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  1. #1
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    Shimano and Sram together?

    I have Shimano shifters... and I want to get a Sram X.O.

    Will that work?

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Purple Liquid
    I have Shimano shifters... and I want to get a Sram X.O.

    Will that work?
    Nope. SRAM uses 1:1 cable ratio while Shimano uses 2:1

  3. #3
    Singletracker
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    No.

    SRAM uses a different ratio of shifting if you will, you will always need a SRAM shiter for Shimano. Either SRAM X.7, X.9 or X.0 trigger shifters.

    However you can run a Shimano RD with a SRAM Attack shifters.

  4. #4
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    Chances are that if a Deore LX rear derailleur won't do an absolutely perfect job with 7, 8, or 9 speed Shimano shifters, then there is something wrong with:
    Shifters
    Cassette
    Derailleur hanger
    Chain
    Chainring

    Problem solvers:

    While a new Shimano chain works great an a new Shimano cassette, after the cassette becomes worn, an SRAM chain will work better. This is one of the very rare cases where a "mixmatch" is a good idea.

    It is highly likely to need to replace the rear cassette whenever replacing a worn out chain.
    LX cassettes work very well,
    the XT 11-32 is a loser but the rest are very nice,
    and the XTR 11-32 cassette is just fine.

    SRAM cassettes only work very well with SRAM rear deraillers, chains and shifters (although you may use Deore front derailleur, which works better than any of SRAMs). Yes, they are "Shimano compatible" cassettes, but since they are not hyperglide, the very fine performance only comes with using matched parts.
    An SRAM system is an inexpensive way to remove some weight from your bike, if replacing Deore or lower components.

    In many cases, it is wise to replace the middle front chainring or whichever you use most, and re-torque the bottom bracket; and this is especially true when replacing a chain that was very worn. This is just part of regular maintenance.

    When considering upgrades:
    A caution about the 9 speed chain. . . There is no 9 speed chain strong enough to withstand a rider seriously sprinting a 24 tooth chainring with a 32 tooth gear on back. For high-strength application, use the 8 speed chains. In my opinion, the 9 speed chain is unsuitable for mountain bike application.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by danielhaden
    Chances are that if a Deore LX rear derailleur won't do an absolutely perfect job with 7, 8, or 9 speed Shimano shifters, then there is something wrong with:
    Shifters
    Cassette
    Derailleur hanger
    Chain
    Chainring

    Problem solvers:

    While a new Shimano chain works great an a new Shimano cassette, after the cassette becomes worn, an SRAM chain will work better. This is one of the very rare cases where a "mixmatch" is a good idea.

    It is highly likely to need to replace the rear cassette whenever replacing a worn out chain.
    LX cassettes work very well,
    the XT 11-32 is a loser but the rest are very nice,
    and the XTR 11-32 cassette is just fine.

    SRAM cassettes only work very well with SRAM rear deraillers, chains and shifters (although you may use Deore front derailleur, which works better than any of SRAMs). Yes, they are "Shimano compatible" cassettes, but since they are not hyperglide, the very fine performance only comes with using matched parts.
    An SRAM system is an inexpensive way to remove some weight from your bike, if replacing Deore or lower components.

    In many cases, it is wise to replace the middle front chainring or whichever you use most, and re-torque the bottom bracket; and this is especially true when replacing a chain that was very worn. This is just part of regular maintenance.

    When considering upgrades:
    A caution about the 9 speed chain. . . There is no 9 speed chain strong enough to withstand a rider seriously sprinting a 24 tooth chainring with a 32 tooth gear on back. For high-strength application, use the 8 speed chains. In my opinion, the 9 speed chain is unsuitable for mountain bike application.
    Its funny you mention that, I just busted a sram 9spd chain (not sure what model, about $ 30 @ lbs) when i was on my lower front chain ring and 32 cog in the back. its a used cassette so it might have been that but I was pushing semi hard.

    i will look into getting an 8sp chain.

  6. #6
    The devil is an angel too
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob46802
    Its funny you mention that, I just busted a sram 9spd chain (not sure what model, about $ 30 @ lbs) when i was on my lower front chain ring and 32 cog in the back. its a used cassette so it might have been that but I was pushing semi hard.

    i will look into getting an 8sp chain.
    An 8 speed chain on a 9 speed cassette? that sounds like a great idea!

  7. #7
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    maybe I dont understand what daniel haden was saying then. im new to upgrading parts on my bike so i have a lot to learn.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob46802
    maybe I dont understand what daniel haden was saying then. im new to upgrading parts on my bike so i have a lot to learn.
    I really don't know what he wanted to say, but using an 8 speed chain on a 9 speed set up does not seem like a good idea. There is a reason why they make 9 speed chains, you know? that reason being that to squeeze 9 cogs where they used to have only 8 they had to space them closer. The problem with that is that the space where the cahin fits got smaller, so they needed a thinner chain. See where I'm going? I'm sure somebody around here has tried an 8 speed chain on a 9 speed set up, but, it just seem like a bad idea. Like I said, there is a reason they make 9 speed chains. And that reason is not only because they break more often.

  9. #9
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    yes, that makes sense. and im sure that there are plenty of people running 9spd chains with no problems.

    on my older 04 fsr xc pro, I ran the stock setup for over a year and had lots of miles on it with no chain or drivetrain problems and im guessing that specialized used a 9spd chain.

  10. #10
    Chrome Toaster
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    Quote Originally Posted by danielhaden

    SRAM cassettes only work very well with SRAM rear deraillers, chains and shifters (although you may use Deore front derailleur, which works better than any of SRAMs). Yes, they are "Shimano compatible" cassettes, but since they are not hyperglide, the very fine performance only comes with using matched parts.
    An SRAM system is an inexpensive way to remove some weight from your bike, if replacing Deore or lower components.

    When considering upgrades:
    A caution about the 9 speed chain. . . There is no 9 speed chain strong enough to withstand a rider seriously sprinting a 24 tooth chainring with a 32 tooth gear on back. For high-strength application, use the 8 speed chains. In my opinion, the 9 speed chain is unsuitable for mountain bike application.
    Sram cassettes will work fine on any derrailleur as will shimano. The chain used is the only thing that will have a direct influence on a cassettes performance. A derailleur only needs to move 4.35mm to accomplish a shift in a 9 speed system. 4.35mm is 4.35mm regardless if a Shimano or Sram derrailleur moved the chain that distance.

    And ok, seriously, who sprints in a 24-32 combo? 8 speed chains will NOT fit on 9 speed cogs. The chain is generally too wide to fit between the adjacent cogs. 9 speed chains on the other hand will work quite well on 8 speed since the cog width and internal chain spacing are virtually identical in 8 and 9 speed. Some people have gotten away with an 8 speed chain on 9 speed system because there is really no set standard on how thick chains are. It varies pretty significantly between manufacturers. 9 speed chains can range from aroun 6.5mm to 6.9mm and 8 speed from around 7.1 to 7.3mm. That measurement only indicates the width of the chain at its thickest point, the pins. It gives no indication of how thick or how far into the pin the plates are in the chain, nor how carved out the plates might be to enhance shifting. All factors which have more influence on a chains strength than the old 8 vs 9 speed comparison. As an example, shimano chains are 6.6mm for 9 speed and 7.3mm for 8 speed. There is no way a Shimano 8 speed chain will fit into a 9 speed cogset. Sram chains are 6.9mm for 9 speed but 7.1mm for 8 speed. A smaller 8 speed might barely fit into a 9 speed cogset but not with anything resembling reliable or smooth shifting.

  11. #11
    Chrome Toaster
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    Quote Originally Posted by Purple Liquid
    I have Shimano shifters... and I want to get a Sram X.O.

    Will that work?
    Simple answer, NO.

    Technical answer: Shimano and Sram use different pull ratio's. Sram is 1.1:1, Shimano is 1.7:1. 60% difference. That means that a shimano shifter will only move an Sram derrailleur up to 7 cogs by the time the shifter has clicked through all 9, and of those 7 cogs shifted, none will align with each sprocket jumpled on the cassette.

  12. #12
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    That is a rather terrible idea. 8 speed chains will jam up a 9 speed cassette.

    To use an 8 speed chain, you'll need either a set of Shimano LX, with 8 speed shifters (8 speed cassette of LX or XT11-34 or XTR11-32)
    OR
    a set of SRAM SX5 rear derailleur, 8 speed cassette, 8 speed 1:1 shifter (Deore front derailleur recommended),
    and
    these are the minimum that return professional grade results.
    Specifically, the Shimano LX rear derailleur is almost as featherweight as the XT and XTR, while returning exactly the same performance, yet the LX cassettes are heavier--use this to run the HG70 chain. SRAM's system is all lighter weight, less expensive and works very well, except that you should avoid their front derailleurs--use this to run the PC58 chain.

    The cheaper way to go is:
    Just put a dura-ace chain (strongest 9-speed) onto your 9 speed system, plus you'll need to pack with you several Shimano 9 speed chain patch pins and a chain tool. Review the directions for the orientation of the chain pin.
    Basically, the directions prevent the outer link of the chain from encountering the higher teeth of an under-load downshift at the rear cassette. It is the inner link of the chain that should encounter this forceful effect first. The orientation goes: The inner link pulls on the chainpin as you pedal so that it goes into the cassette ahead of the outer link. That way, the inner link takes the brunt of the downshift forces that would otherwise have spread open the outer link and released the chain.

    A SRAM powerlink gold does fit the Dura Ace chain. However you do still need to carry the special Shimano patch pins and the chain tool. Yes, that does make the SRAM Powerlink nearly useless, except for the convenience of washing the chain.

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