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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    RF chainring bolts are weak!

    In the process of tracking down a creak in the bb/crank area, I remove the chainring bolts to grease them and to torque them to specs. While removing, one bolt's head cracks right off and the other 3 bolts had major cracks eminating from the head. I'm not sure if these were manufacturing defects or not but I assume that they are as I have not tightened these bolts since I've gotten the bike about 6 months ago. Fortunately, I have some leftover bolts from some SS conversions and used those instead. However, the creak is still there... Bummer.

  2. #2
    Get your freak on!
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    Yes they are weak - As much as I love saving weight, I just could not get the alloy bolts to work. If I did them up to spec then I would get creaking from the chainrings, once i tightened them, then the creak would go away but they would start showing cracks.

    I now run raceface SS bolts with alloy bolts for the granny ring without any problems!

    As for your creak, if it's not the chainring bolts, then try greasing the spindle/interface/bolt.

    Also regrease your BB and make sure it is tight and check to see that the bearings are running smooth


  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by bike_freak
    Yes they are weak - As much as I love saving weight, I just could not get the alloy bolts to work. If I did them up to spec then I would get creaking from the chainrings, once i tightened them, then the creak would go away but they would start showing cracks.

    I now run raceface SS bolts with alloy bolts for the granny ring without any problems!

    As for your creak, if it's not the chainring bolts, then try greasing the spindle/interface/bolt.

    Also regrease your BB and make sure it is tight and check to see that the bearings are running smooth
    I may still put on some steel chainring bolts on the crank if the creak continues annoying me.
    I've put on some teflon tape on the pedal threads, greased and torqued them down so I know it's not the pedals (or the cleats since I can replicate the creak wearing sandals).
    I've taken the crankset off and cleaned all parts and replaced the bearings with some new RF X Type bearings.
    I used anti-sieze on the bb shell threads and wrapped the RF bb threads with a double wrap of teflon tape. I lubed all the spacers and the spindle/bearing interface as well as all washers, bolts and the axle (where the crank is torqued down). Everything was tightened according to spec.
    Prior to doing all of the above, I cleaned and lubed the QR, checked the wheel tension, tightened all pivots, inspected the seatpost and cleaned the clamping area, cleaned all cable housings and stops... Oyyyy...

  4. #4
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    I've broken the RF bolts also, I have an old set of Ti SRP bolts that have lasted for ages (with anti-seize of course)

  5. #5
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Aluminum chainring bolts? Of course they are weak!
    Alloy bolts only last a few months for me. I either pop the heads or stretch the threads. Steel bolts last 1-2 years before the heads start popping on me. Been that way for 20 years.
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  6. #6
    Vaginatarian
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    Quote Originally Posted by flipnidaho
    I may still put on some steel chainring bolts on the crank if the creak continues annoying me.
    I've put on some teflon tape on the pedal threads, greased and torqued them down so I know it's not the pedals (or the cleats since I can replicate the creak wearing sandals).
    I've taken the crankset off and cleaned all parts and replaced the bearings with some new RF X Type bearings.
    I used anti-sieze on the bb shell threads and wrapped the RF bb threads with a double wrap of teflon tape. I lubed all the spacers and the spindle/bearing interface as well as all washers, bolts and the axle (where the crank is torqued down). Everything was tightened according to spec.
    Prior to doing all of the above, I cleaned and lubed the QR, checked the wheel tension, tightened all pivots, inspected the seatpost and cleaned the clamping area, cleaned all cable housings and stops... Oyyyy...
    did you grease the seatpost?

  7. #7
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    FSA Torx-30 alloy chainring bolts are great. They use the Torx configuration because it allows to take less material out of the head thus making it stronger. Torque spec is 104 inch pounds, which is very high for an alloy bolt.

  8. #8
    Nouveau Retrogrouch SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by dulyebr
    FSA Torx-30 alloy chainring bolts are great. They use the Torx configuration because it allows to take less material out of the head thus making it stronger. Torque spec is 104 inch pounds, which is very high for an alloy bolt.
    I would not use them just because I would need to add a T-30 wrench to my on-bike tool kit. It is not a common bike size.

    They could still have the thread stretching issue I have encountered, too. This happens for me before the heads pop.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

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