Special-Ed P.2 A.1

  33. #33
    willtsmith_nwi
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    SRAM and 8 speed ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Hecubus
    If 8 speed parts were more plentiful it could be worth considering. With their scarcity its simply more of a hassle than its worth for whats really not that big of a deal. Get your 9 speed tuned right and it will work just fine.



    A forged XTR will have a much higher chance of surviving an impact than a POS die cast Acera. The only thing more durable than an XTR is maybe the Saint or Hone.

    SRAM is now making 8-speed in their X.0 line (X.0 Gripshift). There are lots of cassettes and rings out there that can keep your 8-speed humming.

  34. #34
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    It sucks when you can only find Alivio and forced to put that stuff on there when you've got high end parts for everything else. I saw some Alivio triggers a while back at jenson for like 15 or 20 bucks. LX shifters are fine but anything less than that is not going on my bike. Too bad 9 spd has taken over the market.

  35. #35
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    The main thing I hate about 9 speeds are the stupid thin chains that break way easier than the 8 speed chains. I could go for years on an 8 speed chain no problems, 9 speeds have to be replaced very often or they break. I hate being stranded and having to walk back. Other than that, the 8 speeds shift way better than the 9 speeds, I'm actually thinking about going with sram on my new bike since people say it shifts as good or better than the old shimano stuff, I'm just worried about the fact I hear of so many people having sram stuff break, I also don't like the idea of going back to thumb shifters rather than trigger shifters (sram likes to call them triggers, but they are thumb shifters which shimano abandoned years ago, and I was glad to see them go, I like the triggers way better, but of coarse now they are going to stop making them). Luckily I still have a few weeks until my frame gets here to decide, good luck on your decision.

  36. #36
    83 feet less per minute
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    I like my X-9 (thumb) triggers quite well. Much better than Shimano triggers IMHO. My bike has no Shimano part, but I have nothing against them.
    Want to ride in this life and the next? Ask me how.

  37. #37
    John Galt
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    [QUOTE=Mt. Biker]...I also don't like the idea of going back to thumb shifters rather than trigger shifters (sram likes to call them triggers, but they are thumb shifters which shimano abandoned years ago, and I was glad to see them go, I like the triggers way better, but of coarse now they are going to stop making them).[QUOTE]

    Shifting is mostly about personal preference. I assume you don't like twist shifters, as that's another SRAM option for you. I prefer twist, personally - light weight, simplicity, durability in a crash due to few parts sticking out and micro-indexing for the front derailleur are all twist advantages. Still, if you don't like it...you don't like it.

    Just for clarification, "thumb shifters" usually refer to the bar-top, one lever thumb shifters offered up until the early nineties by both Shimano and Suntour and still sold by Paul's Components. SRAM triggers are more like the first generation Shimano Rapidfire shifters (came out in about 1991), which are often referred to as "push-push" or "thumb-thumb" shifters, where there are two levers, both under the bar and both operated by the thumb.

    I used the DX push-push shifters for years on one bike (1991 Rockhopper Comp) with no troubles and thus got used to that type of shifting. Now, however, I have other bikes with push-push shifter problems and have heard many horror stories from people who had trouble with them when they were new. My understanding is that Shimano push-push shifting was abandoned because of reliability and not so much because of the operation (?). SRAM wouldn't have the same reliability problems because they probably operate in a completely different manner (internally).

    After twist, I prefer anything with only thumb shifting, as it's easier to keep a good grip that way or use the brakes vs. using my index finger to shift in one direction...

  38. #38
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    [QUOTE=cegrover][QUOTE=Mt. Biker]...I also don't like the idea of going back to thumb shifters rather than trigger shifters (sram likes to call them triggers, but they are thumb shifters which shimano abandoned years ago, and I was glad to see them go, I like the triggers way better, but of coarse now they are going to stop making them).

    Shifting is mostly about personal preference. I assume you don't like twist shifters, as that's another SRAM option for you. I prefer twist, personally - light weight, simplicity, durability in a crash due to few parts sticking out and micro-indexing for the front derailleur are all twist advantages. Still, if you don't like it...you don't like it.

    Just for clarification, "thumb shifters" usually refer to the bar-top, one lever thumb shifters offered up until the early nineties by both Shimano and Suntour and still sold by Paul's Components. SRAM triggers are more like the first generation Shimano Rapidfire shifters (came out in about 1991), which are often referred to as "push-push" or "thumb-thumb" shifters, where there are two levers, both under the bar and both operated by the thumb.

    I used the DX push-push shifters for years on one bike (1991 Rockhopper Comp) with no troubles and thus got used to that type of shifting. Now, however, I have other bikes with push-push shifter problems and have heard many horror stories from people who had trouble with them when they were new. My understanding is that Shimano push-push shifting was abandoned because of reliability and not so much because of the operation (?). SRAM wouldn't have the same reliability problems because they probably operate in a completely different manner (internally).

    After twist, I prefer anything with only thumb shifting, as it's easier to keep a good grip that way or use the brakes vs. using my index finger to shift in one direction...

    I am refering to the push push levers... I switched from those to the rapid fire triggers and loved the change (but yes they were better than the older top mount thumb shifters)... seems like the srams are like the old push push which I didn't like as much, I call them thumb shifters because you push them with your thumb, you pull a trigger with your finger, I'm not sure how you can call something you push with your thumb a trigger.

  39. #39
    willtsmith_nwi
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    Be nice about SRAM thumbies ...

    ... deleted ....
    Last edited by willtsmith_nwi; 11-02-2005 at 07:34 PM. Reason: Someone else had made the point

  40. #40
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    push-push vs Rapidfire

    My Shimano 8 speed has rapidfire--i.e. I push with my thumb and pull back with my index finger. This has always been so intuitive to me that I never wanted to change my shifting habits. I know Shimano's original design was push (thumb) push (thumb). A while back I test rode a new bike with Sram push-push and it drove me nuts (not discussing 1:1 or 1:2 here) just the fact my thumb was doing all the work. It just seemed ridiculous to make your thumbs do all the work. As this is a discussion forum I just thought I'd give my two cents on something that I'd never consider using, call it advice to someone wondering if it was for them.

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