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  1. #1
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    Shop replaced rear derailure now bike shifts horribly and shop feeds me Bs

    I took my bike in for a tune up and to have a broken chain and ready to die rear derailure replaced/upgraded from a LX to XT, the chain is a Sram alittle nicer then my current chain. I picked it up today rode it around the lot and took it back in since it had bad chain suck and threw the chain when I upshifted to the big front chain ring. They claimed that the bike not shifting easily from the small front chainring to the middle (need to push lever way beyond normal point, and the bike making noise when I was in the small chainring were normal though the bike didn't do it before. When I took it home and rode it more to get it better I also noticed when pedeling hard in the two smallest rear cogs causes the chain to jump between gears. What is causing this, these are the only things I can think of. 1. improperly adjusted derailures 2. chain length incorrect 3. the mix of three year old well used front and rear cogs with new chain and rear derailure. 4 They are correct about the noise in the small front chainring and hard shifting. Any suggestions before I take it to a seperate shop for a second opinion tomorrow to see if they can figure it out, but I would like some background before hand.
    Last edited by mikeyp187; 08-13-2004 at 05:57 PM. Reason: edited for clarity

  2. #2
    rolling in the greens
    Reputation: vermont's Avatar
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    ya dude your old chain stretched with time and so it wore into the grooves in between the teeth on your cassette and chainrings....a new chain doesn't fit into those grooves and so skips under pedaling pressure....after 3 years it's probably time for a cassette and the two smaller chainrings.

  3. #3
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    Agree w/Vermont that your cassette & and possibly rings are suspect. The skipping on the cassette (unless your shop is totally incompetent at rear derailleur adjustment) is a pretty solid indication of a worn cassette.

    Your front shifting problem is a little trickier to diagnose -- I'm more apt to suggest a slight derailleur adjustment is needed. Worn rings normally let their presence be known as you're cranking up a hill under full load and the chain suddenly lets go, sending you over bars in spectacular fashion.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speedüb Nate
    Agree w/Vermont that your cassette & and possibly rings are suspect. The skipping on the cassette (unless your shop is totally incompetent at rear derailleur adjustment) is a pretty solid indication of a worn cassette.

    Your front shifting problem is a little trickier to diagnose -- I'm more apt to suggest a slight derailleur adjustment is needed. Worn rings normally let their presence be known as you're cranking up a hill under full load and the chain suddenly lets go, sending you over bars in spectacular fashion.
    I forgot to mention before but the skipping was noticable or non existant before I tried to adjust the front derailurer a little bit. I hope I don't need a new casette I already killed my budget getting all the work done to get the bike working again. This is my forth chain since I got the bike so would that help the life out of the other components? I wish I had more time to deal with and not having to leave in less then a week for a race. Is a casette something hard to change out?

  5. #5
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    Depends how worn the chain got and how used the cassette is. If you're measuring the chain for 0.5% stretch before replacing you might be in good shape.

    A cassette swap is pretty simple but requires a lockring adapter and a chain whip. Visit http://www.ParkTool.com for suggested tools, procedure & pics.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speedüb Nate
    Depends how worn the chain got and how used the cassette is. If you're measuring the chain for 0.5% stretch before replacing you might be in good shape.

    A cassette swap is pretty simple but requires a lockring adapter and a chain whip. Visit http://www.ParkTool.com for suggested tools, procedure & pics.
    Great thanks, I never did measure the chain It was just something replaced whenever I broke one or after a year of use, but I'm hoping its just imporperly adjusted, judging from the comments they made today to me I wouldn't be surprised if it wasn't done right. Not to mention the fact that they didn't adjust my disc brakes right either. Its a shame too I liked that shop and until this time they did great work. Otherwise I'll see about a new casette, come to think of it one of my buddies on the team I am riding with probably has the chainwhip and lockring removal tools I need, and can help out. Thanks for your help I'll let you know how it turns out.

  7. #7
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    You guys were right thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by Speed?e
    Agree w/Vermont that your cassette & and possibly rings are suspect. The skipping on the cassette (unless your shop is totally incompetent at rear derailleur adjustment) is a pretty solid indication of a worn cassette.

    Your front shifting problem is a little trickier to diagnose -- I'm more apt to suggest a slight derailleur adjustment is needed. Worn rings normally let their presence be known as you're cranking up a hill under full load and the chain suddenly lets go, sending you over bars in spectacular fashion.
    Thanks for your help you guys were right. I took the bike down to another shop and had them adjust the front and rear derailures and they looked at the rear casette and it was definitly worn but they were out of stock of replacements. After calling every shop in town I finially found someone that had a decent 9 speed model in stock. I was going to try putting it on myself but the shop offered to install it for nothing. I took the bike for a hard (almost flat out the whole way) 3 mile road ride, since it was lightly raining and a tropical storm was approaching. The bike shifted great in the middle chainring and doesn't hunt gears at all like it did. I still have some chain suck and noise in the small chain ring, but I know I am going to need new cranks soon and I am assuming this is caused by wear, They will be replaced in the future.. Plus I am sure that the new components need some miles on them before they are broken in.
    Last edited by mikeyp187; 08-14-2004 at 04:51 PM.

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